green infographics
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green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
Curated by Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Geography Education
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Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted

Rising Seas: If All The Ice Melted | green infographics | Scoop.it
Explore the world’s new coastlines if sea level rises 216 feet.

Via Seth Dixon
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Brian Hammerstix's curator insight, November 23, 2013 7:29 PM

#stopburningfossilfuels or #goodbyeflorida

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:15 PM

Aside from the mass devastation i think it would be pretty cool of all the ice melted. As the interactive map shows there would be in inland sea in australia which i can turn into the AUs great lakes. Also imagine the possiblility of being able to take a vacation to antartica and not having to dress for absurdly negative tempatures, all the undiscovered land and preservated fossils. It would be a interestling link to the past that only in the future we could experience.

Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:20 AM

Would Belgium be covered in water if all the ice melted?

Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Geography Education
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Unexpected Consequences

Unexpected Consequences | green infographics | Scoop.it

Climate change has numerous casualities: the melting of the Arctic Sea ice is one such environment nightmare that's a result of global warming (don't worry Texans, you can just call it a "freak heat wave" or an "inexplicable anomaly").   But like all global processes, not all places are impacted equally.  Even in an economic recession, some find fortune while the majority flounder.  Same is true with the melting of the Artic; the melting might potentially opening up the fabled Northwest Passage and create new, seasonal shipping lanes.  Who would benefit from this?  Who would suffer?  To see a short video on this, see: http://www.economist.com/blogs/dailychart/2011/09/melting-arctic-sea-ice-and-shipping-routes  


Via Seth Dixon
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No Politics, Just Science: A New App Explains Climate Change

No Politics, Just Science: A New App Explains Climate Change | green infographics | Scoop.it
"Climate change": At this point, does that sound more like a political buzzword than a real scientific event? Even though most scientists agree that climate change is well underway, the public's understanding of it lags behind—whether due to confusion, religion, or willful ignorance. Our country's acceptance of the phenomenon has actually retreated in the past few years.

A new, free app for iPhones and iPads called Just Science jolts us back to reality by translating the science of climate change into layperson's terms. The app takes two centuries of data from the comprehensive Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature (BEST) study, then converts it into a color-coded moving map that shows how today's monthly temperatures compare to historical averages since 1800. The result, according to developer Nick Orenstein, is a gradual, everyday reminder of what's happening to the planet.

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EPA maps the worst greenhouse gas offenders

EPA maps the worst greenhouse gas offenders | green infographics | Scoop.it
The EPA has organized its data on major greenhouse gas emitters into a handy interactive map. You can zoom in on your area to see where the emissions come from near you, or scan around for the worst offenders.

This map covers facilities that emit 25,000 metric tons or more of GHGs every year, so it's not like this map shows the sources of all of the country's emissions. There's no transportation, or residential, or agricultural facilities represented. But you're looking at more than half of the United States' GHGs, including all the major polluters.

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Antarctica's Underground

Antarctica's Underground | green infographics | Scoop.it

Using ice penetrating radar, scientists have mapped out the ground and mountains that lie beneath Antarctica’s ice sheets. The project is interesting because it draws on decades of work from many different teams and datasets, and will help create more accurate models of melt rates.

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Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Geography Education
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Data analysis and Climate change

Data analysis and Climate change | green infographics | Scoop.it

Why is there scientific consensus regarding climate change but there are still data-driven arguments against it?  This is a simple, but effective way to show how temporal or spatial scale impacts the phenomenon that you are observing. 

This image from Skeptical Science is a great illustration of how data can be manipulated to serve your purpose. It shows how skeptics point to small declines in temperature by comparing warm years with cold ones seven to 10 years later -- but if you trace the trend over 40 years, you see an obvious warming pattern. Temperatures may cycle over the decades, but each cycle gets a little warmer...


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Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Futurable Planet: Answers from a Shifted Paradigm.
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An Illustrated Guide to the Science of Global Warming Impacts: How We Know Inaction Is the Gravest Threat Humanity Faces

An Illustrated Guide to the Science of Global Warming Impacts: How We Know Inaction Is the Gravest Threat Humanity Faces | green infographics | Scoop.it
Humanity’s Choice (via M.I.T.):  Inaction (“No Policy”) eliminates most of the uncertainty about whether or not future warming will be catastrophic.  Aggressive emissions reductions dramatically improves humanity’s chances.

