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creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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What Will The Energy Industry Look Like in 2040? | Visual.ly

What Will The Energy Industry Look Like in 2040? | Visual.ly | green infographics | Scoop.it

Will we be depending on more energy or less?

This infographic explores the projection of global demands and effects in 2040...

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Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic)

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | green infographics | Scoop.it

For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future.

In the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned “arcology” - a word that combines “architecture” and “ecology," with a goal of building structures to house large populations in self-contained environments with a self-sustaining economy and agriculture.
 
“In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri)
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luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 4:42 AM
For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future as giant structures that contain entire metropolises. To some, these buildings present the best means for cities to exist in harmony with nature, while others forsee grotesque monstrosities destructive to the human spirit. In the mid-20th century, engineer and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller imagined city-enclosing plastic domes and enormous housing projects resembling nuclear cooling towers. These ideas are impractical but they explore the limits of conventional architectural thinking.  Science fiction writers and artists often imagine future architecture that oppresses the human spirit. Megastructures such as the pyramid-like Tyrell Buildings of “Blade Runner” dominate a decrepit skyline. The decaying old city is simply covered with layers of newer, larger buildings in a process of “retrofitting.” Beginning in the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned a more humane approach. The word “arcology” is a combination of “architecture” and “ecology.” The goal is to build megastructures that would house a population of a million or more people, but in a self-contained environment with its own economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri) In 1996, a group of 75 Japanese corporations commissioned Soleri to design the one-kilometer-tall Hyper Bulding, a vertical city for 100,000 people. Existing in harmony with nature, the Hyper Building was designed to recycle waste, produce food in greenhouses, and use the sun’s light and heat for power and climate control.  The structure was designed for passive heating and cooling without the need for machinery. An economic recession put the brakes on the project and it was never built. Soleri’s arcology concept is being put to the test in the Arcosanti experimental community being built in Arizona. Construction began in 1970. When complete the town will house 5,000 people. Buildings are composed of locally produced concrete and are designed to capture sunlight and heat. To be built in the desert near Abu Dhabi, Masdar is a 2.3-square-mile (6 sq km) planned city of 40,000 residents. Buildings are designed to reduce reliance on artificial lighting and air conditioning, and the city will run entirely on solar power and renewable energy. Begun in 2006, the project is planned for completion around 2020-2025.
Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 9, 2013 2:44 AM

Amazing and beautiful analysis!! Believe it or not, the science fiction also has something to teach us about the city of tomorrow.

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Infographic: The Car of the Future

Infographic: The Car of the Future | green infographics | Scoop.it

Will the steering wheel, brakes and gas pedal be replaced with sensors and software?

Cars that talk to each other are being tested in Ann Arbor, Mich., in the largest vehicle-to-vehicle pilot in the nation, and testing of self-driving cars has been approved in both California and Nevada. In fact, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) predicts that in 2040, 75 percent of cars on the road will be self-driving.

A recent press release on Top 10 Future Car Technologiesfrom Total Car Score mirrors much of the information from the following infographic from InsuranceQuotes.com, which shows what other features cars in the future might have. Think super fuel efficiency, media on demand, voice control and zero maintenance...

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Mercor's curator insight, January 31, 2013 7:04 AM

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Sustainable Energy Roadmaps | Worldwatch Institute

Sustainable Energy Roadmaps | Worldwatch Institute | green infographics | Scoop.it

Transitioning from a carbon-intensive economy to a low-carbon future presents challenges and opportunities for developing countries. The Sustainable Energy Roadmaps help countries successfully navigate the change to an infrastructure capable of meeting the energy challenges of the 21st century.


The approach examines a country’s potential for renewable energy production such as wind, solar, small hydropower and biomass. Existing energy infrastructure is analyzed to identify the potential for, and hurdles to, increased efficiency and energy storage. At the same time, current socio-economic and policy environments are factored into the analysis to identify barriers to low-carbon development and determine international best practices to suggest how they can be overcome. Equally important, funding options that might be available from private, public, and multilateral institutions to help bring renewable energy projects into being are assessed.

The project strengthens government and civil society capacity, enhances stakeholder engagement, and advances policies that combat climate change...


Learn more about the program and sustainable energy roadmaps at the article link.

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Michelle Coe's curator insight, October 10, 2013 10:27 AM

Some US states need to follow this roadmap!

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Sustainable Development - Infographic: Inclusive Green Growth

Sustainable Development - Infographic: Inclusive Green Growth | green infographics | Scoop.it
Why is inclusive green growth necessary?

The world's population is predicted to reach 9 billion people by 2050, and they will all need food, water, and energy to survive. Our current growth patterns are highly inefficient and stand in the way of truly sustainable development. The way forward is inclusive green growth that is clean in its treatment of the environment, efficient in its use of natural resources, resilient, and meets the needs of all people.

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Mariana Soffer's comment, June 17, 2012 4:50 AM
this is great
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Infographic: 7 Billion People – What It Means For The World

Infographic: 7 Billion People – What It Means For The World | green infographics | Scoop.it
On October 31st 2011, the world reached a population milestone of 7 billion

people. How will population growth trends change over the next few years?

