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green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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Mapping Los Angeles's Better But Still Terrible Air Quality

Mapping Los Angeles's Better But Still Terrible Air Quality | green infographics | Scoop.it

Though the persistent brown halo around Downtown might suggest otherwise, the amount of cancer-causing toxins in the Los Angeles basin air has fallen 65 percent since 2005, says a new report out from the South Coast Air Quality Management District. Don't breathe too deeply yet. Despite the improvement, "The levels still occurring here in Southern California are too high and need to be further reduced," an executive officer of the SCAQMD tells the Daily News.

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Heat Mapping the World's Hottest Temperatures

Heat Mapping the World's Hottest Temperatures | green infographics | Scoop.it
The Andrew Sykes Group, a large air conditioning firm based in the UK, has developed this interactive displaying record highs, and current temperatures from select cities across the globe. 

While Climate Central's interactive tool (displaying the average temperature cities across the U.S. are expected to reach by 2100) did little to make those of us suffering a sweltering summer feel optimistic about the future, the interactive graphic at the link provides some perspective that current temperatures could be worse.

The Andrew Sykes Group has developed this interactive displaying record highs, and current temperatures from select cities across the globe. Smaller nodes represent cities, while larger nodes stand for the hottest temperatures ever seen on each continent.

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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, August 9, 2014 8:08 PM

The Andrew Sykes Group has developed this interactive displaying record highs, and current temperatures from select cities across the globe. Smaller nodes represent cities, while larger nodes stand for the hottest temperatures ever seen on each continent.

Russell Roberts's curator insight, September 14, 2014 4:10 AM

Fascinating interactive tool that displays the rising temperature trends around the world.  Science fact or just natural cycles, the planet is getting warmer.  This graphic is a sobering reminder of how lucky were are right now.  The future is going to be hot, drier, and more uncomfortable than it is now.  Aloha, Russ.

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Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted

Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted | green infographics | Scoop.it
Explore the world’s new coastlines if sea level rises 216 feet.

Via Seth Dixon
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Brian Hammerstix's curator insight, November 23, 2013 7:29 PM

#stopburningfossilfuels or #goodbyeflorida

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:15 PM

Aside from the mass devastation i think it would be pretty cool of all the ice melted. As the interactive map shows there would be in inland sea in australia which i can turn into the AUs great lakes. Also imagine the possiblility of being able to take a vacation to antartica and not having to dress for absurdly negative tempatures, all the undiscovered land and preservated fossils. It would be a interestling link to the past that only in the future we could experience.

Mrs. Karnowski-Simul's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:20 AM

Would Belgium be covered in water if all the ice melted?

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All the Hurricanes of the Past 170 Years, Mapped

All the Hurricanes of the Past 170 Years, Mapped | green infographics | Scoop.it
See where 11,967 cyclones overlap in space in this fascinating look at the planet's most powerful storms.

The gusty cartography plots the paths all the tropical cyclones recorded in the past 170 years. Brighter areas show where they have overlapped in space, representing areas of historically frequent hurricane activity.

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Soc Sci8's curator insight, September 19, 2013 7:56 AM

add your insight...

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Infographic: Watch a City's Pulse in Real-Time

Infographic: Watch a City's Pulse in Real-Time | green infographics | Scoop.it
A new way of collecting data allows a duo of creative coders to archive transit information and update the map every hour, creating a handy tool for trend spotting and comparing traffic.


The first time Andy Woodruff and Tim Wallace created a map of Boston’s bus routes was back in the fall of 2011. Using data from the MBTA, the duo (who write over at Boston-centric blog, Bostonography, charted the paths and speeds of buses over the course of 24 hours.

In the years since they first published the MBTA Bus Speeds, the team has learned better ways to automate mapping. Now, with a bit of coding they can sit back and watch the maps draw themselves. Woodruff and Wallace pull in data from NextBus every hour, and that information is stored in a database. “Image rendering is done by some pretty simple PHP scripts that grab the data, string the points together into lines based on vehicle ID, calculate distances and speeds, then draw thousands of lines.”