Via Anne Caspari
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An Antarctica Floe Chart Worthy Of Your Icy Stares | Fast Company

An Antarctica Floe Chart Worthy Of Your Icy Stares | Fast Company | green infographics | Scoop.it

Using new satellite data, scientists have plotted exactly how the ice moves around the South Pole, shining new light on exactly how much water is going to flood into the ocean as the ice melts.

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Visual Loop - Consumerism Stats

Visual Loop - Consumerism Stats | green infographics | Scoop.it
When we look up at the numbers behind the impact of everyday pleasures and think about the ongoing debate about climate change and the all the other environmental impacts caused by that lifestyle, one thing gets clear: we need to change.
Take a look at some of the numbers we’re bringing you here, and think about it.
Or better yet, act upon it.
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Andrew McLaughin's curator insight, March 18, 2014 7:11 PM

When considering this topic it is important to spend time thinking about the overarching issue of waste and consumerism. The infographic points out the issue with plastic production and waste. These products, oftentimes, are disposable very quickly if not immediately. 

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America and the West’s dirty little secret

America and the West’s dirty little secret | green infographics | Scoop.it
By importing goods from polluting factories in Asia, Americans and others in developed countries underwrite carbon emissions...

 

This is a compelling question: are reductions in greenhouse gases best measured by production or consumption?  The question that this article is posing is essentially trying to find blame for greenhouse gas emmision, but thinking geographically, ponders where along the commodity chain should the bulk of the blame be placed.  What do you think?  


Via Seth Dixon
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Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds

Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds | green infographics | Scoop.it

From our friends at NASA comes this amazing 26-second video, depicting how temperatures around the globe have warmed since 1880. That year is what scientists call the beginning of the “modern record.” You’ll note an acceleration of those temperatures in the late 1970s as greenhouse gas emissions from energy production increased worldwide and clean air laws reduced emissions of pollutants that had a cooling effect on the climate, and thus were masking some of the global warming signal. The data comes from NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, which monitors global surface temperatures. As NASA notes, “in this animation, reds indicate temperatures higher than the average during a baseline period of 1951-1980, while blues indicate lower temperatures than the baseline average.”

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Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Sustainable Futures
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Land use poses a critical impact on local climate change

Land use poses a critical impact on local climate change | green infographics | Scoop.it

Clearing forests, installing pavement, planting crops and other land use decisions may be among the most important factors in impacting local climate change.

These decisions impact evaporation, solar radiation and other biophysical effects that may have more impact on local climate than greenhouse gases, which have a more global climate impact.


Via Flora Moon
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Which nations are really responsible for climate change - interactive

Which nations are really responsible for climate change - interactive | green infographics | Scoop.it
There are many ways to view the world's carbon emissions: by national totals or emissions per person; by current carbon output or historical emissions; by production of greenhouse gases or consumption of goods and services; by absolute emissions or economic carbon intensity.

Our interactive map allows you to browse all of these different measurements, each of which provides a different insight. Together they highlight the complexity of divvying up responsibility for climate change and highlight some of the tensions at the heart of the global climate negotiations.

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Interactive Infographic: Could big cities lead the fight against climate change?

Interactive Infographic: Could big cities lead the fight against climate change? | green infographics | Scoop.it

They are the world's cultural capitals, the nerve centers of innovation and the engine rooms of economic growth, but could cities also hold the key to cutting carbon emissions long-term?

A 2010 study from the World Bank found that the 50 largest cities and urban areas on the planet are now home to roughly 500 million people and spew out some 2.6 billion tons of greenhouse gasses every year...

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Global Warning? | Visual.ly

Global Warning? | Visual.ly | green infographics | Scoop.it

This infographic explores the two sides of the ever growing debate on global warming and who is causing it. This infographic provides information for the argument most scientists give and the argument made by skeptics to determine what is more valid and the effects that could happen if we don't do anything about global warming.

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Current Worldwide Carbon Dioxide Emissions per Person

Current Worldwide Carbon Dioxide Emissions per Person | green infographics | Scoop.it
This map shows current worldwide carbon dioxide(CO₂) emissions per person from the consumption of energy. Data includes emissions due to the consumption of petroleum, natural gas, and coal, and also from natural gas flaring.
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