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Health Benefits of 15 Teas #Infographic

Health Benefits of 15 Teas #Infographic | Green Living | Scoop.it

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Smart D Home Blog: Energy Efficient Lighting Approach to get a Smart Home

Smart D Home Blog: Energy Efficient Lighting Approach to get a Smart Home | Green Living | Scoop.it
We currently are in a place and time where everyone is important for the amount of energy they consume. Sustainability has hence become a global concern, and a major attention has shifted towards energy efficient solutions. This is not just good for humanity as a whole, but you would also directly enjoy a reduction in your energy bills.
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To compensate for this lack of light, you could use daylight G9 light bulbs. These bulbs produce a "whiter" light when compared to the yellow hues given off by incandescent bulbs. Those work spaces of visual artists have a great need for daylight bulbs as it would enable the artists to view all colors as they would under normal light.
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Making your home green smart with wind power - Smart D Home Store's Blog

Making your home green smart with wind power - Smart D Home Store's Blog | Green Living | Scoop.it
These days it’s entirely possible for people to utilize wind power turning them at home green smart places. In terms of using wind power for a home, one essential component is the turbine. The propeller style turbine looks very similar to an airplane propeller and generally has three blades to catch the wind. One of …
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A Fracking Massive Methane Leak is Brewing in Texas

A Fracking Massive Methane Leak is Brewing in Texas | Green Living | Scoop.it

The Aliso Canyon Oil Field, a natural gas storage facility in southern California, spewed an estimated 96,000 metric tons of methane into the air over the last four months, before it was temporarily capped this week. At its worst, the leak, which has been likened to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, was responsible for a 25 percent increase in the state’s daily methane emissions. It also pushed hundreds of residents of the nearby Porter Ranch neighborhood out of their homes and prompted California’s governor to declare a state of emergency.

But a comparable climate disaster brewing in Texas has received far less attention from regulators and the media — perhaps because there isn’t a single huge leak to point to. Every hour, natural gas facilities in North Texas’ Barnett Shale region emit thousands of tons of methane — a greenhouse gas at least 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide — and a slate of noxious pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and benzene.

The Aliso Canyon leak was big. The Barnett leaks, combined, are even bigger. But regulators in Texas have done very little to address this well-documented problem.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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The Strategic Sourceror: Balancing supply chain sustainability and risk management

The Strategic Sourceror: Balancing supply chain sustainability and risk management | Green Living | Scoop.it
Improving sustainable practices
In its effort to reduce risks of disruptions while still managing to be sustainable and efficient in operations, some supply chain leaders are at a crossroads. This predicament is understandable since, as Ian Lefshitz, a contributor to Supply Chain Executive, worded it, "While there are obvious long-term benefits to more sustainable practices, a major challenge for corporations and procurement professionals in particular is ensuring that the entire supply chain meets established standards."

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EcoVadis's curator insight, January 26, 4:11 AM

Reliable indicators can help procurement teams resolve this predicament, and achieve risk reduction without sacrificing short term efficiency.

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How the GyroGlove Steadies Hands of Parkinson’s Patients

How the GyroGlove Steadies Hands of Parkinson’s Patients | Green Living | Scoop.it
A wearable device promises to help steady hand tremors by using an old technology—gyroscopes.

 

When he was a 24-year-old medical student living in London, Faii Ong was assigned to care for a 103-year-old patient who suffered from Parkinson’s, the progressive neurological condition that affects a person’s ease of movement. After watching her struggle to eat a bowl of soup, Ong asked another nurse what more could be done to help the woman. “There’s nothing,” he was grimly told.


Ong, now 26, didn’t accept the answer. He began to search for a solution that might offset the tremulous symptoms of Parkinson’s, a disease that affects one in 500 people, not through drugs but physics. After evaluating the use of elastic bands, weights, springs, hydraulics, and even soft robotics, Ong settled on a simpler solution, one that he recognized from childhood toys. “Mechanical gyroscopes are like spinning tops: they always try to stay upright by conserving angular momentum,” he explains. “My idea was to use gyroscopes to instantaneously and proportionally resist a person’s hand movement, thereby dampening any tremors in the wearer’s hand.”


Together with a number of other students from Imperial College London, Ong worked in the university’s prototyping laboratory to run numerous tests. An early prototype of a device, called GyroGlove, proved his instinct correct. Patients report that wearing the GyroGlove, which Ong believes to be the first wearable treatment solution for hand tremors, is like plunging your hand into thick syrup, where movement is free but simultaneously slowed. In benchtop tests, the team found the glove reduces tremors by up to 90 percent.