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New York City Energy Mapping Project

New York City Energy Mapping Project | green infographics | Scoop.it

The Modi Research Group at Columbia created the New York City Energy Mapping Project back in February. The interactive map represents the total annual building energy consumption at the block level and at the taxlot level for New York City, and is expressed in kilowatt hours (kWh) per square meter of land area. The data comes from a mathematical model based on statistics, not private information from utilities, to estimate the annual energy consumption values of buildings throughout the five boroughs. To see the break down of the type of energy being used, for which purpose and in what quantity, hover over or click on a block or taxlot.

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Interactive Map: Fracking Across the United States

Interactive Map: Fracking Across the United States | green infographics | Scoop.it

The country is in the midst of an unprecedented gas drilling boom—brought on by a controversial technology called hydraulic fracturing or “fracking.” Along with this fracking-fueled gas rush have come troubling reports of poisoned drinking water, polluted air, mysterious animal deaths, industrial disasters and explosions. We call them “Fraccidents.”
This map displays a sampling of some of the high profile incidents related to the country’s gas drilling boom. Each of the symbols below represents a fraccident. Click on any of the highlighted states below to learn more about some of the fraccidents in that state, details on the fracking issues facing the state, and resources for getting involved in your local fight against fracking...

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Carbon map infographic: a new way to see the Earth move

Carbon map infographic: a new way to see the Earth move | green infographics | Scoop.it

How can you map the world to show global data in an immediately clear way? How can you show two datasets at once to see how they compare?

Kiln, a partnership of Guardian writer Duncan Clark and developer Robin Houston has come up with this beautiful new take on the globe. Watch the animated intro or click on the topics and see the map move before your eyes. Adding shading lets you compare two datasets to see how they relate – so you can see clearly how poorest countries have the fastest growing populations but the lowest emissions...

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New York City Energy Use All Over the Map

New York City Energy Use All Over the Map | green infographics | Scoop.it
New York City’s appetite for energy is immense, making it a revealing case study for how people use — and waste — energy.

“Midtown Manhattan has more energy use than the whole country of Kenya, and New York state uses more energy than all of sub-Saharan Africa,” said Vijay Modi, a professor of mechanical engineering at Columbia University. “There is just this intense use of energy in cities like New York.”

A new project by Modi and graduate student Bianca Howard aims to put the city’s energy consumption on the map. The results of their work are displayed on an interactive map estimating the total annual energy consumption for nearly every building across the five boroughs.

Their research allows New Yorkers to get a rough idea of how much energy is used inside their homes, offices and businesses — and it offers a peek into the building next door, down the street and across the city. The goal of the project is to take some of the mystery out of energy usage..

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Mapping the LA Neighborhoods Most at Risk From Global Warming

Mapping the LA Neighborhoods Most at Risk From Global Warming | green infographics | Scoop.it

The UCLA Luskin Center and Environmental Defense Fund have just released a new report looking at Los Angeles's opportunities for using more solar power (which are still 98% untapped, they say) and it includes these fascinating maps of which areas of LA County are most vulnerable to global warming.

According to the report, it's the "first study to provide specific climate-change projections for the greater Los Angeles area [in the years 2041 to 2060], with unique projections down to the neighborhood level." By mid-century, SoCal can look forward to "slightly warmer winters and springs but much warmer summers and falls, with more frequent heat waves," but the burden won't be spread around evenly: "The study predicts a likely tripling in the number of extremely hot days in the downtown area and quadrupling the number in the valleys and at high elevations." But of course higher temps aren't the only threat.

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Forests & Big Data: 5 Deforestation Hotspots Flying Under the Radar

Forests & Big Data: 5 Deforestation Hotspots Flying Under the Radar | green infographics | Scoop.it

We are still losing forests and trees much faster than they can regrow. In fact, we are losing 50 soccer fields worth of trees every minute!

Many are working to reverse tree cover loss in the world’s largest remaining forests: the Amazon Basin, Congo Basin, tropical forests of Indonesia and the vast boreal forests of Russia and Canada. These are worthy goals, considering that just two countries—Brazil and Indonesia—still account for about half of all tropical forest loss.

