green streets
Follow
Find tag "art"
34.2K views | +5 today
green streets
thoughts, ideas + dialogues on urban revitalization, smart growth + neighborhood development
Curated by Lauren Moss
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Reprogramming the City: New Opportunities for Urban Infrastructure

Reprogramming the City: New Opportunities for Urban Infrastructure | green streets | Scoop.it

Curated by urban strategist Scott Burham, the latest exhibition at theDAC explores the array of untapped potential in our urban environments. Through installations such as a light therapy bus stop and a billboard that converts humidity into drinking water, the show will consider how infrastructure can encourage human interaction, perform alternative functions or assume an entirely new role.

more...
Norm Miller's curator insight, December 30, 2014 3:38 PM

Design can make a huge difference in terms of livable cities.

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Seattle's New Streetlights Are 40-Foot-Tall Singing Flowers

Seattle's New Streetlights Are 40-Foot-Tall Singing Flowers | green streets | Scoop.it
The immense plants live under the Space Needle and blast anybody passing underneath with a harmony of voices.


Under the Space Needle, 40-foot-tall flowers acting both as lamps and troubadours that croon when people get near. The Pacific Science Center commissioned this trippy artwork for its novel design and use of solar electricity – the petals of each "flower" are studded with photovoltaic cells that allow them to shimmer in vibrant hues.

more...
Laura Brown's comment, August 27, 2013 8:22 PM
They'll look like an alien invasion in winter.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

A Public Art Installation Bridges the Gap Created by an Overpass

A Public Art Installation Bridges the Gap Created by an Overpass | green streets | Scoop.it

A conversation with the Arizona-based duo behind San Antonio's "Ballroom Luminoso," among other projects...


Joe O'Connell and Blessing Hancock are two Arizona-based artists who specialize in public art. But they're not the type to build your standard metal sculpture on a public plaza.

The duo operates a 14,000-square-foot fabrication facility in Tucson with 14 other artists, designers, engineers and craftspeople, making art out of fabricated metal, acrylic materials, LED lighting, and electronics.

Looking to find new ways for people to live and interact with art, O'Connell and Hancock create design pieces that help define the space they occupy and encourage interactivity. Their most recent project, "Ballroom Luminoso," debuted earlier this year under an elevated highway in San Antonio. Part of a neighborhood improvement plan, the project aims, through design, to bridge the physical boundary created by the I-10 highway, forming better connections between the different ethnicities and income levels in the area.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

4 Examples of Powerful Placemaking

4 Examples of Powerful Placemaking | green streets | Scoop.it

A little-known but very interesting government agency, the National Endowment for the Arts, is quietly leveraging small amounts of financial assistance to make a big difference in helping communities across the country become stronger and more alive.


Whether in Portland, Maine, Pendleton, South Carolina, the Kewa Pueblo in New Mexico, or another of the scores of locations that its Our Town program is assisting in all 50 states, the agency believes "creative placemaking" can strengthen "community identity and a sense of place, and help revitalize local economies." I couldn’t agree more.

Indeed, music, film, the visual arts, and even design tend to get us gathering and talking together, frequently in the same place. Sometimes they reinforce a shared sense of culture; sometimes they provoke us (and others) to think of our communities in new ways; sometimes they are just fun. (Do not discount happiness as important to sustainability.) Often they create vital, new identities or "brands" in cities, towns, and neighborhoods.

more...
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Green Artistry: Gardens By The Bay by Grant Associates

Green Artistry: Gardens By The Bay by Grant Associates | green streets | Scoop.it
Spread across 101 hectares of reclaimed land in Singapore's waterfront, a horticultural feast awaits visitors at the World Architecture Festival 2012.

Landscape architects, Grant Associates, designed three distinct garden bays including 18 supertrees, which range from 25 to 50m, at iconic points in the master plan. Two cooled conservatories designed by Wilkinson Eyre Architects and a stretch of horticultural gardens, which include animals sculpted from shrubbery, are also highlights in this green showcase.
‘At one level, Gardens by the Bay is a dramatic 3D garden experience,' says Keith French, project director. 'At another it is a sophisticated example of integrated environmental design.'
Mixing nature, technology and environmental notes, the orchid-inspired master plan facilitates the growth of endangered species and plants from Mediterranean and tropical regions in the two giant biodomes. Over an entire hectare of different flower species are hosted within the Flower Dome, and the Cloud Forest Dome contains 0.8 hectares of tropical plants.
The design encourages the public to interact with the project through a suspended, spiraling bridge which is attached to the supertrees for support. Visitors are encouraged to view the giant garden from many levels.
At night, the canopies glow with colours and projected media, offering an active landscape for visitors. Sustainable energy and water technologies are integrated into the supertrees and cooling conservatories...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Brightening Up NYC for Earth's Most Precious Resource

Brightening Up NYC for Earth's Most Precious Resource | green streets | Scoop.it

If you’ve ever been to Manhattan and gazed at the magnificent skyline, you may have noticed that most of the buildings are topped with huge wooden water tanks.

