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green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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What Will The Energy Industry Look Like in 2040? | Visual.ly

What Will The Energy Industry Look Like in 2040? | Visual.ly | green infographics | Scoop.it

Will we be depending on more energy or less?

This infographic explores the projection of global demands and effects in 2040...

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Green Energy Around The World: A Collection of Infographics

Green Energy Around The World: A Collection of Infographics | green infographics | Scoop.it

INFOGRAPHICS: Green Energy Around The WorldFollowing on from the popularity of a post from last year, we have put together another fine collection of infographics that show the state of the renewable energy industry here in the UK, in Europe and around the world.

Read on and enjoy!

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The Life of a T-Shirt [Infographic]

The Life of a T-Shirt [Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it
The textiles industry is one of the biggest contributors to landfill waste in both the UK and the US.

The fast fashion model that has developed within our consumerist society is promoting negative consumer behaviour across the globe. Throwaway fashion has become the norm, with customers spending minimal amounts of money on a garment that has an unbelievably short life span, meaning it will no doubt end up in the bin.

This infographic, designed by myself for Urban Times in collaboration with TextĂžure, provides an insight into the statistics behind the life of a t-shirt (bare in mind that it does not include the entire apparel industry), revealing some shocking facts about the water and energy consumption during the production of a simple t-shirt. It also provides some simple yet effective ways in which everyone can help.

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Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture

Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture | green infographics | Scoop.it
There are currently 1 billion people in the world today who are hungry. There's also another billion people who over eat unhealthy foods.

 Food production around the world today is mostly done through industrial agriculture, and by judging current issues with obesity, worldwide food shortages, and the destruction of soil, it may not be the best process. We need to be able to feed our world without destroying it, and finding a more sustainable approach to accomplishing that is becoming more important.

The current system contributes to 1/3 of global emissions, is a polluter of our world’s water resources, and is a contributor to health problems. Industrial agriculture relies on mass produced, mechanized labor-saving policies that have pushed people out of rural areas and into cities, consolidating land and resources into fewer hands.

Agroecology looks to reduces agriculture’s impact on climate by working within natural systems. This is especially beneficial in rural areas, because the local community a major part of the growing process. The approach can conserve and protect soil and water — through terracing, contour farming, intercropping, and agroforestry — especially beneficial in areas where farmers lack modern irrigation infrastructure, or have farms situated on hillsides and other difficult farming sites...

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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, October 1, 2013 6:53 PM

Clearly industrial agriculture is not sustainable, and must be replaced entirely with systems that reverse the current damage and restore the balance that used to exist before we messed things up.  We can use plants and animals not only to feed ourselves, but to *improve* the environment for all life on the planet.

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America and the West’s dirty little secret

America and the West’s dirty little secret | green infographics | Scoop.it
By importing goods from polluting factories in Asia, Americans and others in developed countries underwrite carbon emissions...

 

This is a compelling question: are reductions in greenhouse gases best measured by production or consumption?  The question that this article is posing is essentially trying to find blame for greenhouse gas emmision, but thinking geographically, ponders where along the commodity chain should the bulk of the blame be placed.  What do you think?  


Via Seth Dixon
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Sponsored Infographic: Saving Water with Style

Sponsored Infographic: Saving Water with Style | green infographics | Scoop.it

Levi's has created a line of jeans which requires significantly less water to make.

As the first apparel company to require manufacturers to protect water quality and restrict the use of harmful chemicals, Levi's has helped ensure that water leaving its factories is cleaner than the water that comes in.

Continuing with their commitment to water consciousness, Levi's has created Water<less jeans, which requires significantly less water during the manufacturing process. Click on the infographic to learn more about how the company did it...

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Energy Needs

Energy Needs | green infographics | Scoop.it

"Welcome to Energy Realities, a visual guide to global energy needs, which shows how technology and intelligence are ensuring humanity continues to progress. The site combines maps, multimedia, and writing from three premier publishers and tells the story of energy use, production, sustainability on our planet. We invite you to explore and share this content to help increase understanding and dialogue about our world's energy needs."

 

Energy usage projects to be one of the great geograpical problems of our time.  As ideas such as sustainable economic growth enter the public consciousness, changes to the status quo seem as the more inevitable for the future.  That will the future of consumption look like?  What should it look like?


Via Seth Dixon
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E-Books & E-Readers

E-Books & E-Readers | green infographics | Scoop.it

These days there's a plethora of choices when it comes to e-book readers...

