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green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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The Health Profile Of Every County In America, Mapped

The Health Profile Of Every County In America, Mapped | green infographics | Scoop.it
This snapshot shines a light on how where we live matters when it comes to our well-being.

When we talk about the health of America, we often talk in broad strokes. We focus on big trends—say, in obesity or diabetes—not what's happening at a more local level.

That's unfortunate for two reasons. One, we might miss some of the variety of health out there—for example, that one county in a state is appreciably less healthy than another. And, two, we might overlook local factors that affect our health as much as federal or state policy, or even our own personal responsibility.

The idea of the County Health Rankings is to shine a light on the local, and show how where we live matters.

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The Geography of Well-Being

The Geography of Well-Being | green infographics | Scoop.it

Economic growth has long been the basic metric through which we evaluate economic and social progress. But a growing number of policymakers and experts argue that we need a better way to measure “well being.”

In a recent report, the Social Science Research Council’s Measure of America project takes a crack at it with their own metric. Inspired by the UN’s influential Human Development Index for nations, their American Human Development Index develops measures of well-being for America’s 435 congressional districts (plus Washington, D.C.). This allows us to see how patterns of uneven and unequal socio-economic well-being exist not just between but within many of America’s largest metros...

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    The overall index is based on three key dimensions of well-being:

    A long and healthy life, as measured by life expectancy at birth.Access to knowledge, based on school enrollment for people ages 3 to 24 (weighted one third) and educational degree attainment for those 25 and older (weighted two-thirds).Standard of living, based on median earnings for full- and part-time workers 16 and older.
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    Flowing Maps Explore the City's Impact on the Local Environment

    Flowing Maps Explore the City's Impact on the Local Environment | green infographics | Scoop.it

    Digital artist and illustrator Istvan has created a series of maps which artfully imagine the affect of cities and their human inhabitants on the local environment. His colorful images aren’t scientific in nature, but rather a personal exploration of what it might look like if the energies of the metropolis flowed out of the city itself.

    “I wanted to represent the influence of cities on their environment as a kind of invisible fluid that overflows from the city to its surrounding.”

    The flow of each city map was digitally rendered using local terrain to simulate the erosion flow Istvan desired, then reworked in Photoshop to create a unique identity for each place. The final images were printed on 70cm square acrylic glass.


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    This Is What Informal Transit Looks Like When You Actually Map It

    This Is What Informal Transit Looks Like When You Actually Map It | green infographics | Scoop.it
    An experiment from Nairobi with implications for the urbanizing world.

    As transit systems go, the "matatus" in Nairobi exist somewhere between underground gypsy cabs and MTA bus service. The minibuses themselves aren't owned by any government agency. The fares aren't regulated by the city. The routes are vaguely based on a bus network that existed in Nairobi some 30 years ago, but they've since shifted and multiplied and expanded.

    Not surprisingly, many passengers on board know little about them, either. Riders who navigate the matatu system rely on it in parts, using only the lines they know and the unofficial stops they're sure actually exist. As for the network as a whole – there's never even been a map of it...

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    All the Hurricanes of the Past 170 Years, Mapped

    All the Hurricanes of the Past 170 Years, Mapped | green infographics | Scoop.it
    See where 11,967 cyclones overlap in space in this fascinating look at the planet's most powerful storms.

    The gusty cartography plots the paths all the tropical cyclones recorded in the past 170 years. Brighter areas show where they have overlapped in space, representing areas of historically frequent hurricane activity.

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    Soc Sci8's curator insight, September 19, 2013 7:56 AM

    add your insight...

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    Visualizing a Walkable City

    Visualizing a Walkable City | green infographics | Scoop.it

    The city of Pontevedra in northwest Spain has become a leader in walker-friendly urban policy over the past 15 years. As the capital of its province, county and municipality, Pontevedra attracted enough automobile commuters each day to overwhelm its antiquated streets.

