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green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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Colourful City Clock Diagram Depicts The Pulse Of The City

Colourful City Clock Diagram Depicts The Pulse Of The City | green infographics | Scoop.it

The folks over at Spacing Vancouver have compiled this multi-layered diagram which depicts the operating hours of every business within 200m from the Broadway-City Hall station on Cambie Street. The purpose of this time diagram is to show how "this continuous flow orchestrates the city's metabolism." Check out the complete story from Spacing Vancouver over here.

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All of Earth's land mammals by total weight in one graph

All of Earth's land mammals by total weight in one graph | green infographics | Scoop.it

Randall Munroe, a former NASA roboticist who nows draws clever geeky webcomics at XKCD, used data from Vaclav Smil's The Earth's Biosphere: Evolution, Dynamics, and Change ("plus a few other sources") to create a visualization of all of Earth's land mammals, which include us, by weight. It does certainly put things in perspective, especially when you compare wild land mammals to us and our livestock and pets.

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Birds' migration: visualized

Birds' migration: visualized | green infographics | Scoop.it

This project is designed to visualise the basic datas of selected migrant birds. Four elements was visualised: the birds' wingspan and weight, the distance and period of their migration.

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Putting All the World’s Water into a Big Cube

Putting All the World’s Water into a Big Cube | green infographics | Scoop.it

All the water underground, on the surface, and in the atmosphere amounts to about 332 million cubic miles. That makes a cube with a side of 693 miles, whose base stretches from Indianapolis to Denver. You couldn't even fill the Pacific with the water in that cube, let alone everything else.  

So, the big takeaway here is that the Earth’s oceans are nothing more than a thin film on the surface of the Earth, relatively speaking.


And how big would a cube of just the fresh water be?  It would have sides 202 miles long and sit nicely on top of Iowa.

And the drinkable water cube? Its sides would be 29 miles long and it would fit into Rhode Island.

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Visualizing How New York City Heats Up In The Summertime

Visualizing How New York City Heats Up In The Summertime | green infographics | Scoop.it

If you find the summer heat hard to take, cities are the worst places to be. Studies show that urban spaces can be up to three degrees hotter than surrounding areas. That's because of the "heat island effect"--which is what you get from paving every available surface with heat-absorbing asphalt and concrete.


Using a thermal camera, these graphics by artist-researcher Nickolay Lamm explain how a city gets hot and stays hot.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 12:39 AM

Consequences of urbanisation

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Visualizing 100 Years Of Climate Data

Visualizing 100 Years Of Climate Data | green infographics | Scoop.it

What does 100 years worth of climate data look like when rendered in an interactive, color-coded map? A continental tug-of-war between red (for heat) and blue (for cold), as seasons come and go and cold air replaces the warm.

The infographic is the work of data visualization studio Halftone, whose principals originally pursued the idea of making a map to visualize data about coffee production against key environmental factors, like temperature and precipitation.


"Our goal with this project was not to facilitate precise analysis, but to expose how every single month produces a unique and beautiful artwork through our Voronoi tessellated approximation of a heat map," write the creators. "The underlying map of satellite imagery and major geographic features adds a second layer for exploration."

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Stunning Satellite Images of Earth

Stunning Satellite Images of Earth | green infographics | Scoop.it

Of all the cosmic bodies studied in the long history of astronomy and space travel, the one that got the least attention was the one that ought to matter most to us—Earth.

That changed when NASA created the Landsat program, a series of satellites that would perpetually orbit our planet, looking not out but down. Landsat was built for public monitoring of how the human species was altering the surface of the planet. The space agency, along with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), has accumulated a stunning catalog of images that, when riffled through and stitched together, create a high-definition slide show of our rapidly changing Earth, which for the first time date all the way back to 1984.


These Timelapse pictures tell the pretty and not-so-pretty story of a finite planet and how its residents are treating it — razing even as we build, destroying even as we preserve.

Visit the article link to see an exclusive timelapse of climate change, deforestation and urban sprawl unfolding as Earth evolves over 30 years...


Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Moss's insight:

The impact of global urbanization, deforestation, and resource depletion are expressed in dramatic satellite imagery and timelapse video of a changing earth.

These depictions show the massive scale of the environmental impact of climate change, rising sea levels and urban growth, and underscore the need to develop a viable plan for addressing these issues.

Many thanks to Seth Dixon for sharing this resource.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, May 11, 2013 4:15 PM

I suggest you watch to see the spatial patterns emerge!