GyroGlove’s design is simple. It uses a miniature, dynamically adjustable gyroscope, which sits on the back of the hand, within a plastic casing attached to the glove’s material. When the device is switched on, the battery-powered gyroscope whirs to life. Its orientation is adjusted by a precession hinge and turntable, both controlled by a small circuit board, thereby pushing back against the wearer’s movements as the gyroscope tries to right itself.


While the initial prototypes of the device still require refinements to size and noise, Alison McGregor, professor of musculoskeletal biodynamics at Imperial College, who has been a mentor to the team, says the device “holds great promise and could have a significant impact on users’ quality of life.” Helen Matthews of the Cure Parkinson’s Trust agrees: “GyroGlove will make everyday tasks such as using a computer, writing, cooking, and driving possible for sufferers,” she says.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Mike Oehme's curator insight, January 26, 2:47 AM

Interesting idea, unfortunately I don't have a gyro trainer at home anymore

 

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Storing solar energy underground for a cloudy day

Storing solar energy underground for a cloudy day | Green Living | Scoop.it
A common criticism of a total transition to wind, water and solar power is that the US electrical grid can't affordably store enough standby electricity to keep the system stable. Now a researcher proposes an underground solution to that problem.

A new study shows that wind, water and solar generators can theoretically result in a reliable, affordable national grid when the generators are combined with inexpensive storage.


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New method for converting solar energy into electrical power using photo-bioelectrochemical cells

New method for converting solar energy into electrical power using photo-bioelectrochemical cells | Green Living | Scoop.it
A new paradigm for the development of photo-bioelectrochemical cells has been reported in the journal Nature Energy by researchers from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, in Israel, and the University of Bochum, in Germany.

The design of photo-bioelectrochemical cells based on native photosynthetic reaction is attracting substantial recent interest as a means for the conversion of solar light energy into electrical power.


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Health Benefits of 15 Teas #Infographic

Health Benefits of 15 Teas #Infographic | Green Living | Scoop.it

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Self-Filling Water Bottle Converts Humid Air into Drinkable H2O

Self-Filling Water Bottle Converts Humid Air into Drinkable H2O | Green Living | Scoop.it
Self-Filling Water Bottle Converts Humid Air into Drinkable H2O

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The feds just suspended new coal-mining leases on public lands. Will it finally kill off Big Coal?

The feds just suspended new coal-mining leases on public lands. Will it finally kill off Big Coal? | Green Living | Scoop.it

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management has just announced a long-term moratorium on new leases to mine coal on federal lands. While the 18- to 36-month moratorium is in place, the government will launch a suite of studies to determine how to make coal leases fair to U.S. taxpayers and consistent with the country’s commitment to climate change mitigation.

Given the beleaguered state of the U.S. coal industry, it’s probably inaccurate to call today’s announcement the beginning of the end. It’s more like the middle of the end. Or the end of the beginning of the end. Or … you get the idea. By the time the moratorium lifts, there may be little left of the coal industry.

The BLM’s move applies a set of pincers to coal, with economic challenges pressing in on one side and environmental ones tightening on the other.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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UK’s last resident killer whales 'doomed to extinction'

UK’s last resident killer whales 'doomed to extinction' | Green Living | Scoop.it
Western European waters are a global hotspot for lingering toxic PCB pollution, research reveals, damaging the reproduction of orcas and dolphins

The UK’s last pod of killer whales is doomed to extinction, with new research revealing western European waters as a global hotspot for the lingering legacy of toxic PCB pollution.

The persistent chemicals, used in electrical equipment but banned in the 1980s, are still leaking into the oceans and were also found in extremely high levels in European dolphins, whose populations are in decline.

The new research analysed levels of PCBs, which are known to harm breeding success and immune systems, in the blubber of more than 1,000 dolphins and killer whales over the last 20 years. The levels found “greatly exceed concentrations at which severe toxic effects are known to occur,” the scientists found.

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In Supreme Court, a Battle Over Fracking and Citizens' Rights

In Supreme Court, a Battle Over Fracking and Citizens' Rights | Green Living | Scoop.it
Jessica Ernst's long fight to challenge legislation putting energy regulator above the law reaches top court.

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Duane Tilden's curator insight, January 13, 2:11 PM

"[...] After years of legal wrangling, Jessica Ernst and Alberta's powerful energy regulator finally squared off in the Supreme Court of Canada yesterday.

