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green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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Solar Power Is A Huge Water Saver (World Water Day Infographic)

Solar Power Is A Huge Water Saver (World Water Day Infographic) | green infographics | Scoop.it

Every year since 1993, the community of nations has focused on the importance of fresh water and advocated for the sustainable management of freshwater resources. Severe droughts experienced recently in places like the American West, the Horn of Africa, Russia, China, and Australia have highlighted the fact that humans are rapidly using up the world's water supplies—and when they’re gone, they’re gone. We are spending one of our most vital resources in greater volumes every day.

One Block Off The Grid recently developed an infographic to illustrate how energy production depends on water. It shows water use by four of the most common energy sources: coal, nuclear, oil and gas, and solar. Solar comes out on top big time.

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Russell Roberts's curator insight, May 2, 10:17 AM

Interesting infographic from Lauren Moss.  This graphic makes a strong case for solar power. It's about time Hawaii integrated more solar power into the grid.  With the adoption of "smart meters" and better grid management, we can lessen our dependence on imported oil for power generation.  Aloha, Russ.

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The Future Global Supply of Rare Earth Elements | Visual.ly

The Future Global Supply of Rare Earth Elements | Visual.ly | green infographics | Scoop.it

Up until the mid-1980s, the United States was the lead global producer of rare earth elements — materials that are used to make the technology that powers everything from laptops to hybrid cars — and have come to define our high-tech lives. Now, America is 100 percent dependent on imports of these elements and China is the primary world supplier. How does China's domination impact the future global supply of rare earth elements?

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The true cost of water

The true cost of water | green infographics | Scoop.it

The market’s perverse water pricing creates opportunities for businesses that look beyond the market and consider the true cost of H20.

The environmental and social costs of global business water use add up to around $1.9 trillion per year, according to new research.

Some of these external water costs already are being internalized and hitting bottom lines: Just last year, the worst drought in the United States in 50 years sent commodity prices skyrocketing. Companies, especially those in the food, beverage and apparel sectors whose margins and supply chains are tightly linked to agricultural commodities, can use the true cost of water to get ahead of the trend of external costs increasingly being internalized through regulations, pricing or shortages...

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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, May 18, 2013 7:06 PM

Understanding the true costs of resources, and accounting for these costs, is critical to realistically reaching the goal of Zero Footprint.

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Infographic: Together, We Can Save a Whole Lot More Water

Infographic: Together, We Can Save a Whole Lot More Water | green infographics | Scoop.it

World Water Day is one day a year when a lot of people start paying attention to water issues, and that's not a bad thing, but we really need sustained focus on this particular global resource.


It will be one of the biggest drivers in geopolitics in our lifetime, no doubt about it. China is redirecting mighty rivers to satisfy its need, and closer to home, the fight over the contents of the Colorado River isn't going away anytime soon.

Check out this simple infographic that illustrates just how much we could collectively conserve if we just cut back 5 percent in our use...

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Water: Global facts + statistics [infographic]

Water: Global facts + statistics [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Ever notice how we ask for “just water” at a restaurant? Like the source of all life is somehow inferior to soda or a glass of wine (both of which are mostly water)? A new infographic gives you just about every fact you need to know about water… including the ways we’re wasting it.

Take a look, and stop by the original article to share any other facts about water you wished more people knew. 

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World Supplies of Non-Renewable Resources, Visualized [Environmental Infographic]

World Supplies of Non-Renewable Resources, Visualized [Environmental Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Politicians and oil companies might waste time debating whether or not we’ve reached peak oil. What they ignore is that we run out completely in under 40 years’ time, by which time a third of the planet’s biodiversity will be lost.

In the meantime, tantalum, that great mainstay of mobile telecoms, will last only a few years more and run out just in time to celebrate the planet breaking the 2oC barrier in 2060.
There’s so much more words could say, but this, a very relevant and informative environmensl visualization, says is so much better...

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Hydro-Logic: Balancing Limited Water Supply with Increased Demand

Hydro-Logic: Balancing Limited Water Supply with Increased Demand | green infographics | Scoop.it

The hydrological water year starts every autumn on 1 October and extends to the following 30 September. The available description from the USGS does not explain why this is the period considered, but there is some natural logic to the hydrological year: with the end of summer comes the (approximate) end of intense evaporation from reservoirs and the beginning of the seasons in which the net water balance in a watershed is generally positive. That is, in general, precipitation > evaporation.

Normally, from the beginning through about two-thirds of the water year, water is stored in the higher reaches of large watersheds as snowpack, which melts and runs off through the rest of the water year. Stream flows generally continue to drop from October through winter, but then rise significantly at the start of the melt season. That imbalance applies over a period longer than a single storm and for the whole watershed, not just on a random wet or dry day in one's own neighborhood.


One of the more interesting areas to observe the water year is the Colorado River Basin (CRB) in the southwestern US. The Colorado River has become so strictly regulated, in part because of gross over-allocation, over nearly a century of intensive use that it has become what I think is a consummate example of the coupled natural - human system...