    In response, instead of razing old buildings and constructing bigger roads, the city council widened sidewalks, established a free bike-lending service, installed speed bumps and set a speed limits of 30 kilometers per hour. They even banned motorized transport in sections of Pontevedra. Walking zones now extend from the historic center to streets and squares in newer neighborhoods. Although the driving ban initially faced resistance, it is now broadly supported and has become an essential part of the city's identity as an attractive place to live...


    To further improve walkability, Pontevedra's city council produced a map that visualizes the distances and travel times between key places on foot. Known as Metrominuto, the map has color-coded lines that resemble those of a subway guide. Free parking areas are marked to encourage visitors to leave their cars outside the city center. Metrominuto reminds residents and visitors that many automobile trips can be made in a more convenient, environmentally friendly and healthy way by walking.

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    ryanleonard's comment, April 20, 2013 7:25 AM
    nice
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    Environmental Data Mapped: Ecosystem Stress in the Great Lakes

    Environmental Data Mapped:  Ecosystem Stress in the Great Lakes | green infographics | Scoop.it

    A first-of-its-kind map that pulls together numerical data on nearly three dozen factors that affect the Great Lakes ecosystem shows that the lakes with the most urban and agricultural development in their watersheds are also those with the greatest environmental stress.


    Lakes Erie and Ontario, the easternmost lakes, are challenged by high coastal population densities, an industrial legacy and phosphorous pollution from agricultural runoff. They are also downstream from wind currents that drop nitrogen generated by industries and power plants into their waters.

    But the map’s patches of high-stress red and yellow should not be misinterpreted. The color scale is a relative measure that compares the combined stress of the 34 environmental indicators in a particular area to the stress level of the lake system as a whole.


    To create the maps, the research team queried some 160 experts from universities, nonprofits and government agencies in the United States and Canada and compiled a list of 50 key biological, chemical or physical indicators, of which two-thirds had data sufficient enough to be plotted.

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    Energy Infrastructure Threat from Sea Level Rise: an interactive infographic

    Energy Infrastructure Threat from Sea Level Rise: an interactive infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

    Sea level rise from global warming is well on the way to doubling the risk of coastal floods 4 feet or more over high tide by 2030 at locations nationwide.


    In the lower 48 states, nearly 300 energy facilities stand on land below that level, including natural gas infrastructure, electric power plants and oil and gas refineries. Many more facilities are at risk at higher levels, where flooding will become progressively more likely with time as the sea continues to rise. These results come from a Climate Central combined analysis of datasets from NOAA, USGS and FEMA, published in a Surging Seas Brief and included in testimony before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee on April 19, 2012.


    For a fuller picture of risk from sea level rise and storm surge, including statistics for 3,000 towns, cities, counties and states, plus threat timelines, see the Surging Seas interactive map.

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    Hydro-Logic: Balancing Limited Water Supply with Increased Demand

    Hydro-Logic: Balancing Limited Water Supply with Increased Demand | green infographics | Scoop.it

    The hydrological water year starts every autumn on 1 October and extends to the following 30 September. The available description from the USGS does not explain why this is the period considered, but there is some natural logic to the hydrological year: with the end of summer comes the (approximate) end of intense evaporation from reservoirs and the beginning of the seasons in which the net water balance in a watershed is generally positive. That is, in general, precipitation > evaporation.

    Normally, from the beginning through about two-thirds of the water year, water is stored in the higher reaches of large watersheds as snowpack, which melts and runs off through the rest of the water year. Stream flows generally continue to drop from October through winter, but then rise significantly at the start of the melt season. That imbalance applies over a period longer than a single storm and for the whole watershed, not just on a random wet or dry day in one's own neighborhood.


    One of the more interesting areas to observe the water year is the Colorado River Basin (CRB) in the southwestern US. The Colorado River has become so strictly regulated, in part because of gross over-allocation, over nearly a century of intensive use that it has become what I think is a consummate example of the coupled natural - human system...


