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creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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Infographic: The Secret to a Sound Ocean

Infographic: The Secret to a Sound Ocean | green infographics | Scoop.it

Whales are auditory creatures, meaning hearing is essential to their communication, navigation, feeding, and breeding. When container ships, oil tankers, and other large vessels travel through waters that are populated by whales, the ships produce noise that disrupts the whales’ activities and everyday life. This infographic looks at the secret to a sound ocean.

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Cutting Short-lived Pollutants Can Slow Sea Level Rise

Cutting Short-lived Pollutants Can Slow Sea Level Rise | green infographics | Scoop.it

A new study finds that it is possible to greatly slow the rate of sea level rise, which is one of the biggest threats global warming poses, by cutting “short-lived climate pollutants,” which warm the climate on timescales of a few weeks to a decade, in combination with reductions in long-lived greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2).


The study found that reducing emissions of these short-lived climate pollutants, including soot and methane, by 30 to 60% by 2050 would slow the annual rate of sea level rise by about 18% by 2050. Combining reductions in short-lived pollutants with decreasing CO2 emissions could cut the rate of sea level rise in half by 2100, from 0.82 inches to 0.43 inches per year, while reducing the total sea level rise by 31% during the same period.


Related research by Climate Central scientists shows that the emissions reductions would potentially benefit more than 2 million Americans by 2100, who might otherwise be living below sea level at that point...

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Arctic sea ice before and after record low – interactive map

Arctic sea ice before and after record low – interactive map | green infographics | Scoop.it

Arctic sea ice has reached its lowest ever recorded extent, in 'dramatic changes', which signal that man-made global warming is having a major impact on the polar region.

Drag the slider across the map to see how the ice has shrunk between 1979 and 2012 in the interactive map at the article link.

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Greenpeace: Save the Arctic Tour

Greenpeace: Save the Arctic Tour | green infographics | Scoop.it

We understand oil is a hot commodity (our entire modern world depends on it), but for the sake of saving money and not having to depend so heavily on foreign oil, the price just isn’t worth it. We all know the savings won’t be passed down to the consumer in the form of lower gas prices or heating options — at best they’ll stay where they are, if we’re even that lucky. Oil giants like Shell and Russia’s Gazprom threaten the entire ecosystem of the melting arctic. Polar bears, whales, and other creatures reside there — even native people. Russian oil companies are already damaging their Arctic areas, and we need to keep the unowned and uninhabited area around the North Pole a sanctuary, on both the Alaskan and Russian arctic fronts.

Two Greenpeace ships, the Esperanza and the Arctic Sunrise, are already on their way to the arctic right now to head off the Arctic oil rush. See what they’re up against in this graphic...

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The Secret to a Sound Ocean

The Secret to a Sound Ocean | green infographics | Scoop.it
Acoustics mean different things to different species.

As humans, we need sound to hear our favorite music, the roar of the crowd and sirens so we don’t get flattened by a firetruck or freight train. While hearing is an enjoyable part of living a fulfilled life, we can get by without it.

Whales on the other hand, have a harder time. Whales are auditory creatures, meaning hearing is essential to their communication, navigation, feeding, and breeding.

Whales depend on sound in every aspect of their lives: from using echolocation to orient themselves in the dark waters, to emitting mating calls during breeding season, or just having a whale chat.

When container ships, oil tankers, and other large vessels travel through waters that are populated by whales, the ships produce noise that throws the whales into a state of disarray and messes with their activities and daily life. The sound is so strong, it would be as if you were at a party and someone blasted music so loud you couldn’t even hear each other speak — let alone try and mate. Sound is important to the whales, and creating a beautiful sounding ocean will help them in all their future endeavors...

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Keep the Coast Clear: How to visualize ocean trash

Keep the Coast Clear: How to visualize ocean trash | green infographics | Scoop.it

Verrier's eye-catching rendering depicts objects bobbing in an ocean. The graphic correlates depth to the number collected since the first Coastal Cleanup day in 1986. Cigarettes butts (52,907,756 collected), stick out of the water, and plastic food wrappers (more than 14 million), float just below the surface. Appliances (117,356 of which have been hauled away) float near the bottom, in light deprived, gray depths. In an instant, it's easy to see how difficult it is for marine life to survive in that much detritus. And that, precisely, is the genius of Verrier's visualization...

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The Truth About Plastic

The Truth About Plastic | green infographics | Scoop.it

The truth about plastic and its impact on our planet- learn how to shrink your 'plastic footprint'.

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International Coastal Cleanup: 25 years of Debris Collected

International Coastal Cleanup: 25 years of Debris Collected | green infographics | Scoop.it

The debris picked up on just one day each for 25 years  by cleanup volunteers paints a clear picture... we need to rethink the way we live our lives to stop the flow of trash at the source, and reduce, reuse, and recycle.