 

Tracy Young's curator insight, May 12, 2013 3:12 PM

Very useful visual tool for exploring patterns of change

oyndrila's curator insight, May 17, 2013 10:24 AM

Exciting!!

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People Movin'

People Movin' | green infographics | Scoop.it

"A visualization of migration flows"


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 7, 2013 11:09 AM

This is a great way to visualize global migration patterns.  Where are people migrating to Brazil coming from?  What countries are Brazilians migrating to?  Here are the answers to these types of questions for every country.  


Tags: migration, population, statistics, visualization, unit 2 population.

Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé's curator insight, February 8, 2013 1:14 AM

Es un grafic molt atractiu. Interessant per muntar treballs de grup, investigants païssos concrets

Peter Farárik's comment, February 8, 2013 6:20 AM
Perfect!
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Go Green! Bountiful Benefits of Responsible Recycling - infographic

Go Green!  Bountiful Benefits of Responsible Recycling - infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

Wood, plastic, paper, rock, and metal are commonly thrown away after a construction project. If they were recycled, though, they could make mulch, fuel, furniture, toilet paper, newspapers, and even roofs.


Check out this infographic from a waste management company in New Jersey to learn more...

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Mercor's curator insight, February 8, 2013 5:34 AM

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Climate Change and Human Responsibility

Climate Change and Human Responsibility | green infographics | Scoop.it
It can’t be denied any longer: Sea levels are rising, major droughts are continuing, and record hot summers are being experienced all around the world. Climate change is real and, as residents of Earth, we have a responsibility to our planet to do something about it. A recent study conducted by Yale University and George Mason University finds that, for the first time since the research began in 2008, the majority of Americans believe that global warming is mostly a man-made phenomenon.

As sobering images of catastrophes are making headlines, this graphic looks at how people are recognizing that the effects of their actions aren’t just an increasing danger to the world but are a direct threat to the future for themselves and their families.
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Jim Gramata's curator insight, December 14, 2012 11:35 AM

Decisions have consequences. In some cases irreversible and significant. Changing Tides....great post

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World Supplies of Non-Renewable Resources, Visualized [Environmental Infographic]

World Supplies of Non-Renewable Resources, Visualized [Environmental Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Politicians and oil companies might waste time debating whether or not we’ve reached peak oil. What they ignore is that we run out completely in under 40 years’ time, by which time a third of the planet’s biodiversity will be lost.

In the meantime, tantalum, that great mainstay of mobile telecoms, will last only a few years more and run out just in time to celebrate the planet breaking the 2oC barrier in 2060.
There’s so much more words could say, but this, a very relevant and informative environmensl visualization, says is so much better...

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The Power of EPAct : Paid From Savings

The Power of EPAct : Paid From Savings | green infographics | Scoop.it

When Sustainable Industry Solutions learned that the EPAct legislation to help facilities save energy and money was set to expire in 2013, they knew what they had to do…

With the help of EPAct man, they have created a great infographic explaining the current EPAct legislation and how the extended proposal for 2016 could help businesses conserve energy and save billions of dollars in the process.


Visit the link or energy.gov for more information...

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Hydro-Logic: Balancing Limited Water Supply with Increased Demand

Hydro-Logic: Balancing Limited Water Supply with Increased Demand | green infographics | Scoop.it

The hydrological water year starts every autumn on 1 October and extends to the following 30 September. The available description from the USGS does not explain why this is the period considered, but there is some natural logic to the hydrological year: with the end of summer comes the (approximate) end of intense evaporation from reservoirs and the beginning of the seasons in which the net water balance in a watershed is generally positive. That is, in general, precipitation > evaporation.

Normally, from the beginning through about two-thirds of the water year, water is stored in the higher reaches of large watersheds as snowpack, which melts and runs off through the rest of the water year. Stream flows generally continue to drop from October through winter, but then rise significantly at the start of the melt season. That imbalance applies over a period longer than a single storm and for the whole watershed, not just on a random wet or dry day in one's own neighborhood.


One of the more interesting areas to observe the water year is the Colorado River Basin (CRB) in the southwestern US. The Colorado River has become so strictly regulated, in part because of gross over-allocation, over nearly a century of intensive use that it has become what I think is a consummate example of the coupled natural - human system...


Visit the link for a closer look at this detailed map of the CRB natural and engineered systems designed for National Geographic. Also, obtain more information regarding statistics on CRB flows and the status of reservoirs and other river operations, including links to various organizations and resources for further study...

