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green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
Curated by Lauren Moss
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Does Your State Have the Most—or the Fewest—LEED-Certified Homes?

Does Your State Have the Most—or the Fewest—LEED-Certified Homes? | green infographics | Scoop.it
There are 150,000 LEED-certified housing units across the world, according to a new report. Is your state in the top 10 or the bottom 10 for the U.S.?

There are now more than 150,000 LEED-certified housing units worldwide, according to the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED in Motion: Residential report. Where does your home state stack up? Visit the link for the top 10 and bottom 10 states per certified units.

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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, July 8, 4:25 AM

Another example of the growing coastal-inland divergence in almost all aspects of our society.

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The Neighborhood Data Portal Every City Needs

The Neighborhood Data Portal Every City Needs | green infographics | Scoop.it
Los Angeles rolls out interactive neighborhood health profiles covering everything from crime stats to obesity rates.

As the open data movement has matured, public city-wide vital stats have come to feel more like a citizen's right than a civic innovation. This is where things should head next: Take all of that data, map it, connect the dots between public health, land use, economics, education, crime and housing. And portray those patterns – and the inequality they often reveal – down to the neighborhood level.


Los Angeles has recently done just this, rolling out a web tool as part of its Plan for a Healthy Los Angeles that maps a tremendous number of metrics about life in the region, at both the city and neighborhood scales. Just a sampling of the dozens of metrics, via the portal from the L.A. Department of City Planning, the L.A. County Department of Public Health and The California Endowment:

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50 Incredible Facts About Earth [Infographic]

50 Incredible Facts About Earth [Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Who knew that if all the water on the Earth were scrunched up into a ball it would only measure 860km in diameter? How long can a human being survive in space unprotected?

These fifty incredible facts about Earth will provide the answer, along with some answers to questions that you’ve probably never asked yourself.

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Green Building to Accelerate, Survey Finds

Green Building to Accelerate, Survey Finds | green infographics | Scoop.it

Construction companies worldwide are shifting their business toward green building, with 51 percent of respondents to a survey by research firm McGraw-Hill Construction saying they expect more than 60 percent of their work to be green by 2015.

This is a significant increase from the 28 percent that said the same for their work in 2013 and the 13 percent in 2008, according to the company’s latest SmartMarket Report, World Green Building Trends.

This trend is not localized to one country or region; fom 2012 to 2015, the number of firms anticipating that more than 60 percent of their work will be green more than triples in South Africa; more than doubles in Germany, Norway and Brazil; and grows between 33 and 68 percent in the United States, Singapore, the United Kingdom, the United Arab Emirates and Australia, the report says...

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Jim Gramata's curator insight, March 5, 2013 8:50 PM

I think this will be the true global tipping point once big business sees there is so much money to be made in the green movement. It remains to be seen if that ends up being a good thing but the momentum is shifting and that is certainly good.

 

Mercor's curator insight, March 11, 2013 1:55 PM

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Infographic: The Car of the Future

Infographic: The Car of the Future | green infographics | Scoop.it

Will the steering wheel, brakes and gas pedal be replaced with sensors and software?

Cars that talk to each other are being tested in Ann Arbor, Mich., in the largest vehicle-to-vehicle pilot in the nation, and testing of self-driving cars has been approved in both California and Nevada. In fact, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) predicts that in 2040, 75 percent of cars on the road will be self-driving.

A recent press release on Top 10 Future Car Technologiesfrom Total Car Score mirrors much of the information from the following infographic from InsuranceQuotes.com, which shows what other features cars in the future might have. Think super fuel efficiency, media on demand, voice control and zero maintenance...

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Mercor's curator insight, January 31, 2013 10:04 AM

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Climate Change and Human Responsibility

Climate Change and Human Responsibility | green infographics | Scoop.it
It can’t be denied any longer: Sea levels are rising, major droughts are continuing, and record hot summers are being experienced all around the world. Climate change is real and, as residents of Earth, we have a responsibility to our planet to do something about it. A recent study conducted by Yale University and George Mason University finds that, for the first time since the research began in 2008, the majority of Americans believe that global warming is mostly a man-made phenomenon.