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The Life of a Water Bottle | Visual.ly

The Life of a Water Bottle | Visual.ly | green infographics | Scoop.it

Americans buy nearly a billion water bottles each week, which equals an average of three bottles for every person in the U.S. daily. Whatever way you look at it, we are chugging a lot of bottled aqua and pouring our money down the drain. So what happens once you take the last chug? This infographic looks at the life-cycle of a plastic water bottle, from the first sip to the landfill.

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Putting All the World’s Water into a Big Cube

Putting All the World’s Water into a Big Cube | green infographics | Scoop.it

All the water underground, on the surface, and in the atmosphere amounts to about 332 million cubic miles. That makes a cube with a side of 693 miles, whose base stretches from Indianapolis to Denver. You couldn't even fill the Pacific with the water in that cube, let alone everything else.  

So, the big takeaway here is that the Earth’s oceans are nothing more than a thin film on the surface of the Earth, relatively speaking.


And how big would a cube of just the fresh water be?  It would have sides 202 miles long and sit nicely on top of Iowa.

And the drinkable water cube? Its sides would be 29 miles long and it would fit into Rhode Island.

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The Seas of Plastic | Visual.ly

The Seas of Plastic | Visual.ly | green infographics | Scoop.it

'We created an interactive data visualisation about plastic pollution in the world’s oceans based on a study that our scientist and oceanographer Laurent Lebreton published in 2012. It is based on the results of a numerical model of floating marine debris and serves to identify the 5 plastic gyres as well as other accumulation zones. Furthermore it provides an insight to relative contributors by regions and allows for comparison by region and accumulation zone.'

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Scorecard for the Sea: The Ocean Health Index

Scorecard for the Sea: The Ocean Health Index | green infographics | Scoop.it
To feed, employ, and sustain the world, our oceans must first be in good health. It is becoming increasingly clear that humans have a substantial impact on these marine ecosystems, and that these impacts are not just threatening the high-seas, but also the humans that depend on them for their livelihoods and well-being.

The health of our oceans is, therefore, primarily a human concern. But how do we measure the health of something as vast and bewildering as an entire ocean?

For many years, scientists have struggled to find a way to make the concept of ocean health meaningful and measureable. There have been a few breakthroughs but no real solution to allow us to concretely measure if things are getting better or worse and by how much? That is, until now.

Published in last week’s issue of the journal Nature The Ocean Health Index is a groundbreaking tool that allows us to take a look at how we as humans benefit from the big blue. The Index examines social, economic, and ecological factors, scaling both globally and locally to give us an accurate assessment. It finally gives us the baseline we need to measure progress...

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Ocean Health Study Raises Concerns, Offers Some Hope

Ocean Health Study Raises Concerns, Offers Some Hope | green infographics | Scoop.it

A comprehensive study of global oceanic health gave the world’s oceans a score of 60 out of 100.

The Ocean Health Index, produced by an international team of scientists, policymakers, and conservationists, assessed the vitality of 171 coastal countries and territorial regions in ten categories, including ecological characteristics such as “Coastal Protection,” “Biodiversity,” and sustainable seafood harvests, and economic qualities like “Coastal Livelihoods and Economies” and “Tourism and Recreation.”

The study is “the first comprehensive global measurement of ocean health that includes people as part of the ocean ecosystem,” and is designed to help strengthen national and regional efforts to preserve our coastal environments and evaluate marine health...

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Cool Infographics - Blog - Lakes & Oceans: A Deep Infographic

Cool Infographics - Blog - Lakes & Oceans: A Deep Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

Another great infographic from Randall Munroe’s xkcd online comic. Lakes & Oceans visualizes the various depths of the worlds water, and even includes…a mysterious door that James Cameron built his deep-sea submersible to reach at the bottom of the Marianas Trench and open?

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An Illustrated Guide to the Science of Global Warming Impacts: How We Know Inaction Is the Gravest Threat Humanity Faces

An Illustrated Guide to the Science of Global Warming Impacts: How We Know Inaction Is the Gravest Threat Humanity Faces | green infographics | Scoop.it
Humanity’s Choice (via M.I.T.):  Inaction (“No Policy”) eliminates most of the uncertainty about whether or not future warming will be catastrophic.  Aggressive emissions reductions dramatically improves humanity’s chances.

Via Anne Caspari
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Recycling: the Good, the Better, the Best

Recycling: the Good, the Better, the Best | green infographics | Scoop.it

Do you recycle?

If you compost your old foods, then take all your recycled items like paper, glass, some plastics, aluminum out of the picture, what you have in the end is actually very little trash at all.

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When Sea Levels Attack

When Sea Levels Attack | green infographics | Scoop.it

Changes in global sea level due to rising temperatures...

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An Antarctica Floe Chart Worthy Of Your Icy Stares | Fast Company

An Antarctica Floe Chart Worthy Of Your Icy Stares | Fast Company | green infographics | Scoop.it

Using new satellite data, scientists have plotted exactly how the ice moves around the South Pole, shining new light on exactly how much water is going to flood into the ocean as the ice melts.

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