But several hugely important deforestation hotspots are still flying under the radar. These forest areas don’t get the headlines or resources of the major tropical regions, but are seeing alarming trends or have lost much of their tree cover already.


Visit the link for more the latest data from Global Forest Watch, an online forest monitoring and alert system.

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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | green infographics | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:21 PM

A straightforward map that puts previous knowledge (of the rapidly growing population and the limited food supply) into prescriptive. -UNIT 2

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Mapping All Of The World’s Animals, So We Know Where To Save Them

Mapping All Of The World’s Animals, So We Know Where To Save Them | green infographics | Scoop.it

If your goal is to protect species variety (biodiversity), it helps to have a fine-grained picture. A map showing data for an area 100 by 100 kilometers tells you some useful things about the state of population. But it might miss an awful lot.

"Such a coarse scale of analyzing the data causes many problems," says Clinton Jenkins, a research scholar at North Carolina State. "For instance, a grid cell 100 kilometers across could include multiple Andean Mountain ranges within Colombia, yet we know many species occur only at one or another range, and often only at particular elevations within the mountains."

Jenkins produced these maps, which are about 100-times more fine-grained than normal. They show the diversity (number of species) for mammals, amphibians and birds, across the world. The highest concentrations (red and yellow) are mostly in the tropics. Higher latitudes and deserts are blue, indicating lower numbers of species.

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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, August 6, 2013 9:45 PM

Where the species are is one thing we need to know.  How sensitive they are to our disturbance is the other thing.   We are messing up pretty much everywhere, but this map makes it clear we should probably be even more careful in the tropics.  

 

By the way, the oceans have a few more species, I thought.

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The Hestia Project Maps Carbon Emissions of US Cities Down to Street Level

The Hestia Project Maps Carbon Emissions of US Cities Down to Street Level | green infographics | Scoop.it
A team of researchers from Arizona State University have developed a new software system, called Hestia, that is capable of estimating greenhouse gas emissions across entire urban landscapes, all the way down to street level and individual buildings.

The project, known as Hestia after the Greek goddess of home and hearth, allows the team to combine extensive public database “data-mining” with traffic simulation and building-by-building energy-consumption modeling.

According to researchers, Hestia’s increased detail and accuracy will help cities, and possibly even other nations, identify where an investment in energy and greenhouse gas savings would have the greatest impact...

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Map of the Day: The State of a Warming America

Map of the Day: The State of a Warming America | green infographics | Scoop.it
Temperatures rose in each of the continental 48 states since 1970.

In the United States, the first five months of 2012 have been the warmest on record. More than 100 cities out of 150 recorded have seen their warmest recorded temperatures.

Just a quick glance at this chart gives a good insight into how steamy our cities have been so far this year. But while this year is off-the charts it's not a surprise. We've seen temperatures on the rise for decades, as a new report from Climate Central illustrates.

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Mapping Global Water Stress

Mapping Global Water Stress | green infographics | Scoop.it

Water scarcity is likely to be one of the great problems facing the planet this century. Various risk factors contribute to the scarcity of clean water. A new mapping tool from the World Resources Institute visualizes how those risk factors can combine to create large problems, or how conditions can be improved to reduce the potential for water shortages between now and 2095.

The Water Risk Atlas shows how variable environmental conditions, human activities and regulatory environments affect the stability of water sources all over the world. One-year and three-year socioeconomic droughts can be displayed, as can baseline water stress, seasonal variability, inter-annual variability, and flood frequency. The tool also shows projected water stress levels for the years 2025, 2050 and 2095, under three different climate change scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

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Asia is the world's largest petroleum consumer

Asia is the world's largest petroleum consumer | green infographics | Scoop.it
Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S.

 

This goes nicely with the carbon footprint data that was recently posted.  Although that was data aggregated at the national level and this is on the 'world realms' level, many of the same patterns are visible without the same specificity. 


Via syarifah dalimunthe, Seth Dixon
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