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America’s E-Waste Problem – Infographic

America’s E-Waste Problem – Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

'Following up on an e-Waste post from awhile back, we thought we would put together an infographic about the state of e-Waste in the U.S.  It is a challenging problem for businesses and individuals everywhere, and the issue is much bigger than you may have thought...'


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Hein Holthuizen's comment, April 20, 2013 12:24 AM
thanks for this info
Lance LeTellier's comment, April 24, 2013 12:34 PM
Also, when recycling e-Waste, make sure it is processed in US rather than shipped to third-world countries where it likely sits for years in huge piles where the exposure to the environment causes toxic runoff.
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How Organic is it? (infographic)

How Organic is it? (infographic) | green infographics | Scoop.it

Organic, 100% organic, some of this is organic... it's easy to see why we need a deciphering tool. In an effort to make the best food choices for families and the environment, we often choose organic.

What does the organic label really mean? It tells you that organic meat, poultry, eggs and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones. It is a promise to you that plant foods are produced without using most conventional pesticides. That your fruit and veggies didn’t come to that lovely size and color with use of fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge, bioengineering or ionizing radiation...

This infographic is a straightforward explanation of what organic means to livestock and fruit and vegetables.

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Infographic: Making Internet Data Centers Green

Infographic: Making Internet Data Centers Green | green infographics | Scoop.it

With mobile communications more pervasive than ever, it seems is everyone is talking about cloud computing. While “the cloud” seems intangible, it is actually connected to a global network of physical data centers which are relatively high energy consumers.


Take a look at this infographic to learn more about data centers, their contributions to global CO2 emissions and how to make this rapidly growing industry cleaner and safer for the environment...

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Global CO2 emissions

Animated time-lapse video of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions in map form, spanning the 18th century until this current first decade of the 21st centur...

 

This is not a complete data set, but the video still shows the striking connection between CO2 emissions and  the historical geography of industrialization.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's comment, August 2, 2012 11:21 AM
I'd love to take credit for this, but I didn't create this video, but am simply sharing a resource that I found online with the broader community. Follow the YouTube link to see info about the creator there (Cuagau1).
Mark V's comment, September 4, 2012 8:41 AM
Frightening and guilt inducing. The US and Europe the biggest historical violators, plus living in the northeastern part of the country which shows the highest concentrations.
Rafael CAYUELA's curator insight, February 3, 12:18 PM

Interesting and well done..

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Solar Power - CleanTechnica

Solar Power - CleanTechnica | green infographics | Scoop.it

No other energy source compares to the energy potential of solar. When looking at the images, note that circles for Coal, Uranium, Petroleum, and Natural Gas are TOTAL recoverable reserves whereas the renewable energy circles (including the giant solar energy one) are PER YEAR.
Bottom line: Solar energy is the most abundant energy source on the planet.
For a micro-scale example, the solar energy hitting the state of Texas each month is equal to the total amount of energy the Texas oil and gas industry has ever produced...

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Infographic: Waste Management Trends

Infographic: Waste Management Trends | green infographics | Scoop.it

Here’s a great visualization outlining some trends in waste management.
The infographic below hints toward several trends in the industry: a rising need for home cleaning services, an increase in recycling, and how the percentage of recycling can increase or reduce pressure on industry margins.
For example, according to the data below, only 1 in 2 aluminum cans are recycled. This pressures aluminum suppliers to mine for more, and keeps demand for aluminum high. If recycling rates increase, prices may lower. Similarly, if recycling efforts increase, it will affect profits of management companies that handle waste.
If you’re interested in learning more about the waste management industry, we list the 20 largest companies (trading on the U.S. exchanges) below. If you wish to analyze any of the names further, you can click on the stock icons and links to access free tools on Kapitall.com.

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Data analysis and Climate change

Data analysis and Climate change | green infographics | Scoop.it

Why is there scientific consensus regarding climate change but there are still data-driven arguments against it?  This is a simple, but effective way to show how temporal or spatial scale impacts the phenomenon that you are observing. 

This image from Skeptical Science is a great illustration of how data can be manipulated to serve your purpose. It shows how skeptics point to small declines in temperature by comparing warm years with cold ones seven to 10 years later -- but if you trace the trend over 40 years, you see an obvious warming pattern. Temperatures may cycle over the decades, but each cycle gets a little warmer...


Via Seth Dixon
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How Slowing Down 300 Million Electric Motors Will Save the World [Infographic] | Earth and Industry

Electric motors things like pumps, fans and blowers consume around 28 percent of the world's electricity. But that could change if we just had the ability to slow them down.
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