I lived there for 2 years before they were pointed out to me on a boat cruise around the island. It turns out that they aren’t ancient relics from the past, but are actually still used today on all buildings over six stories throughout the 5 boroughs. They use gravity to provide water pressure. Just as these crucial devices have gone unnoticed by many, so has the water crisis that we are facing today.


A non-profit, Word Above the Street has taken on a project to bring awareness to our Earth’s most precious resource: fresh water. The Water Tank Project will reshape the city’s skyline as artists and public school children decorate the tanks with original water-conservation themed artwork. The wrapped tanks will be up for 3 months in the Spring of 2013 for the world to see, hopefully inspiring other major cities to do the same...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Walk the Green Carpet

Walk the Green Carpet | green streets | Scoop.it

Public artists Gaëlle Villedary helped the French village of Jaujac celebrate the 10th year of its arts and nature trail programs by cutting a new green path through its city center. Using some 168 rollers of turf grass, spanning 420 meters (or nearly 1,400 feet), the public artists wound 3.5 tons of natural material through the streets of the old town...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Noguchi Museum Features Art as Urban Planning

Noguchi Museum Features Art as Urban Planning | green streets | Scoop.it
When the impetus for urban planning comes from the art studio instead of from public officials, you get the ideas seen in “Civic Action: A Vision for Long Island City” at the Noguchi Museum.

They aren’t granted as many opportunities as politicians or armies. But when all else fails, the visionary thinking of artists has become public policy. Ten years ago an artist turned mayor painted dilapidated buildings with bright primary colors in Tirana, Albania, performing a kind of art therapy on a depressed city. And in Bogotá, Colombia, traffic police were replaced with mimes in the hope of supplanting corruption and violence with playful street theater.

The situation in Long Island City isn’t as dire as in those localities. But that section of Queens has been threatened in recent decades by unchecked development, the loss of affordable housing and the chemical hangover of industrialization. And so the Noguchi Museum and Socrates Sculpture Park asked four artists to take a crack at city planning...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Can the arts save struggling cities?

Can the arts save struggling cities? | green streets | Scoop.it
Backed by millions of dollars in new grant money, "creative placemaking" promises to breathe new life into hard-hit urban areas. Will it work?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Placemaking & Minneapolis: The arts take the lead

Placemaking & Minneapolis: The arts take the lead | green streets | Scoop.it

There's always something happening on Hennepin Avenue. The wide, lively downtown Minneapolis boulevard has long specialized in entertainment, from the funky to the family-friendly to the high-cultural. It's also had its share of development woes. Now it's slated to be part of an ambitious project that will link it closely with the Walker Art Center at one end and the bustling redeveloped riverfront at the other. The method? Placemaking, with an accent on the arts.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Public art transforms the urban canvas

Public art transforms the urban canvas | green streets | Scoop.it
Public art has evolved into an essential element of urban placemaking and social engagement.

 
'Public art is increasingly an interactive, community-based experience. A focus on “social practice,” or engaging local communities in creating change through art, is borne out in public art pieces that are as thought-provoking as they are aesthetically pleasing.
 It should come as little surprise that in the era of Facebook, Twitter and the 24/7 conversation, public art is morphing into a tool for community engagement...'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Designer turns city fixtures into instant playgrounds

Designer turns city fixtures into instant playgrounds | green streets | Scoop.it

Dutch designer Thor ter Kulve creates tweaks for everyday city fixtures, temporarily imbuing them with childlike zest.


A boring light pole becomes a swing, for instance, and a fire hydrant becomes a fountain.

The fact that his inventions are temporary — “They are set up for a few hours and then removed without damaging the structure it was attached to,” PSFK says — doesn’t lessen their ability to charm or make the observer see the city in a new way.


From the designer:

Thanks to [these designs], dull and derelict places become hangouts of choice…It’s my strong belief that in a time of economic hardship and individual isolation, we should address ourselves to public space as a collectively owned domain and possible ways to use it to our joint benefit.

more...
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

25,000 LEDs: the World's Largest Digital Light Sculpture

25,000 LEDs: the World's Largest Digital Light Sculpture | green streets | Scoop.it

This month marked the official opening of the world's largest digital light sculpture- the Bay Lights in Northern California...


The Bay Lights is the world’s largest LED light sculpture, 1.8 miles wide and 500 feet high. Inspired by the Bay Bridge’s 75th Anniversary, its 25,000 white LED lights are individually programmed to create a never-repeating, dazzling display across the Bay Bridge West Span through 2015.

Drawing inspiration from the surroundings and the dynamic nature of the water below, artist Leo Villareal leveraged digital technology and innovative software to develop and realize the design...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

How a tough neighborhood is building a stronger future with vivid public art

How a tough neighborhood is building a stronger future with vivid public art | green streets | Scoop.it

A thriving inner-city cultural environment contributes to a healthy economic and social environment, which in turn produces significant benefits to the things we value in our natural environment: this is because the most effective antidote to the kind of sprawling outward development that has consumed our landscape, polluted our waterways and escalated harmful emissions across the US over the past half-century is a strengthening of our existing communities.