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Forests & Big Data: 5 Deforestation Hotspots Flying Under the Radar

Forests & Big Data: 5 Deforestation Hotspots Flying Under the Radar | green infographics | Scoop.it

We are still losing forests and trees much faster than they can regrow. In fact, we are losing 50 soccer fields worth of trees every minute!

Many are working to reverse tree cover loss in the world’s largest remaining forests: the Amazon Basin, Congo Basin, tropical forests of Indonesia and the vast boreal forests of Russia and Canada. These are worthy goals, considering that just two countries—Brazil and Indonesia—still account for about half of all tropical forest loss.

But several hugely important deforestation hotspots are still flying under the radar. These forest areas don’t get the headlines or resources of the major tropical regions, but are seeing alarming trends or have lost much of their tree cover already.


Visit the link for more the latest data from Global Forest Watch, an online forest monitoring and alert system.

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All the Rivers in the U.S. on a Single Interactive Map

All the Rivers in the U.S. on a Single Interactive Map | green infographics | Scoop.it

A recent report by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency concluded that 55 percent of U.S. rivers and streams are in poor condition. Many of us might not realize just how many rivers and streams there are in the United States.

This map gives you an idea of how many there are; visit the link to see many beautiful different visualizations of rivers in the U.S., as well as an interactive map that you can play with and zoom in and out of to see the rivers in your area.

All river data comes from the NHDPlus dataset, a geo-spatial, hydrologic framework dataset envisioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | green infographics | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 6:33 AM

The human popluation debate will always seem to be an issue. One can almost assume that the less developed countries are going to have the highest popluation but the most problems as well. A country that is classified as less developed are most definitely going to have low incomes due to the low number of jobs available, poor human development because there isn't enough people to be taking care of each other. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 4:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

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Global warming in one unmistakably compelling chart

Global warming in one unmistakably compelling chart | green infographics | Scoop.it
If you have any doubt the balance of the globe has warmed over the last century, view this chart.


Produced by NASA, the chart illustrates how temperatures have compared to “normal” from 1880 to present, from pole to pole.

From the 1880 to the 1920s, blue and green shades dominate the chart, signaling cooler than normal temperatures in that era.  Then, from the 1930s to the 1970s, warmer yellow, oranges, and reds shades ooze in, balancing the cooler shades.

The rapid warming at the northern high latitudes especially jumps out in recent decades, reflecting “Arctic amplification” or more intense warming in the Arctic.  Although the warming is most pronounced up north, it is apparent at almost every latitude.

But since the 1970s, the blue and green shades rapidly erode and oranges and reds take over, dramatically.

Find more information at the link...

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IOANNIS APOSTOLOU's curator insight, September 13, 2013 6:26 AM

Global warming facts!

Owen Roberts, BSc, MBA's curator insight, September 23, 2013 5:16 AM

GLOBAL WARMING - Here is an chart developed by NASA that shows how much global temperatures have changed during the last 140 years.  Quite compelling. 

Hein Holthuizen's comment, September 29, 2013 1:00 AM
There is no doubt about an general increase of temperature. Whether it is worrysome is not to be seen on this small scale. We had colder periodes like ice ages and now we are likely in a interglacial. So global temperatures change over time. Nice picture btw.
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New York's Bike Sharing Scheme, Visualized

New York's Bike Sharing Scheme, Visualized | green infographics | Scoop.it

New York's Citi Bike scheme has been up and running for a couple of months now—which means there's a glut of data available to analyze. This interactive New Yorker viz shows how the bikes were used every 15 minutes between June 8th and July 8th.

It does look a little chaotic, but there are some interesting trends in there. You can make out stacks of commuters in the week—especially toward the Financial District—and longer slower journeys at the weekends. Most fun, though, as Verge points out, is the mass migration westward before the July 4th fireworks on the Hudson. What else can you see?

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The Depth of Oil Wells

The Depth of Oil Wells | green infographics | Scoop.it
Just how far down do oil wells actually go? We will show you...
Lauren Moss's insight:

Visit the article for resources and useful links related to the oil industry and the environment...

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Visualizing a Walkable City

Visualizing a Walkable City | green infographics | Scoop.it

The city of Pontevedra in northwest Spain has become a leader in walker-friendly urban policy over the past 15 years. As the capital of its province, county and municipality, Pontevedra attracted enough automobile commuters each day to overwhelm its antiquated streets.

In response, instead of razing old buildings and constructing bigger roads, the city council widened sidewalks, established a free bike-lending service, installed speed bumps and set a speed limits of 30 kilometers per hour. They even banned motorized transport in sections of Pontevedra. Walking zones now extend from the historic center to streets and squares in newer neighborhoods. Although the driving ban initially faced resistance, it is now broadly supported and has become an essential part of the city's identity as an attractive place to live...