Visit the link for a closer look at this detailed map of the CRB natural and engineered systems designed for National Geographic. Also, obtain more information regarding statistics on CRB flows and the status of reservoirs and other river operations, including links to various organizations and resources for further study...

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Solar expected to make up 40 percent of PG&E's renewable portfolio by 2020

Solar expected to make up 40 percent of PG&E's renewable portfolio by 2020 | green infographics | Scoop.it
Solar power, which makes up a tiny part of Californias overall energy mix, will account for the biggest piece of the states renewable energy pie by the end of the decade, according to the states largest utilities.

Last year, Pacific Gas & Electric got most of its renewable energy from wind, bioenergy, geothermal and small hydropower dams. Solar accounted for about 1 percent. But that mix is quickly changing, and by 2020, the San Francisco-based utility expects solar to account for 40 percent of its renewable portfolio.
California's aggressive "Renewable Portfolio Standard" law requires utilities to purchase 33 percent of their electricity from renewable sources by 2020. Bioenergy, geothermal, solar, wind, wave and tidal power and small hydroelectric dams -- which cause less harm to the environment than large hydro dams -- all count toward meeting the law...
But solar is the fastest-growing piece of renewable portfolios, driven by federal stimulus funding for large solar power plants, a drop in solar panel prices and a boom in the number of developers competing for long-term utility contracts in California...

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Water and Development

Water and Development | green infographics | Scoop.it

When access to clean drinking water is an issue, it creates a web of developmental problems for a community.  For a video with more information about water/development statistics, but the organization http://charitywater.org see: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCHhwxvQqxg&feature=player_embedded


Via Seth Dixon
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David 's comment, May 21, 2012 11:58 PM
thank you for your awesome information
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TakePart Infographic: Not A Drop to Drink

TakePart Infographic: Not A Drop to Drink | green infographics | Scoop.it

You’ve heard there’s a water crisis. But, what does that mean? When water flows in seemingly limitless quantities out of the tap and gets trucked to cities in bottles by the ton, it doesn’t seem like water is something we’re in danger of losing.

 

Water quantity and quality should be a top issue for Americans. In this infographic created with TakePart are the four major components of the issue, and how they’re all connected.

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Interactive graphic shows just how few resources are left

Interactive graphic shows just how few resources are left | green infographics | Scoop.it

Scientific American has put together an interactive feature where you can watch resources disappear before your very eyes. The dates for when things will "run out" are a little fuzzy -- they've got animals pretty much running out five minutes from now, even though they're endangered but not extinct. But there are informative videos, and it's interesting to see how resources will dwindle over time.

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Funnel Incorporated + Green Infographics

Funnel Incorporated + Green Infographics | green infographics | Scoop.it
Funnel Incorporated creates information design that makes the complex clear.

One well-executed infographic or icon can be used for fundraising, presentations, media outreach, online, annual reports, events and more making this investment cost effective as well.

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How Much Water is your Home Wasting?

How Much Water is your Home Wasting? | green infographics | Scoop.it

From cooking to cleaning and manufacturing to shipping, humans consume excessive amounts of the earth’s most precious resource. Since only 1% of the earth’s water is available for human consumption, we need to reduce the amount of water we use.

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How Can You Reduce Your Water Footprint?

How Can You Reduce Your Water Footprint? | green infographics | Scoop.it

How much water do you use every day?  The answer might surprise you

A paper released online last week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concluded that Americans significantly underestimate their water use.

Curious how my friends and family would fare, I reached out via social media and posed the simple question, “how much water do you use each day?”  The results in my quick survey ranged to from 2 gallons to 300 gallons, but the most common estimate was 10 to 15 gallons per day.  In reality, Americans use closer to 90 gallons of water a day.  To put things in perspective, a 10-minute shower with an EPA WaterSense labeled high efficiency showerhead consumes 22 gallons, while a 20 minute shower with an older, high flow showerhead could be as much as 100 gallons.  Last month, Governor Brown declared a state of emergency and called on all Californians to conserve water in every way possible. 

Knowing how much water you use, and how and where you use it, are important first steps in determining the most effective ways you can save water in your home and business.

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 12, 7:43 PM

Water, water, everywhere but not a drop to waste.

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The Depth of Oil Wells

The Depth of Oil Wells | green infographics | Scoop.it
Just how far down do oil wells actually go? We will show you...
Lauren Moss's insight:

Visit the article for resources and useful links related to the oil industry and the environment...

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What If All Offices Went Green? [Infographic]

What If All Offices Went Green? [Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

This infographic from Metrofax highlights the benefits of going green in the workplace:  Waste-conscious companies can increase revenue, reduce disposal costs, and save resources.

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Arq. Rubén Plana's comment, May 10, 2013 8:42 AM
hooo!!good!!!
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Deconstructing Construction Waste & Saving Big with Modular [infographic]

Deconstructing Construction Waste & Saving Big with Modular [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Construction accounts for 24 percent of all solid waste produced in the U.S. That’s approximately 160 million tons of construction and demolition debris created every year.


Reducing construction waste can have a tremendous impact on landfill costs, not to mention the obvious benefit to our environment. One solution for greener building is modular construction. Modular is inherently more resource efficient, and can dramatically reduce C&D waste.