For almost two hours, all nine justices questioned lawyers from both sides in a case that will determine if legislation can grant government agencies blanket immunity from lawsuits based on the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

At times the debate was so bogged down in legal jargon and little known cases that it felt as though the participants were holding a conversation in a foreign language. [...]

Ernst alleges the Alberta Energy Regulator violated her rights by characterizing her as a "criminal threat" and barring all communication with her.

The claims are part of her multipronged lawsuit related to the regulation of fracking. She says fracking contaminated aquifers near her homestead near Rosebud, about 110 kilometres east of Calgary, and is seeking $33 million in damages. [...]

The Supreme Court hearing dealt with Ernst's allegation that the provincial energy regulator denied her the right to raise her concerns about groundwater contamination. She argues that the legislation shielding the regulator from citizen's lawsuits should not bar charter claims.

Lawyers for Ernst, the BC Civil Liberties Association and the David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights all argued that the Alberta Energy Regulator's immunity clause undermined the spirit of Canada's charter, which is designed to protect citizens from government abuses of power.

It is patently unfair to allow a government to violate a citizen's basic freedoms and then deny them an appropriate remedy in the courts, especially when the charter itself grants that right, they argued. [...]

Eight years ago, Ernst sued Alberta Environment, the Energy Resources Conservation Board (which has since become the Alberta Energy Regulator) and Encana, one of Canada's largest unconventional gas drillers. She claimed her well water had been contaminated by fracking and government agencies had failed to investigate the problems.

But the regulator argued that it couldn't be sued because it had an immunity clause that protected it from civil action.

After an Alberta Court of Appeal agreed, Ernst's lawyers appealed the matter to the Supreme Court in 2014.

Initially three provincial governments and the federal government announced their intention to intervene in the case.

"But once they looked at the arguments, they withdrew," said Murray Klippenstein, another of Ernst's lawyers, after yesterday's hearing.

"So there was no government here to support the argument of the [regulator]," added Klippenstein. "It kind of shows in a common sense sort of way how ridiculous the position is."

The case made legal history, too. "This is the first time the Supreme Court has heard a case about human rights with an environmental context," noted Lynda Collins, a professor of law at the University of Ottawa's Centre for Environmental Law and Global Studies.

She said the case concerns the right of a citizen to pinpoint environmental wrongs, such as groundwater contamination, without being penalized by a regulatory body.

Whenever a regulator allegedly takes punitive measures against a citizen addressing key environmental issues in the public interest, "you have a serious allegation," added Collins. [...]

The case is being closely watched by Canada's oil and gas industry. In 2014, Borden Ladner Gervais, Canada's largest national full-service law firm, included the Ernst case in a top 10 list of important judicial decisions affecting the energy industry.

"The Ernst case has brought into focus the potential for regulator or provincial liability arising out of oil and gas operations.... If Ernst proceeds to trial, it will likely provide more guidance on the scope of the duty of care and the standard of care required by the province and the oil and gas operator to discharge their duties in the context of hydraulic fracturing."

The fracking industry has been the subject of scores of lawsuits across North America. Landowners have sued over property damage and personal injury related to industry-caused earthquakes, air pollution and the contamination of groundwater.

In one major Texas case, a jury awarded one family $3 million. The verdict found that Aruba Petroleum "intentionally created a private nuisance" though its drilling, fracking and production activities at 21 gas wells near the Parrs' Wise County home over a three-year period between 2008 and 2011. [...]"

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Climate change could dry up global power production, study warns

Climate change could dry up global power production, study warns | Green Living | Scoop.it

Thousands of power plants around the world may face severe reductions in their ability to generate electricity by mid-century due to water shortages, according to new research.

Hydro- and thermo-electric (nuclear, fossil-fuelled, biomass-fuelled) power plants are vulnerable to dwindling rivers and reservoirs as the planet warms, a study published in Nature on Monday said.

These technologies, which provide 98% of global electricity supply, depend on abundant water to cool generators and pump power at dams.