As sobering images of catastrophes are making headlines, this graphic looks at how people are recognizing that the effects of their actions aren’t just an increasing danger to the world but are a direct threat to the future for themselves and their families.
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Jim Gramata's curator insight, December 14, 2012 2:35 PM

Decisions have consequences. In some cases irreversible and significant. Changing Tides....great post

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How Much Have We Polluted? [infographic]

How Much Have We Polluted? [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

How Much Have We Polluted?

An infographic added to Visual.ly by ElkanoData...

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Hydro-Logic: Balancing Limited Water Supply with Increased Demand

Hydro-Logic: Balancing Limited Water Supply with Increased Demand | green infographics | Scoop.it

The hydrological water year starts every autumn on 1 October and extends to the following 30 September. The available description from the USGS does not explain why this is the period considered, but there is some natural logic to the hydrological year: with the end of summer comes the (approximate) end of intense evaporation from reservoirs and the beginning of the seasons in which the net water balance in a watershed is generally positive. That is, in general, precipitation > evaporation.

Normally, from the beginning through about two-thirds of the water year, water is stored in the higher reaches of large watersheds as snowpack, which melts and runs off through the rest of the water year. Stream flows generally continue to drop from October through winter, but then rise significantly at the start of the melt season. That imbalance applies over a period longer than a single storm and for the whole watershed, not just on a random wet or dry day in one's own neighborhood.


One of the more interesting areas to observe the water year is the Colorado River Basin (CRB) in the southwestern US. The Colorado River has become so strictly regulated, in part because of gross over-allocation, over nearly a century of intensive use that it has become what I think is a consummate example of the coupled natural - human system...


Visit the link for a closer look at this detailed map of the CRB natural and engineered systems designed for National Geographic. Also, obtain more information regarding statistics on CRB flows and the status of reservoirs and other river operations, including links to various organizations and resources for further study...

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Issues from Global Population Growth

Find In-depth Review, Video And Infographic On World Population. http://www.mapsofworld.com/poll/can-world-population-be-controlled.html Learn more about pop...

 

This video displays some intriguing statistics about global population growth.  Equally important the video explores some concerns that are presented with a large population.  Click on the above link to view all the images as one long infographic.   


Via Seth Dixon
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The Most Bike-Friendly States In The U.S.

The Most Bike-Friendly States In The U.S. | green infographics | Scoop.it

Washington, Minnesota, and Wisconsin are the best states for cycling in the United States. Alabama, Montana, and Kentucky are the worst. States like Florida and New York fall somewhere in the middle.

That's according to The League of American Bicyclists, which every year ranks states on their friendliness to cycling. Washington keeps its No. 1 status from last year, with Wisconsin moving up five places. Montana has dropped 10 places to 49th. Meanwhile, California and Ohio are the most improved from 2013. The latter state is up 16 places, from 32nd to 16th.

Find more deatils at the link or see the full report and methodology here.

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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | green infographics | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:33 AM

The human popluation debate will always seem to be an issue. One can almost assume that the less developed countries are going to have the highest popluation but the most problems as well. A country that is classified as less developed are most definitely going to have low incomes due to the low number of jobs available, poor human development because there isn't enough people to be taking care of each other. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 7:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

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E-Hazards: Manifest Tragedy [Infographic]

E-Hazards: Manifest Tragedy [Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

As technology continues to progress and the lifespan of consumer electronics continues to shorten, there is a significant problem that society is left to ponder: e-waste. The steady influx of new technologies being adopted by more people presents the growing challenge of what to do with the old electronics.

When these electronics end up in landfills and are improperly recycled, they jeopardize the well-being of the individuals involved and of the environment around them. It would be naïve to think the problems caused by these obsolete electronics stop with the country producing the waste or that it is a contained problem.


This infographic explores the shrinking product cycles of electronic devices, the mounting challenge of hazardous e-waste, and how various governments, schools and professionals are becoming involved.

