green infographics
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creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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An Eye-Opening Map of the Future of Global Development

An Eye-Opening Map of the Future of Global Development | green infographics | Scoop.it

By 2050, the world’s population is projected to approach nine billion. With more people will come more developed land—a lot more.

Urbanization, agriculture, energy, and mining put 20 percent of the world’s remaining forests, grasslands, and other natural ecosystems at risk of conversion by 2050.

With that kind of expansion, there are sure to be harms—namely clean water, clean air, and biodiversity. 

To mitigate some of those risks, scientists and geographers at the Nature Conservancy have taken a crucial step by mapping the potential impact that human growth will have on natural lands.

It’s the most comprehensive look to date at how major forms of development will take over fragile ecosystems, if left unchecked...

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Monitoring Marine Ecosystems: Ocean Acidification and New Efforts in Real Time Assessment

Monitoring Marine Ecosystems: Ocean Acidification and New Efforts in Real Time Assessment | green infographics | Scoop.it
Scientists have developed a satellite technique to capture a near real-time view of ocean acidification.

Their findings, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, showing how data from satellites that measure salinity and other ocean conditions could be combined to produce a new way of monitoring acidification.

Oceans are taking in about 90 percent of the excess heat created by human greenhouse gas emissions, but they’re also absorbing some of the carbon dioxide (CO2) itself. 

A set of chemical processes dissolves that CO2 and turns it into carbonic acid and sets off a complex changes to the chemistry of seawater, which dissolves shells and coral and creates a cascade effect that could disrupt entire marine ecosystems.

A recent study estimated $1 trillion annually in losses caused by ocean acidification by 2100, if left unmitigated. Some research has looked at “designer” corals and other creatures that could survive more acidic seas but more work needs to be done to figure out just what will thrive (or at least survive) the changing acidity...

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Infographic: Can Insects Feed A Hungry Planet?

Infographic: Can Insects Feed A Hungry Planet? | green infographics | Scoop.it

Around the world two billion people eat insects on a regular basis. The current hotbeds — or should we say, hot pots — of consumption include Latin America, central Africa and Southeast Asia. As we look for new ways to feed a burgeoning global population, will entomophagy spread to other corners of the globe?

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A Map of History's Biggest Greenhouse Gas Polluters

A Map of History's Biggest Greenhouse Gas Polluters | green infographics | Scoop.it

A select few countries have been responsible for the majority of the world's CO2 emissions since the '70s.

To know the biggest CO2 spewers in recent history, have a look at these animated maps from the Paris-based data designer "JeremY Boy." They show the countries responsible for the bulk of emissions since 1971, with pulsating, foul-looking clouds each representing 300 million tonnes of C02. Note that some countries are left blank due to missing or incomplete information (certain governments don't accurately track bunker fuels, for instance), and that the data refers only to emissions from burning fossil fuels, not smaller sources like incinerating waste materials.

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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, March 29, 2014 9:34 AM

But while emissions are a global problem, the blame for producing them is not. A few countries have been disproportionately responsible for clouding the air with climate-bending gases. And though they may have cleaned up their act in recent years, significant damage has already been done.

 
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Google's Next Goal: To Stop Deforestation with Global Forest Watch

Google's Next Goal: To Stop Deforestation with Global Forest Watch | green infographics | Scoop.it

Deforestation has long been cited as a problem, but a lack of accessible data meant that the general public had to take someone's word for the figures. As a result, its threat always seemed more abstract and nebulous than, say, climate change or rising sea levels.


Until now: Google has unveiled its Global Forest Watch, an online tool that monitors deforestation around the world in near-real time.

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Antonio Lopez's curator insight, February 28, 2014 6:05 AM

One role of media should be to act like those speed monitors we see that tell us how fast we are going. Hopefully a program like Google's Global Forest Watch can help us monitor deforestation in real time.

thinking peasant's curator insight, February 28, 2014 6:51 AM

maybe they have not gone over to the dark side for good?

Daniel LaLiberte's comment, March 10, 2014 11:59 AM
Another writeup at: http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-26287137
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The Global Population in 2100

The Global Population in 2100 | green infographics | Scoop.it
Solving many of the world’s biggest environmental challenges may have just gotten more difficult.

The Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the UN recently released population data indicating the midline estimate - more than 10.8 billion by 2100 - is 800 million higher than the 2010 prediction.

Today’s rural-to-urban migration will continue in full force, with upwards of 84% of the planet living in cities at the close of the century (compared to 52 % today).