    Visit the link for a closer look at this detailed map of the CRB natural and engineered systems designed for National Geographic. Also, obtain more information regarding statistics on CRB flows and the status of reservoirs and other river operations, including links to various organizations and resources for further study...

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    Mapping bike commuters across the states...

    Mapping bike commuters across the states... | green infographics | Scoop.it
    Check out this map produced by the League of American Bicyclists and posted on the graphics site Visual.ly. The fonts are small - this image looks intended for a wall, not a computer - but look closely: the darker the state, the larger the share of total trips taken by bicycle, as opposed to driving, walking, or transit; the larger the maroon and yellow box, the larger the number of people commuting to work by bicycle. You can see that California, followed by Florida and New York, have the largest number of bike commuters. But, when you go by mode share - the portion of total trips taken by bike - the leading states appear to be Colorado, Oregon, and (improbably?) Montana. It is hard to tell for sure, but I believe the data came from multiple sources, including the US Census’s American Community Survey.

    The map also indicates (in tiny print) the country’s ten cities with the highest mode share for bicycling. Unsurprisingly, Portland ranks first; but I might not have guessed that Minneapolis is second, especially given that city’s notorious winter weather. A larger version of the map contains additional graphics (two excerpted below, with small but readable fonts) that show the total numbers for the top ten cities, as well as some other interesting data, including overall spending on cycling infrastructure.

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    Citizen Science – an interactive map of wind visualization and temperature

    Citizen Science – an interactive map of wind visualization and temperature | green infographics | Scoop.it

    Nicolas Garcia Belmonte has visualized wind motion in the USA- the visualization shows wind direction encoded in line angles, wind speed encoded in line lengths and disk radius, and temperature encoded in hue. All this for about 1200 weather stations across the country.

    You can switch between different visual markers from the top menu, also play the wind motion for the 72 hours or select a specific time from the timeline below the graphic...

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    EPA maps the worst greenhouse gas offenders

    EPA maps the worst greenhouse gas offenders | green infographics | Scoop.it
    The EPA has organized its data on major greenhouse gas emitters into a handy interactive map. You can zoom in on your area to see where the emissions come from near you, or scan around for the worst offenders.

    This map covers facilities that emit 25,000 metric tons or more of GHGs every year, so it's not like this map shows the sources of all of the country's emissions. There's no transportation, or residential, or agricultural facilities represented. But you're looking at more than half of the United States' GHGs, including all the major polluters.

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    The EV-Charging Community

    The EV-Charging Community | green infographics | Scoop.it

    Our vision is a world where transportation is clean and green with zero carbon emissions. Our vision is efficient, environmentally-friendly transport that gets you where you want to be, when you want to be there.


    Via Marc Rougier
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    172 drought maps reveal just how thirsty California has become

    172 drought maps reveal just how thirsty California has become | green infographics | Scoop.it

    Just how dry is California? Here is every map of the state released by the U.S. Drought Monitor since 2011.

    The majority of California is experiencing extreme to exceptional drought, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor, and the state's condition isn't expected to improve in the near future.

    The Drought Monitor, which collects data from 50 different weather indicators, have shown an increasingly red California since 2011, the last time the drought map was clear.

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    Flowing Maps Explore the City's Impact on the Local Environment

    Flowing Maps Explore the City's Impact on the Local Environment | green infographics | Scoop.it

    Digital artist and illustrator Istvan has created a series of maps which artfully imagine the affect of cities and their human inhabitants on the local environment. His colorful images aren’t scientific in nature, but rather a personal exploration of what it might look like if the energies of the metropolis flowed out of the city itself.

    “I wanted to represent the influence of cities on their environment as a kind of invisible fluid that overflows from the city to its surrounding.”

    The flow of each city map was digitally rendered using local terrain to simulate the erosion flow Istvan desired, then reworked in Photoshop to create a unique identity for each place. The final images were printed on 70cm square acrylic glass.


