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green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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If you build it, they will come: New study shows that bike lanes increase ridership

If you build it, they will come: New study shows that bike lanes increase ridership | green infographics | Scoop.it
When people feel safer they are more likely to ride a bike, and they feel safer in bike lanes.

The idea of "vehicular cycling", where cyclists share the road with cars and act like cars, is looking sillier with every new study. A few weeks ago a study showed that a shocking 40% of cycling deaths happened when a cyclist was rear ended, usually on arterial roads. Now a new study, Lessons from the Green Lanes, provides clear evidence that separated bike lanes work really well, not only at saving lives, but in attracting more cyclists, making cyclists feel safer, and increasing economic activity.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 6, 6:59 AM

Strategies to create sustainable urban places

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From Farm to Fork: Our Toxic Food System - infographic

From Farm to Fork: Our Toxic Food System - infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

Food is the fuel we use to get our bodies into motion. 

However, with the way our current food system works, processed foods such as chips, soda, french fries, hamburgers and candy are making up a significant portion of our daily food intake. They’re readily available at every food store, and an ice cold Coca-Cola is very difficult to pass up in favor of sparkling water. The problem, though, is that it’s not even about choosing healthy options. Today, 80% of food in the U.S. is supplied by massive factory farms associated with a myriad of environmental and health risks.


Do you know where your food comes from? Or what’s in it? How is a hotdog made? Today’s conventional food system depends heavily on the use of toxic chemicals and synthetic inputs that pose threats to our health — especially children’s.

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FarmRoof®'s curator insight, June 28, 2013 2:51 PM

What a great infographic!

sTreet's comment, July 5, 2013 4:03 AM
fantastic
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Asbestos Kills American Workers [Infographic]

Asbestos Kills American Workers [Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

According to the American Thoracic Society, asbestos has been the largest cause of occupational cancer in the US.

 

Mesothelioma is a rare yet deadly form of cancer, the only known cause of which is exposure to asbestos. Because of that fact, the truth is that mesothelioma is entirely preventable, and our hope is that educating the public about mesothelioma and asbestos exposure will help bring an end to this fatal disease.

Did you know that asbestos is the largest cause of occupational cancer in the United States, and that we still import tons of this lethal material? What’s more, it doesn’t take much asbestos exposure to inhale or ingest enough asbestos and start the process towards developing mesothelioma, asbestosis, or another asbestos-related disease like lung cancer. In fact, some mesothelioma patients are the wives of men who worked with asbestos, who brought the tiny, deadly fibers home on their clothing, skin, and hair. Just this limited amount of asbestos exposure was enough to lead to a mesothelioma diagnosis decades later.

 

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The dangers of natural gas: Infographic

The dangers of natural gas: Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it
Although natural gas is considered comparably safer and better for the planet than other fossil fuels, there are drawbacks.
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Water Facts & Children: Infographic

Water Facts & Children: Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

Every 20 seconds, a child dies from a water-related disease. In the developing world, 24,000 children under the age of five die every day from preventable causes like diarrhea contracted from unclean water.

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Keystone XL would be right on top of latest Oklahoma earthquakes

Keystone XL would be right on top of latest Oklahoma earthquakes | green infographics | Scoop.it

Red: proposed route for Keystone XL

 

Orange star: epicenter of Saturday's magnitude 5.6 earthquake in Oklahoma, which buckled a highway and cracked a building.

 

The state is currently recovering from the quake and bracing for storms. A decade hence, if Keystone XL were running straight through the state, would they also be dealing with a major oil spill?

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The Human Cost of Energy

The Human Cost of Energy | green infographics | Scoop.it

Deadly accidents involving nuclear reactors, oil rigs and coal mines in recent months remind us that all forms of energy generation carry risks. For coal, mining tends to be the most dangerous step; for oil and gas, most accidents occur during distribution; and for nuclear, generating plants are on the hot seat.

The lion’s share of human costs, however, comes not from accidents but from pollution, which makes fossilfuels the most dangerous form of energy generation. 

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The Most Bike-Friendly States In The U.S.

The Most Bike-Friendly States In The U.S. | green infographics | Scoop.it

Washington, Minnesota, and Wisconsin are the best states for cycling in the United States. Alabama, Montana, and Kentucky are the worst. States like Florida and New York fall somewhere in the middle.

That's according to The League of American Bicyclists, which every year ranks states on their friendliness to cycling. Washington keeps its No. 1 status from last year, with Wisconsin moving up five places. Montana has dropped 10 places to 49th. Meanwhile, California and Ohio are the most improved from 2013. The latter state is up 16 places, from 32nd to 16th.

Find more deatils at the link or see the full report and methodology here.

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Smart Highways by Studio Roosegaarde

Smart Highways by Studio Roosegaarde | green infographics | Scoop.it

Glow-in-the-dark roads and responsive street lamps were among the concepts to make highways safer while saving money and energy at the Design Indaba conference in Cape Town earlier this month.


The Smart Highways project by Studio Roosegaarde proposes five energy-efficient concepts that will be tested on a stretch of highway in the Brabant province of the Netherlands from the middle of this year.

The first of the concepts is a glow-in-the-dark road that uses photo-luminescent paint to mark out traffic lanes. The paint absorbs energy from sunlight during the day the lights the road at night for up to 10 hours. Temperature-responsive road paint would show images of snowflakes when the temperature drops below zero, warning drivers to take care on icy roads.

There are two ideas for roadside lighting: interactive street lamps that come on as vehicles approach then dim as they pass by, thereby saving energy when there is no traffic, and "wind lights" that use energy generated by pinwheels as drafts of air from passing vehicles cause them to spin round. Additionally, an induction priority lane would incorporate induction coils under the tarmac to recharge electric cars as they drive...


Learn more about these innovative proposals and associated technology at the article link.

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Norm Miller's curator insight, March 25, 2013 1:15 PM

First we learned to sequence traffic lights.  Now we can capture energy for better road marking.  Next we will have computer guided car tracks that let us travel more efficiently as a group better utilizing existing highways.  Add in more fuel efficient or electric cars and we have a pretty good outlook for cleaner cities and less dependency on non-renewable resources.

Jim Gramata's comment, March 30, 2013 12:09 PM
If there is one area that needs focus and improvement it is highways. Agreed!
Anji Connell's curator insight, April 14, 2013 12:59 AM

Great idea No !

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Bikes Can Save Us! [infographic]

Bikes Can Save Us! [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Today’s infographic, How Bikes Can Save Us, suggests that by switching from gas guzzling cars to fat burning bikes we can do more than help the planet, we can help ourselves. Isn’t that nice? We can be selfish while still helping out the planet that is nice enough to house even though we just shit all over it. Anyway enjoy today’s infographic and keep sharing!

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The kingdom of fraud: Global economic crime [infographic]

The kingdom of fraud: Global economic crime [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Economic crime can mean anything from old-fashioned embezzlement to the growing incidence of cybercrime. What kinds of crimes are most common in the business world, and where do they happen most often?

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Space Waste [infographic]

Space Waste [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it
Usually, the term “space exploration” has been associated with groundbreaking new discoveries. But what happens to all the junk left in space from these glorious missions? It orbits around the globe at extreme speeds.
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Surprise Toxins In Your Home

Surprise Toxins In Your Home | green infographics | Scoop.it

Did you know the chemicals you are using to keep your home neat and tidy could actually be causing damage to your family’s health? This infographic done with Ecomom, looks at common household cleaning products and uncovers the toxins lurking inside.

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