Of course population isn’t the only factor contributing to humans’ planetary impact. Consumption may be equally important when looking at the drivers of environmental change across the Earth. Nevertheless, population will continue to be a major consideration as we work to address issues ranging from energy and food security to water availability, species loss, pollution, urban planning and more in the decades ahead...

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Aleasha Reed's curator insight, September 27, 2013 9:14 AM

By the year 2100 our global population is calculated to reach 10.8 billion. The United States is expected to grow another 150 million by this time. Our population right now is 313.9 million right now. Our big cities will continue to grow, and new ones will arise as the years pass.

M-Christine Lanne's curator insight, November 11, 2013 2:44 AM

La démographie, une donnée déterminante  pour l'évolution du climat et la pression sur les ressources naturelles. Nous finissons hélas par être trop nombreux sur terre pour ce qu'elle peut supporter au rythme actuel...

MissPatel's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:09 AM

A future to look forward to? Your potential future? Good, bad or ugly? 

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NOAA's new interactive map shows all the vegetation on the planet

NOAA's new interactive map shows all the vegetation on the planet | green infographics | Scoop.it

Thanks to the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite, NOAA has put together an incredible interactive map of the world's greenery, we can now see to an amazing degree of detail which parts of the planet is covered in green and which are bare.

The map is thanks to the ability of the satellite to collect 2 TB of data every week -- and that's only the portion of data collected for the vegetation index...

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alistairm 's curator insight, June 24, 2013 3:54 AM

I'm hoping we'll see seasonal changes too! Great potential for looking at conservation issues, biodiversity, urban encroachment etc

Steve Mattison's curator insight, July 19, 2013 9:36 AM

It is a lot greener than you would think considering all the slash and burn hype the media puts out.

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Energy Efficiency in Data Centers | infographic

Energy Efficiency in Data Centers | infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

This infographic details the huge amount of energy used by data centers worldwide and how they can become more energy efficient...

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Green Energy Around The World: A Collection of Infographics

Green Energy Around The World: A Collection of Infographics | green infographics | Scoop.it

INFOGRAPHICS: Green Energy Around The WorldFollowing on from the popularity of a post from last year, we have put together another fine collection of infographics that show the state of the renewable energy industry here in the UK, in Europe and around the world.

Read on and enjoy!

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An Integrated Perspective: the 2013 Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report

An Integrated Perspective: the 2013 Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report | green infographics | Scoop.it
The new Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report ranks energy systems of 105 countries from an integrated economic, environmental and energy security perspective.

The findings reveal that high-income countries have proven best at managing the transition to a new energy architecture. Norway ranks in first place in the index, where a strong energy policy coupled with multiple energy resources has delivered cheap, plentiful and relatively clean power and generated large national revenues.
However, the index also finds that high-income and rapidly growing countries alike often underperform across a wide range of environmental sustainability metrics. With demand for energy rapidly increasing at the same time as some nations are reconsidering costly renewable obligations and CO2 targets, the report calls for affirmative action to address this.
Lauren Moss's insight:

For a visual representation of the statistics, visit the link at the article for the report's interactive map, ranking countries on a numerical scale on the following categories:

  • overall performance
  • economic growth and development
  • environmental sustainability
  • energy access and security
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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, December 11, 2012 8:39 PM

The scale and complexity of the global energy industry demands a country-by-country approach to managing change,” said Arthur Hanna, Managing Director, Energy Industry, Accenture, and a Member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on New Energy Architecture. “The Energy Architecture Performance Index helps nations take stock of their energy architecture challenges and identify specific focus areas coupled with best-in-class examples to use when managing their transition.

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Infographic: Charting the History of Agriculture & Climate Change

Infographic: Charting the History of Agriculture & Climate Change | green infographics | Scoop.it

A new infographic that maps the progress of the agricultural sector in addressing climate change throughout the history of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiations has been launched on the sidelines of this year’s climate summit in Doha.


“Agriculture is already being hard hit by climate change and the outlook is even worse. However there are options for adaptation, and some of these even bring mitigation co-benefits,” said Bruce Campbell, Director of the Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security research program.
Agriculture supports over 1 million of the world’s rural poor, yet is responsible for 80% of overall deforestation and 31% of total greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing agricultural yields and improving farming techniques are some the ways that could help reduce its overall contribution to climate change.
In addition to tracking the developments and effects climate change has had on global farming communities, the infographic also calls for the creation of a Work Program on Agriculture under the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technology Advice (SBSTA) – a scientific advisory group to the UNFCCC. A new work program could document and share knowledge of improved practices to inform decision-making on agriculture and climate change to the UNFCCC’s Conference of the Parties.