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    Nine maps that show how climate change is already affecting the US

    Nine maps that show how climate change is already affecting the US | green infographics | Scoop.it

    Climate change isn't just a problem for future generations — it's already affecting broad swaths of the United States.

    That's the upshot of the National Climate Assessment, a massive new US government report detailing the current and future impacts of global warming around the country. The report is particularly useful in detailing how specific regions and sectors will be affected — and outlining some possible ways we could adapt.

    There's a lot of information in the report, but find nine highlights at the link.

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    Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, May 8, 2014 4:45 AM

    Convincing maps. Great information.

    Russell Roberts's curator insight, May 20, 2014 12:07 AM

    Check out this infographic from the National Climate Assessment.  The effects of "climate change" are already being felt.  On the U.S. mainland, the summers are getting hotter and the winters getting colder.  According to data from the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory, the amount of Carbon Dioxide and other "greenhouse" gases is  in the atmosphere is increasing.  Although the climate chage is slight at present the trend will intensify in the next 200 to 1,000 years.  About all we can do is adapt to the coming changes and mititgate the more serious effects as best we can.  Aloha, Russ.

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    All the Rivers in the U.S. on a Single Interactive Map

    All the Rivers in the U.S. on a Single Interactive Map | green infographics | Scoop.it

    A recent report by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency concluded that 55 percent of U.S. rivers and streams are in poor condition. Many of us might not realize just how many rivers and streams there are in the United States.

    This map gives you an idea of how many there are; visit the link to see many beautiful different visualizations of rivers in the U.S., as well as an interactive map that you can play with and zoom in and out of to see the rivers in your area.

    All river data comes from the NHDPlus dataset, a geo-spatial, hydrologic framework dataset envisioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

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    The States And Cities That Lead (And Lag) In The Clean-Tech Economy

    The States And Cities That Lead (And Lag) In The Clean-Tech Economy | green infographics | Scoop.it

    When it comes to clean tech, America could do with some Californication. The state is beating everywhere else hands down, from public policy and capital invested to adoption of electric vehicles and smart meters.


    A new ranking of clean-tech leadership from research firm Clean Edge gives the Golden State a score of 91.7 out of 100. The next highest ranked state, Massachusetts, comes in with a score of 77.8. Clean Edge’s state scores combine 70 indicators, while the metro scores look at 20 factors, including things like green buildings and levels of clean electricity.


    Via SustainOurEarth, Stephane Bilodeau
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    Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, June 11, 2013 7:57 AM

    "A new ranking of clean-tech leadership from research firm Clean Edge gives the Golden State a score of 91.7 out of 100. The next highest ranked state, Massachusetts, comes in with a score of 77.8. Clean Edge’s state scores combine 70 indicators, while the metro scores look at 20 factors, including things like green buildings and levels of clean electricity."

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    Climate Change: Recent Trends & Reports

    Climate Change: Recent Trends & Reports | green infographics | Scoop.it

    U.S. Winters Warming Faster, says a new report by Climate Central, an online scientific journalism organization. Before you snow shovelers start cheering, just remember that this is a marker of human-driven climate change - you know, the process that brings more extreme weather, like mega storms,blizzards, and the ongoing US drought currently threatening our wheat crops...

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    Are Earthquakes and Fracking Wastewater Injection Wells Related?

    Are Earthquakes and Fracking Wastewater Injection Wells Related? | green infographics | Scoop.it

    Two new papers tie a recent increase in significant earthquakes to reinjection of wastewater fluids from unconventional oil and gas drilling. The first study notes “significant earthquakes are increasingly occurring within the United States midcontinent.” In the specific case of Oklahoma, a Magnitude “5.7 earthquake and a prolific sequence of related events … were likely triggered by fluid injection.”
    The second study, of the Raton Basin of Southern Colorado/Northern New Mexico by a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) team, concludes “the majority, if not all of the earthquakes since August 2001 have been triggered by the deep injection of wastewater related to the production of natural gas from the coal-bed methane field here.”