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People Movin'

People Movin' | green infographics | Scoop.it

"A visualization of migration flows"


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 7, 2013 2:09 PM

This is a great way to visualize global migration patterns.  Where are people migrating to Brazil coming from?  What countries are Brazilians migrating to?  Here are the answers to these types of questions for every country.  


Tags: migration, population, statistics, visualization, unit 2 population.

Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé's curator insight, February 8, 2013 4:14 AM

Es un grafic molt atractiu. Interessant per muntar treballs de grup, investigants païssos concrets

Peter Farárik's comment, February 8, 2013 9:20 AM
Perfect!
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Go Green! Bountiful Benefits of Responsible Recycling - infographic

Go Green!  Bountiful Benefits of Responsible Recycling - infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

Wood, plastic, paper, rock, and metal are commonly thrown away after a construction project. If they were recycled, though, they could make mulch, fuel, furniture, toilet paper, newspapers, and even roofs.


Check out this infographic from a waste management company in New Jersey to learn more...

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Mercor's curator insight, February 8, 2013 8:34 AM

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Water: Global facts + statistics [infographic]

Water: Global facts + statistics [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Ever notice how we ask for “just water” at a restaurant? Like the source of all life is somehow inferior to soda or a glass of wine (both of which are mostly water)? A new infographic gives you just about every fact you need to know about water… including the ways we’re wasting it.

Take a look, and stop by the original article to share any other facts about water you wished more people knew. 

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Frack-Free Colorado Highlights Natural Gas Fracking Facts (Infographic)

Frack-Free Colorado Highlights Natural Gas Fracking Facts (Infographic) | green infographics | Scoop.it
Frack-Free Colorado shares some of the startling facts of dangerous natural gas drilling.


As the battle over natural gas drilling heats up in Colorado, an upcoming event in Denver aims to unite the opposition. When you consider the startling facts and statistics presented below, it's easy to see why a united opposition is needed. Frack-Free Colorado will host energy experts, activists, musicians and citizens affected by the gas industry for a day of vocal opposition and rallying. Their new site is laid out like one big infographic, featuring a number of important information about natural gas fracking, clean energy alternatives and advice for how people can take action.

The statistics in this infographic represent a few key highlights, so make sure to check out the full site to explore links and additional resources about natural gas drilling.

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Global Warming: a new report on loss of life and global economic damage

Global Warming: a new report on loss of life and global economic damage | green infographics | Scoop.it

From devastating floods in China and the Philippines to droughts in Africa, the extreme weather patterns that hit the United States have impacted sites around the world as the face of global warming.

According to a new report, climate change has already contributed to 400,000 deaths per year and over $699 billion, 0.9 percent annually, in loss to gross domestic product (GDP). The report estimates even greater damage from air pollution caused by the burning of fossil fuels. also driving global warming.

'Climate Vulnerability Monitor: A Guide to the Cold Calculus of a Hot Planet (2nd Edition)' was written by over 50 scientists, economists and policy experts, and commissioned by 20 governments. The study calculates and compares the vulnerability of 184 countries in terms of environmental disasters, habitat change, health impact and industry stress.

Read on for statistics, implications and global health issues related to these new findings, proving that 'failing to deal with global warming will have real and lasting impacts on local communities, economies, health and safety, and people around the world.'

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Imagining a City Without Its Public Transportation

Imagining a City Without Its Public Transportation | green infographics | Scoop.it
Antos, a WMATA transportation analyst, has for the last several months been managing a study [PDF] that makes the business case for transit in the D.C. area. The agency tried to isolate the actual impact of rail lines on economic development, property values and tax revenues in the immediate vicinity around each station (they conservatively estimate that Metrorail boosts the value of property within a half mile of stations by about seven to nine percent).

But they also modeled what the region would look like if its transit never existed. And this is where things get really interesting.

WMATA took the same transportation demand model that it uses to project ridership on a new line and instead ran a couple of scenarios with the region’s transit literally turned off. All of it: the regional rail, the buses and the metro system.

"It was literally just imagining Washington, and all of a sudden, you wake up tomorrow, and the transit system isn’t there," Antos says. "What would you do?"

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