The infographic was created by Farming First, a coalition of farmers associations, engineers and scientists, in partnership with the CGIAR Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security research program (CCAFS) and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT).

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Global Climate at Risk as Nearly 1,200 New Coal Plants Proposed [interactive infographic]

Global Climate at Risk as Nearly 1,200 New Coal Plants Proposed [interactive infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

The World Resources Institute (WRI) released a report, Global Coal Risk Assessment, that analyzes information about proposed new coal-fired plants and other market trends in order to assess potential future risks to the global climate.

The report finds that there are 1,199 new coal power plants in the works, totaling more than 1.4 million megawatts of capacity worldwide. That’s four times the capacity of all the coal-fired power plants in the U.S. Seventy-six percent of the coal plants are proposed for India and China, with the U.S. seventh in the world for coal power plants in development.
According to the WRI, if all of these projects are built, it would add new coal power capacity that is almost four times the current capacity of all coal-fired plants in the U.S.


View the locations of proposed coal-fired power plants by country in this interactive map at the article link.

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INFOGRAPHIC: How food waste has become a huge global problem

INFOGRAPHIC: How food waste has become a huge global problem | green infographics | Scoop.it

Every year, an estimated 1.2 to 2 billion tons of food is wasted—a massive amount of food that, if saved, would be more enough to feed the world’s hungry. Food waste isn’t just a humanitarian issue however; the problem is also a waste of land, water, energy and money. To put food wastage in perspective, Arbtech created an infographic that points out some of the world’s worst offenders and explains how food loss occurs throughout the supply chain. Click through to learn more about food waste and, most importantly, what you can do to help.

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Suzette Jackson's curator insight, May 24, 2015 2:02 AM

Food waste isn’t just a humanitarian issue however; the problem is also a waste of land, water, energy and money.

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Infographic: The Cost Of Living Around The World

Infographic: The Cost Of Living Around The World | green infographics | Scoop.it

Using data collected from Numbeo—the “world’s largest database of user contributed data about cities and countries worldwide”—web resource Movehub has created an infographic that points out the cost of living in different countries around the world. 

According to Movehub, the Consumer Price Index (CPI) was used to determine the living costs in the countries, which takes into account the prices for groceries, transportation, restaurants and utilities. 

Switzerland, Norway, Venezuela and Iceland have been identified as countries with the highest living cost, while India, Nepal, Pakistan and Tunisia have the lowest cost of living. 

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Suzette Jackson's curator insight, May 29, 2015 6:08 AM

wondering where your money goes?  the cost of living around the world!

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Heat Mapping the World's Hottest Temperatures

Heat Mapping the World's Hottest Temperatures | green infographics | Scoop.it
The Andrew Sykes Group, a large air conditioning firm based in the UK, has developed this interactive displaying record highs, and current temperatures from select cities across the globe. 

While Climate Central's interactive tool (displaying the average temperature cities across the U.S. are expected to reach by 2100) did little to make those of us suffering a sweltering summer feel optimistic about the future, the interactive graphic at the link provides some perspective that current temperatures could be worse.

The Andrew Sykes Group has developed this interactive displaying record highs, and current temperatures from select cities across the globe. Smaller nodes represent cities, while larger nodes stand for the hottest temperatures ever seen on each continent.

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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, August 9, 2014 8:08 PM

The Andrew Sykes Group has developed this interactive displaying record highs, and current temperatures from select cities across the globe. Smaller nodes represent cities, while larger nodes stand for the hottest temperatures ever seen on each continent.

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Forests & Big Data: 5 Deforestation Hotspots Flying Under the Radar

Forests & Big Data: 5 Deforestation Hotspots Flying Under the Radar | green infographics | Scoop.it

We are still losing forests and trees much faster than they can regrow. In fact, we are losing 50 soccer fields worth of trees every minute!

Many are working to reverse tree cover loss in the world’s largest remaining forests: the Amazon Basin, Congo Basin, tropical forests of Indonesia and the vast boreal forests of Russia and Canada. These are worthy goals, considering that just two countries—Brazil and Indonesia—still account for about half of all tropical forest loss.

But several hugely important deforestation hotspots are still flying under the radar. These forest areas don’t get the headlines or resources of the major tropical regions, but are seeing alarming trends or have lost much of their tree cover already.


Visit the link for more the latest data from Global Forest Watch, an online forest monitoring and alert system.

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Putting All the World’s Water into a Big Cube

Putting All the World’s Water into a Big Cube | green infographics | Scoop.it

All the water underground, on the surface, and in the atmosphere amounts to about 332 million cubic miles. That makes a cube with a side of 693 miles, whose base stretches from Indianapolis to Denver. You couldn't even fill the Pacific with the water in that cube, let alone everything else.  