    Both studies are being presented at the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union this week.
    These studies, together with other recent findings, make a strong case that we need national regulations on wastewater injection to prevent induced earthquakes...

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    Andrew S.'s comment, October 20, 2014 9:45 AM
    Cool!
    Carolyn's curator insight, October 20, 2014 9:59 AM

    MORE EARTHQUAKES!

    AlaineS's curator insight, October 22, 2014 5:17 PM

    Very informative and has specific facts on the topic.

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    The Hestia Project Maps Carbon Emissions of US Cities Down to Street Level

    The Hestia Project Maps Carbon Emissions of US Cities Down to Street Level | green infographics | Scoop.it
    A team of researchers from Arizona State University have developed a new software system, called Hestia, that is capable of estimating greenhouse gas emissions across entire urban landscapes, all the way down to street level and individual buildings.

    The project, known as Hestia after the Greek goddess of home and hearth, allows the team to combine extensive public database “data-mining” with traffic simulation and building-by-building energy-consumption modeling.

    According to researchers, Hestia’s increased detail and accuracy will help cities, and possibly even other nations, identify where an investment in energy and greenhouse gas savings would have the greatest impact...

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    Map of the Day: Where Americans Use the Most Oil

    Map of the Day: Where Americans Use the Most Oil | green infographics | Scoop.it
    3.5 percent of U.S. counties consume more than 10 percent of the nation's oil.

    America consumes a lot of energy. Counties play a large role in this overall consumption — and many of them contain large cities like Los Angeles and Chicago.

    Deron Lovaas, the federal transportation policy director for the Natural Resources Defense Council, posted a map charting oil consumption by county on the NRDC staff blog Thursday.

    The map is the product of a joint research effort of the NRDC, the Sierra Club, and the League of Conservation Voters to identify the most oil dependent locations across the United States.


    As shown in the map (and accompanying list of national averages), oil consumption is geographically uneven and highly concentrated. Lovaas notes that "just 108 counties out of the nation's 3,144, or about 3.5 percent of the total consume more than 10 percent of the nation's oil." Not surprisingly, Los Angeles county had the most annual oil consumption, at nearly 1.9 billion gallons in 2010. Harris county, Texas, follows with 1.7 billion gallons, and Cook county, Illinois, takes third with 1.6 billion.

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    Storm Surge Interactive Map Shows What Parts of NYC Could be Affected by Rising Sea Levels

    Storm Surge Interactive Map Shows What Parts of NYC Could be Affected by Rising Sea Levels | green infographics | Scoop.it
    Climate Central's new Storm Surge interactive map helps New Yorkers see if their neighborhoods could be flooded by rising sea levels.

    Although the city has committed to investing in a system to deter an abundance of stormwater overflow, flooding is still a major concern for New York City. The New Jersey non-profit, Climate Central, has created an interactive map that illustrates to New Yorkers just how global warming and flooding could affect the city by as early as 2020. Called Surging Seas, the map allows visitors to type in their zip codes and see projected flooding risks over time...

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    National Forest Map

    National Forest Map | green infographics | Scoop.it
    What areas of the United States contain the densest amount of woody biomass?

     

    This map and the localized versions show the biogeography of the distinct climatic zones of the United States.  It also can show interesting human patterns.  What are some things that explain this spatial distribution? 


    Via Seth Dixon
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    Our Global Footprint

    Our Global Footprint | green infographics | Scoop.it

    All of us depend on nature to live. In some ways, Earth’s bounty is like a bank account, which is recharged, for instance by sun-powered plant growth. Against this account, we—as individuals, as nations, and as a global community—are constantly making withdrawals.

    But as human numbers and activities increase, we spend more and more against nature’s account. Are we withdrawing at a rate that exceeds nature’s ability to recharge this account? Are we able to maintain a positive balance?

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