This infographic shares some staggering construction waste figures and the waste and money savings that can result from modular building...

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Mercor's curator insight, January 31, 2013 9:03 AM

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Global Climate at Risk as Nearly 1,200 New Coal Plants Proposed [interactive infographic]

Global Climate at Risk as Nearly 1,200 New Coal Plants Proposed [interactive infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

The World Resources Institute (WRI) released a report, Global Coal Risk Assessment, that analyzes information about proposed new coal-fired plants and other market trends in order to assess potential future risks to the global climate.

The report finds that there are 1,199 new coal power plants in the works, totaling more than 1.4 million megawatts of capacity worldwide. That’s four times the capacity of all the coal-fired power plants in the U.S. Seventy-six percent of the coal plants are proposed for India and China, with the U.S. seventh in the world for coal power plants in development.
According to the WRI, if all of these projects are built, it would add new coal power capacity that is almost four times the current capacity of all coal-fired plants in the U.S.


View the locations of proposed coal-fired power plants by country in this interactive map at the article link.

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Infographic: The Global Water Crisis

Infographic: The Global Water Crisis | green infographics | Scoop.it
Despite the critical role that water has in our everyday lives, few people realize that the world’s freshwater supply is facing a major crisis in the near future.

Take a look at this infographic for more details, statistics and data on the 'invisible threat to humanity's future' to help increase awareness with regard to the global water crisis...

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Sustainable Technology: Our phones are depleting natural resources [INFOGRAPHIC]

Sustainable Technology: Our phones are depleting natural resources [INFOGRAPHIC] | green infographics | Scoop.it
This infographic takes a look at this troubling technology trend, which is depleting the planet's supply of Rare Earth Elements.

Apple sold a record 5 million iPhones the first weekend the phone was on the market. And unlike in the iPhone’s early days, the latest Apple smartphones are not primarily being purchased by first time owners.

But did you ever stop to think about what happens to all those iPhone 3, 3GS, 4 and 4Ss now deemed out of date? While there are many recycling programs available, most smartphones are not efficiently thrown out.

Apple’s iPhones is far from the only culprit — most every smartphone, hard drive, hybrid car, satellite, MRI machine and GPS, along with dozens of other tech gadgets, are made from Rare Earth Elements.

This infographic takes a look at this troubling technology trend, which is depleting the planet’s supply of rare earth elements...

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Drill Baby! Is the US Turning Against Green Energy?

Drill Baby! Is the US Turning Against Green Energy? | green infographics | Scoop.it
Gas prices continue to rise. Everywhere around the world people are feeling that smoldering hole in their pocket continue to get hotter and hotter.

With other traditional sources of energy becoming depleted as well, opinions on where to find fuel have been shifting considerably.
Renewable energy has been losing some support. I mean, when you really think about it; who really wants to try and restore a natural balance to the Earth and stop stripping it of all its precious, natural resources? So lame (we’re being totally facetious by the way).
But, some people are thinking this way.
There has been a -18% change in support of developing alternative sources of energy like; wind, solar, and hydrogen. There has also been a 35% change in favor of expanding exploration and production of oil, coal, and natural gas. Even in the devastating wake of Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi plant last year, support for nuclear power is on the rise as well...

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Could there be 'Water Wars' in the Future?

Could there be 'Water Wars' in the Future? | green infographics | Scoop.it

The debate on aquifers continues as new technologies designed by oil companies are able to tap historic water reserves deep in the Earth's crust.  The geopolitical significance of water rises as population growth within dry climates continue to rise.   As more countries (and people) compete for limited resources, outbreaks of armed conflict becomes more likely.   The more pertinent question might not be 'if' but 'when.'


Via Kyle M Norton, Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's comment, October 5, 2012 11:55 PM
My colleagues at the National Council for Geographic Education LOVE this link...many people have seen your work and it's impacted teachers all over the country.
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Infographic: The metals that make our technology are running out

Infographic: The metals that make our technology are running out | green infographics | Scoop.it

This infographic by Camden Asay shows that we're fast running out of the stuff that powers our vehicles and our weaponry. But we've got even less time left with our gadgets. Yttrium and indium, two of the rare-earth elements that enable us to have TVs, computer monitors, and touch screens -- oh, and solar panels -- are on a fast track to complete depletion. At our current rate of use, we have less than 15 years' worth left. Of course, we'll probably become a little more efficient at deploying these resources ... but at our modern levels of demand for technology, efficiency really only postpones the inevitable...

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Welcome to Sourcemap.com

Welcome to Sourcemap.com | green infographics | Scoop.it

Welcome to sourcemap.com, a completely new version of our free platform for researching, sharing and optimizing supply chains. Here are some of our new features...

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The Web’s Best Green Infographics

The Web’s Best Green Infographics | green infographics | Scoop.it

Each week we write loads of articles filled with loads of numbers in an effort to get a handle on just how big of an impact we make on this planet. But sometimes, an illustration goes a lot further than hard numbers. We trolled the interwebs to find the best infographics on the most pressing environmental topics.

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