To further improve walkability, Pontevedra's city council produced a map that visualizes the distances and travel times between key places on foot. Known as Metrominuto, the map has color-coded lines that resemble those of a subway guide. Free parking areas are marked to encourage visitors to leave their cars outside the city center. Metrominuto reminds residents and visitors that many automobile trips can be made in a more convenient, environmentally friendly and healthy way by walking.

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ryanleonard's comment, April 20, 2013 4:25 AM
nice
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Watch 62 Years of Global Warming in 13 Seconds

Watch 62 Years of Global Warming in 13 Seconds | green infographics | Scoop.it

An amazing 13-second NASA animation depicting how the globe has warmed during the period of 1950 to 2012.


From our friends at NASA comes this amazing 13-second animation that depicts how temperatures around the globe have warmed since 1950. You’ll note an acceleration of the temperature trend in the late 1970s as greenhouse gas emissions from energy production increased worldwide and clean air laws reduced emissions of pollutants that had a cooling effect on the climate, and thus were masking some of the global warming signal.


The data come from NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York (GISS), which monitors global surface temperatures. As NASA notes, “All 10 of the warmest years in the GISS analysis have occurred since 1998, continuing a trend of temperatures well above the mid-20th century average.

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Kos's curator insight, January 27, 2013 4:23 PM

Amazing......

Diedert Debusscher's curator insight, January 28, 2013 1:25 AM

Why we should care about global warming. And keep working on solutions (they exist).

Mercor's curator insight, January 31, 2013 6:55 AM

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Visualizing Paper Waste | Infographics

Visualizing Paper Waste | Infographics | green infographics | Scoop.it

Are you still printing employee handbooks?  Are you still hanging on to that filing cabinet?  Are you still filling out employee paperwork by hand?

 

Aside from being a huge burden on the environment, it’s a drain on your time and your money.

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NYC's Daily Carbon Footprint Visualized

NYC's Daily Carbon Footprint Visualized | green infographics | Scoop.it

With one of the best public transportations systems in the world, individual New Yorkers tend to have smaller carbon footprints than typical Suburbanites, but with a population of over 8.2 million, the carbon footprint for the city itself is pretty outrageous.


This visualization shows what it would look like if all of the carbon dioxide emitted from vehicles, buildings, factories, and people could be captured in “bubbles.” Each turquoise orb represents one ton of CO2, which would fill a sphere with a diameter of 33 feet, and as of now two are released every second in the Big Apple!


Stop by the link to view the animated infographic...

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Smart Grid – Where Power is Going [infographic]

Smart Grid – Where Power is Going [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it
Why should an everyday homeowner care that the smart grid can increase the U.S. electric grid's efficiency by 9 percent?

And what does that amount to in terms of energy and monetary savings? This infographic visually highlights those savings and what they actually mean to consumers.


The effort aims to connect the consumer with the smart grid, by explaining it simply and driving home the many benefits of smart grid technology, including: cost savings, energy efficiency, improved outage detection and resolution, as well as environmental benefits,.

“By highlighting the conveniences and benefits the smart grid can bring to consumers, the SGCC and its members can help consumers understand the smart grid just as they understand other, consumer-friendly, ‘smart’ technologies they wouldn’t consider living without – such as a smart phone, computer or television.”

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Don't Worry, Drive On: Fossil Fools & Fracking Lies

Don't Worry, Drive On: Fossil Fools & Fracking Lies | green infographics | Scoop.it
Two things never seem to change about crude oil: the constant warnings that our thirst for it is unsustainable, and the fact that we continue to use it...

 

These two troubling trends are issues which should be dealt with, and quickly, as this intriguing motion graphic from The Post Carbon Institute points out.
They make the case that in recent years the political rhetoric has increased, pointing to so-called “new” technologies as solutions to the un-sustainability of fossil fuels. One such technology, fracking, aims high pressure water and chemicals into our soils, releasing both oil and natural gasses. In fact an old technology, a multitude of problems arise from its use, not least of which is the pollution of ground waters and the destabilization of soils resulting in earthquakes in previously stable areas. As if that wasn’t bad enough, the technology is expensive to use and only begins to makes sense financially in a world with high enough fuel prices – the world of today.


Isn’t it time we start getting realistic about our true fuel situation? Watch the video at the link for more information, then check out The Post Carbon Institute to show your support...

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