Lower river levels and warmer water temperatures could reduce generating capacity by as much as 86% in thermo-electric- and 74% in hydro plants, according to researchers at Wageningen University and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Smart D Home Blog: Smart Buildings are simply generating Smart Cities

Smart D Home Blog: Smart Buildings are simply generating Smart Cities | Green Living | Scoop.it
In order for a city to provide access to its intelligence behind the knowledge and become a Smart City, the development of the Intelligence System that connects the central nervous system to a brain is required-- enter smart buildings.
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The benefits of a Smart Light Bulb - Smart D Home Store's Blog

The benefits of a Smart Light Bulb - Smart D Home Store's Blog | Green Living | Scoop.it
Have you embraced smart home technology? If not, you should learn and read this article about the enormous benefits of the smart bulb. Well, this is where a Smart light bulb would come in handy. Below you will discover more information and the benefits of a Smart bulb. Smart Light Bulb It’s integrated with a …
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A satellite due to be launched into orbit Tuesday will boost Europe's ability to monitor environmental changes and provide early warning of possible migrant flows

A satellite due to be launched into orbit Tuesday will boost Europe's ability to monitor environmental changes and provide early warning of possible migrant flows | Green Living | Scoop.it
BERLIN (AP) — A satellite due to be launched into orbit Tuesday will boost Europe's ability to monitor environmental changes and provide early warning of possible migrant flows.

The European Space Agency says Sentinel-3A is one of more than a dozen satellites that will make up the most sophisticated Earth observation system ever launched.

Two satellites already in orbit are equipped with radar and high-resolution cameras, to which Sentinel-3A will add sophisticated instruments for measuring sea and surface temperatures.

Josef Aschbacher, who oversees the Earth observation program, says the satellite will be able to spot upcoming droughts and even identify spots where people may be gathering to cross the Mediterranean to Europe.

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Community Composting Grows from a Seed into a Movement

Community Composting Grows from a Seed into a Movement | Green Living | Scoop.it
Three years ago, Dustin Fedako attended the US Composting Council’s annual conference. As founder of Compost Pedallers, a bike-powered compost recycling program in Austin, Texas, Fedako didn’t know what to expect from the conference, which is geared toward the industrial composting model. He just wanted to “sponge up as much as he could.” He learned a lot and he also spent a lot of time explaining what community composting is.

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By 2050, there will be more plastic than fish in the world’s oceans, study says

By 2050, there will be more plastic than fish in the world’s oceans, study says | Green Living | Scoop.it

There is a lot of plastic in the world’s oceans.

It coagulates into great floating “garbage patches” that cover large swaths of the Pacific. It washes up on urban beaches and remote islands, tossed about in the waves and transported across incredible distances before arriving, unwanted, back on land. It has wound up in the stomachs of more than half the world’s sea turtles and nearly all of its marine birds, studies say. And if it was bagged up and arranged across all of the world’s shorelines, we could build a veritable plastic barricade between ourselves and the sea.

But that quantity pales in comparison with the amount that the World Economic Forum expects will be floating into the oceans by the middle of the century.

If we keep producing (and failing to properly dispose of) plastics at predicted rates, plastics in the ocean will outweigh fish pound for pound in 2050, the nonprofit foundation said in a report Tuesday.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Solar Impulse 2: Around the World without Fuel or Fear – from Davos

Solar Impulse 2: Around the World without Fuel or Fear – from Davos | Green Living | Scoop.it
Learn how breakthroughs in clean technology can take us to new heights with the explorers who are set to break the record for the world’s longest solo flight using only solar energy. André Borschberg and Bertrand Piccard took off from Abu Dhabi in March and aim to complete the circumnavigation of the Earth by returning to the UAE. Watch them speak live at the World Economic Forum in Davos at 12.45pm.

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More Than 1,000 Sustainability Reports Expected in Next Two Years in North America: CSE Research

More Than 1,000 Sustainability Reports Expected in Next Two Years in North America: CSE Research | Green Living | Scoop.it
there is a clearly visible trend of public companies (82%) to publish sustainability reports in order to disclose information and be transparent about their sustainability performance. What is also interesting is that there is a growing trend for Small-Medium Enterprises to publish sustainability reports in order to increase their transparency, attract customers and grow their business.

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EcoVadis's curator insight, January 19, 4:38 PM

Things are turning around in the US for sustainability...

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Photos of Paris’ Monumental Housing Projects That Challenge Ideas About How the French Live

Photos of Paris’ Monumental Housing Projects That Challenge Ideas About How the French Live | Green Living | Scoop.it

Since 2011, French photographer Laurent Kronental has been working on an ongoing series documenting life on the edge of Paris in the “grands ensembles.” These monumental housing projects were built between the 1950s and the 1980s on the outskirts of major French cities as answers to a dearth of housing and an influx of foreign migrants. Aging monolithic concrete structures with an almost alien presence in the French landscape, they are a far cry from the Haussmannian apartment blocks that dominate central Paris and the world’s collective imagination about how the French live.