We particularly need our inner cities to be the kinds of places that will be loved and will endure – that will literally be sustained - over time. The human ecosystem is complex and, while making it healthy also requires a lot of things besides art, a holistic approach to placemaking that includes a key role for culture – especially homegrown culture – is essential.

That is exactly what Philly Painting is doing. To date, it is the most ambitious of many great projects sponsored by Philadelphia’s Mural Arts Program, the nation's largest initiative of its kind. Since 1984, the program has created over 3,000 murals and works of public art in the city, engaging over 100 communities each year in the process, according to its website. Mural Arts also sponsors free art education programs for youth, especially at-risk teens and, impressively,provides jobs to adult offenders in local prisons and rehabilitation centers, “using the restorative power of art to break the cycle of crime and violence in our communities.” If you are as interested in this sort of thing as I am, you’ll enjoy the program’s website, especially its sections on the program’s history and emphasis on community engagement.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Mosstika: Street Art Greens the Urban Jungle

Mosstika: Street Art Greens the Urban Jungle | green streets | Scoop.it
When we think of street art we often think of dry concrete, spray paint cans and urban wastelands... but that's not what you'll find here.

 

These creations have a drastically more “green” theme, striving to bring a bit of unexpected nature to the so-called urban jungle and in doing so a bit more life to its often weary inhabitants. The creations of gorilla street art collective Mosstika, each piece of art brings some literal green to the world, installing pieces of art with living grass and moss around the city.
In creating such beautiful pieces the New York based Mosstika, and their founder Edina Tokodi, want to give street art a new twist, providing viewers with art that they can reach out, touch and appreciate in a tactile way. In providing something beautiful that can be not only viewed but also interacted with, they hope to provide something that reconnects city-dwellers with nature and something that can in turn soulfully touch those viewers back.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Planning for Art - The Architect's Newspaper

Planning for Art - The Architect's Newspaper | green streets | Scoop.it

Chicago revising cultural and economic development strategy.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel has long been a vocal supporter of the arts. Now City Hall is coordinating an extensive outreach effort to check Chicago’s creative pulse, seeking comment on the city’s first new cultural plan in more than 25 years.

After his election in February 2011, Emanuel directed the Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events (DCASE) to revamp the Chicago Cultural Plan, which was created in 1986 under Mayor Harold Washington. DCASE launched a website in January to coordinate its efforts. They are expected to produce a draft plan by early summer.

“The arts are political,” said attorney Michael Dorf, who directed the process that created Mayor Washington’s plan. “They enrich us, they enrage us, they move us to action. And anything that does that is political.”

Formerly special counsel to Sidney R. Yates, chairman of the congressional appropriations committee, Dorf wanted to democratize cultural planning with the 1986 planning process. Instead of press conferences and backrooms, he said, the city should borrow from the basics of grassroots organizing.

It’s an approach Chicago’s current cultural commissioner, Michelle Boone, has revived for the 2012 plan. With the help of social media, Boone said her department is taking stock of the city’s existing cultural assets, identifying opportunities for “cultural hubs.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Bergamot 2? Art-Filled Market Planned on the San Pedro Waterfront

Bergamot 2? Art-Filled Market Planned on the San Pedro Waterfront | green streets | Scoop.it

The developers of Santa Monica’s gallery haven Bergamot Station are planning another art center, this time in San Pedro. “Crafted at the Port of Los Angeles,” which was just approved by the Los Angeles Harbor Department (city council approval is still pending) will offer paintings, sculptures, and other artworks sold by 500 artists sitting in open stalls. The facility, set to open next summer, will be located inside the city’s warehouses No. 9 and 10, located near Cabrillo Marina. The structures, totaling 140,000 square feet, were used by the Navy during the 1940s, then later for storage. Their clerestory windows and huge doors will allow lots of light and air inside.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

America's Best New Parks

America's Best New Parks | green streets | Scoop.it
By mixing fresh design with a variety of uses, these spaces represent the future of city parks...

As civic leaders and planners prepare for the 24/7, mixed-use urban core that is the new expectation of American cities, park design must evolve with these demands as much as any other form of infrastructure. These cities have positioned themselves at the top of our list for vibrant new park design.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Inside a pop-up: remaking an empty lot with art and community engagement

Inside a pop-up: remaking an empty lot with art and community engagement | green streets | Scoop.it

There has been a lot of buzz recently about pop-up urbanism. From New York to Vancouver, there are a number of new, small projects that reclaim a bit of underused space and turn them into public spaces. I have yet to find a really clear definition of “pop-up urbanism,” but the projects are generally small, often temporary, ways to explore creative possibilities urban space.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

polis: Strelka Institute: Urban Design vs. Dystopia

polis: Strelka Institute: Urban Design vs. Dystopia | green streets | Scoop.it

Strelka, located on the Moscow River, is perhaps excessively branded and hip (which is derivative by definition), but its human-scale, functional, ecologically concerned, preservation-sensitive, walker/biker-friendly, and public-oriented values are a welcome departure from the urban development process in Moscow over the past twenty years...

more...
No comment yet.