With an ever-increasing population, further strains will be placed on our global resources, including food, water and energy. But with newer technology emerging every day, can the world cope with its rising population?

This infographic explores population growth, as well as provide facts and statistics for the future of our society.

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What’s Your Economic Outlook?

What’s Your Economic Outlook? | green infographics | Scoop.it
How do you feel about your job status, the future of the economy and the prospects for the next generation? Readers are sharing their expectations.
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The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic

The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic | green infographics | Scoop.it

Have you ever wondered where you or your children may be living in 2050?
Experts predict that by then three-quarters of the world's population will live in cities. For part of its 
Tomorrow's Cities season the BBC takes a look through the crystal ball to imagine what city life might be like in 40 years' time.

Find more details at the interactive graphic at the link.

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, August 23, 2013 1:15 PM

Here's some ideas on how we might live in the future. What do you think?

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ARUP's Urban Skyscraper: A Design Proposal for the Year 2050

ARUP's Urban Skyscraper: A Design Proposal for the Year 2050 | green infographics | Scoop.it

In the article entitled “It’s Alive,” the design team at engineering firm ARUP envision a city building in the year 2050 that includes flexible modular pods, urban agriculture, climate-conscious facades and intelligent building systems. ARUP hopes the proposal will ultimately answer the question, "As city living takes center stage, what will we come to expect from the design and function of urban structures and buildings?".


ARUP’s futuristic skyscraper will be a “smart” building that will plug into a smart urban infrastructure, and cater to an expanding and technological society. By 2050, the global population will reach nine billion, 75% of which will live in cities. Significantly, this date will also mark a generation of adults that have lived their entire lives engaging with smart devices and materials. The design theory is that the population of 2050 is likely to be in constant flux, and therefore buildings and materials that surround this urban lifestyle must also be capable of evolution and change.

ARUP has imagined a building of the future that produces more than it consumes. Alongside the sustainable construction, the design will feature photovoltaic capability to capture and transmit energy using on-site fuel cells. In addition, energy will be harnessed from elevators or similar internal systems, along with wind turbines and algae-producing bio-fuel pods...

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Mercor's curator insight, February 14, 2013 4:01 AM

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Duane Craig's curator insight, February 20, 2013 8:54 AM

Whike true sustainabiity in buildings is probably not possible, this moves closer to it.

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Charting Anticipated Solar Power Prices through 2025

Charting Anticipated Solar Power Prices through 2025 | green infographics | Scoop.it
A new survey of experts shows solar power will become much cheaper through 2025, while expanding greatly, but for these trends to continue for the long term will require a commitment to funding research.
Prices for solar modules—the part of solar panels that produce electricity—will continue to fall, in line with the long-term trend since 1980, according to a survey of experts by Near Zero, a nonprofit energy research organization.
To get a sense of what future prices for solar power are likely to be, as well as other challenges and bottlenecks that the industry faces, Near Zero conducted a formal, quantitative survey from leaders in the industry, universities, and national labs, as a means of formally collecting expert judgments on a topic. By aggregating forecasts made independently by a variety of experts, these results reflect the collective wisdom of the group about how the solar power industry is most likely to develop, and also help to characterize the range of uncertainty about the future...
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Infographic: The Global Water Crisis

Infographic: The Global Water Crisis | green infographics | Scoop.it
Despite the critical role that water has in our everyday lives, few people realize that the world’s freshwater supply is facing a major crisis in the near future.

Take a look at this infographic for more details, statistics and data on the 'invisible threat to humanity's future' to help increase awareness with regard to the global water crisis...

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Storytelling our energy future

Storytelling our energy future | green infographics | Scoop.it
How we come to believe what we think we know is a key question for those who would guide the future of energy, the climate, and the many other challenges that now face humanity.

 

It turns out that how we think isn’t quite as rational as we might believe.

 

Behavioral scientist Daniel Kahneman has an excellent lecture on this subject, which was highlighted last week on Andrew Revkin’s Dot Earth blog. Drawing on the body of scientific research on how we think, Kahneman breaks down our thinking processes into two systems.

What he calls System 1 is how most of us operate most of the time. It’s automatic, and draws effortlessly on associative memory. It’s what your mind does when you hear “two plus two.” It’s intuitive, instinctive, and immediate, and it biases what you perceive toward what you already think you know in order to produce stories that “make sense.” We trust System 1 because it’s fast and efficient and mostly correct. With System 1, the conclusions come first, and then the arguments.

 

The other way of thinking he calls System 2. It’s what your brain does when you hear “17 times 24.” It’s characterized by deliberate, analytical work. It’s what controls your behavior when you have to make a left turn into traffic, or read a map, or fill out an income tax form. It’s a logical, sequential way of thinking, which is related to control, attention, and rule-governed behavior.
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The Future of Solar

The Future of Solar | green infographics | Scoop.it

The U.S. Government has recently set ambitious goals for renewable energy. Here, we take a look at the energy landscape over the past 60 years and the role of solar energy in achieving those goals.

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When Sea Levels Attack

When Sea Levels Attack | green infographics | Scoop.it

Changes in global sea level due to rising temperatures...

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