 

Kronental said in an artist’s statement that he is “fascinated by these projects’ ambitious and dated modernistic features” that “are today often stigmatized by the media and marginalized by public opinion.” He hopes that his images provide “sharp contrast with these cliché views” and celebrate the often overlooked “urban veterans who have aged there.”

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Bio-Powered Chips Might One Day Fit Inside Cells

Bio-Powered Chips Might One Day Fit Inside Cells | Green Living | Scoop.it

For the first time, researchers have developed a microchip that is powered by the same energy-rich molecules that fuel living cells, researchers say. Thisadvance could one day lead to devices that are implanted within cells and harvest biological energy to operate.


The molecule adenosine triphosphate (ATP) stores chemical energy and is used inside cells to ferry energy from where it is generated to where it is consumed. The new microchip relies on enzymes known as sodium-potassium ATPases. These molecules break down ATP to release energy the enzymes use to pump sodium and potassium ions across membranes, generating an electrical potential during the process.


“Ion pumps are electronics-like components in living systems,” says study senior author Ken Shepard, an electrical engineer at Columbia University in New York. Shepard and his colleagues detailed their findings in the 7 December edition of the journal Nature Communications.


The researchers embedded sodium-potassium ATPases taken from pig brains in artificial fatty membranes. There were more than 2 million of these molecules active per square millimeter of the membranes, about 5 percent of the density naturally occurring in mammalian nerve fibers.


In the presence of ATP, these ion pumps generated 78 millivolts. A “biocell” of two membranes provides enough of a voltage to operate a CMOS integrated circuit. The ion pumps have a chemical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency of of 14.9 percent.


“These ion pumps generated an electrical field that we harnessed to power a solid-state system,” Shepard says.


Since ATP is only really found within cells and not in the bloodstream, Shepard cautions that this new system is not a way to power conventional implantable medical devices such as pacemakers.


“However, such a system might power an implant small enough to sit inside a cell,” Shepard says. “Solid-state materials are already used in nanoparticles for various therapeutic and imaging purposes in the body, but those are all just passive materials. Our idea is to make something that would have the ability to compute and act, to make decisions and then actuate in some way.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Climate Post: Climate and Energy of Focus in Obama's Final State of the Union

The Climate Post: Climate and Energy of Focus in Obama's Final State of the Union | Green Living | Scoop.it
President Obama laid out four big questions the United States has to answer in his nearly hour-long final State of the Union address Tuesday night. One of those four points: How do we make technology work for us, and not against us, especially when it comes to solving urgent issues like climate change?

"Sixty years ago, when the Russians beat us into space, we didn't deny Sputnik was up there," Obama said. "We didn't argue about the science, or shrink our research and development budget. We built a space program almost overnight, and twelve years later, we were walking on the moon ... Look, if anybody still wants to dispute the science around climate change, have at it. You'll be pretty lonely, because you'll be debating our military, most of America's business leaders, the majority of the American people, almost the entire scientific community, and 200 nations around the world who agree it's a problem and intend to solve it."

The administration's push to continue making new discoveries came in a speech optimistic about America's destiny and referencing the president's accomplishmentsin office the last seven years.

Obama also presented a vision for our energy future.

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Why climate change is an ethical problem

Why climate change is an ethical problem | Green Living | Scoop.it

The question of what to do is a moral one. What values will shape how we answer it?

 

Climate change presents a severe ethical challenge, forcing us to confront difficult questions as individual moral agents, and even more so as members of larger political systems. It is genuinely global and seriouslyintergenerational, and crosses species boundaries. It also takes place in a setting where existing institutions and theories are weak, proving little ethical guidance.intergenerational, and crosses species boundaries. It also takes place in a setting where existing institutions and theories are weak, proving little ethical guidance.

 

A central component of this perfect moral storm is the threat of a tyranny of the contemporary, a collective action problem in which earlier generations exploit the future by taking modest benefits for themselves now while passing on potentially catastrophic costs later.


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Vermont power line approval big step for Canadian power

Vermont power line approval big step for Canadian power | Green Living | Scoop.it

Long-term plans to bring renewable Canadian electricity to the power-hungry markets of southern New England got a big boost when Vermont utility regulators approved a plan to build a 1,000-megawatt transmission line down Lake Champlain and across the state to feed the regional power grid, experts say.

TDI New England is still awaiting its final federal permits before it can begin construction and contracts to deliver power, but the system could become the first piece of a system to supply renewable electricity to Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island.

Unlike the Northern Pass project proposed for northern New Hampshire, the $1.2 billion, privately funded TDI project faced no significant opposition in Vermont, something unusual for the state.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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