So, the big takeaway here is that the Earth’s oceans are nothing more than a thin film on the surface of the Earth, relatively speaking.


And how big would a cube of just the fresh water be?  It would have sides 202 miles long and sit nicely on top of Iowa.

And the drinkable water cube? Its sides would be 29 miles long and it would fit into Rhode Island.

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Investing in Green [INFOGRAPHIC]

Investing in Green [INFOGRAPHIC] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Use this infographic to track new financial investment in renewable energy companies, utility-scale generation and biofuel projects globally...

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Dawn Mullen's curator insight, July 17, 2013 5:11 PM

Would it not be nice if we all got onboard on the GREEN movement?  I live in Southwest Florida where solar and wind could be so much more utilized.  Let me know what you think. Would you like more solar or wind power?

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World Health Day - Battle of the Cities | Infographic

World Health Day - Battle of the Cities | Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

Is your city the fittest? In honor of World Health Day MapMyFitness hosted a global challenge to find the fittest cities.


The Battle of the Cities contest encouraged users worldwide to log workouts for city points. The winners were chosen based on the percentage of increased activity over the weekend compared to the last 30 days. Over 18,000 cities competed and the results are in...

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Jim Gramata's curator insight, April 12, 2013 9:55 AM

Way to get fit Chicago. We take first place...where's the medal?

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11,000 Years' Worth of Climate Data

11,000 Years' Worth of Climate Data | green infographics | Scoop.it

New research takes the deepest dive ever into historic climate records.


Back in 1999 Penn State climate scientist Michael Mann released the climate change movement's most potent symbol: The "hockey stick," a line graph of global temperature over the last 1,500 years that shows an unmistakable, massive uptick in the twentieth century when humans began to dump large amounts of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. It's among the most compelling bits of proof out there that human beings are behind global warming, and as such has become a target on Mann's back for climate denialists looking to draw a bead on scientists.


Now it's gotten a makeover: A study published in Science reconstructs global temperatures further back than ever before -- a full 11,300 years. The new analysis finds that the only problem with Mann's hockey stick was that its handle was about 9,000 years too short...

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Global Gouging: A Survey of Fuel Prices Around the World

Global Gouging: A Survey of Fuel Prices Around the World | green infographics | Scoop.it

In spite of increasing domestic oil production, four-dollar-per-gallon gasoline remains an on-again/off-again reality in the United States.


That’s because oil and gas are global commodities, and the U.S. market isn’t as insular as we might like. The prices we pay, however, still stand out as cheap. Most of our global neighbors see fuel prices at the pump so high that even the most bumptious Texas oilman would blush. We’ve assembled the costs of a gallon of the most popular juice in every country we could—be it leaded crud in Ghana, sugar-derived ethanol in Brazil, or near avgas in Bahrain—based on the most recent data available...


Check out some of the pricing highs and lows on the dimensional map of fuel prices around the world.

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PowerPoint & Keynote Solutions from Chillibreeze's curator insight, January 5, 2013 7:51 PM

This is kind an infomap. Notice how fuel prices are indicated for each country. I will continue  searching for examples of maps that communicate.

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Oil Consumption and GDP [infographic]

Oil Consumption and GDP [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it
This Infographic displays oil consumptions and gross domestic product, by year and country.

It summarizes and offers a comparison of annual oil consumption and gross domestic product per capita (in dollars) for USA, China, France, Gernany, India, Japan and Russia...

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Electric Car's comment, February 26, 2013 4:17 AM
No problem :)
Clara Dunphy's curator insight, January 30, 2014 2:44 PM

China is still main consumer of oil

Mr Jones's curator insight, January 31, 2014 4:55 AM

Excellent spot by Clara. Oil provides a great link for us between the Econ1 and Econ2 parts of the course

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Water: Global facts + statistics [infographic]

Water: Global facts + statistics [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Ever notice how we ask for “just water” at a restaurant? Like the source of all life is somehow inferior to soda or a glass of wine (both of which are mostly water)? A new infographic gives you just about every fact you need to know about water… including the ways we’re wasting it.

Take a look, and stop by the original article to share any other facts about water you wished more people knew. 

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Investing in Green... [infographic]

Investing in Green... [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

In their feature essay, “China’s Green Rise: Growing Ambition, Growing Challenges,” Genia Kostka and Sarah Eaton detail the rise of China’s green energy sector.

Here, we consider the bigger picture. This infographic details global investment in utility-scale green energy companies and projects between 2004 and 2010...

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