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creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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11,000 Years' Worth of Climate Data

11,000 Years' Worth of Climate Data | green infographics | Scoop.it

New research takes the deepest dive ever into historic climate records.


Back in 1999 Penn State climate scientist Michael Mann released the climate change movement's most potent symbol: The "hockey stick," a line graph of global temperature over the last 1,500 years that shows an unmistakable, massive uptick in the twentieth century when humans began to dump large amounts of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. It's among the most compelling bits of proof out there that human beings are behind global warming, and as such has become a target on Mann's back for climate denialists looking to draw a bead on scientists.


Now it's gotten a makeover: A study published in Science reconstructs global temperatures further back than ever before -- a full 11,300 years. The new analysis finds that the only problem with Mann's hockey stick was that its handle was about 9,000 years too short...

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Climate Change at the Neighborhood Level

Climate Change at the Neighborhood Level | green infographics | Scoop.it
Researchers in Los Angeles try out a more granular approach to temperature change estimates.

Most climate maps break down the world into grid squares 200 kilometers wide. That's great for creating a regional picture, but too big for what's happening at the city & neighborhood levels. New work coming out of the UCLA Dept of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences greatly improves that resolution, predicting temperature changes in grid sections just two km wide in the Los Angeles region.

The new report, 'Mid-Century Warming in the Los Angeles Region' finds that climate change will likely affect some parts of Los Angeles more heavily than others, with potential temperature increases of between 1.7 and 7.5 degrees F. Inland areas and places at high elevation are predicted to see temperatures rise 20 to 50 percent more than areas near the coast or within the L.A. basin.

This more method of evaluation is an important tool for planners and policymakers, who would like to have more precise information about how to respond to changing temperature levels within cities, and ideally, to pinpoint efforts aimed at reducing those potential impacts...

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