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green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
Curated by Lauren Moss
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Colourful City Clock Diagram Depicts The Pulse Of The City

Colourful City Clock Diagram Depicts The Pulse Of The City | green infographics | Scoop.it

The folks over at Spacing Vancouver have compiled this multi-layered diagram which depicts the operating hours of every business within 200m from the Broadway-City Hall station on Cambie Street. The purpose of this time diagram is to show how "this continuous flow orchestrates the city's metabolism." Check out the complete story from Spacing Vancouver over here.

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Cities Leading the Way in Solar Energy [infographic]

Cities Leading the Way in Solar Energy [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it
Since 2002, the U.S. has increased its installed solar photovolatic capacity by a factor of 200. Which cities are leading the way?

The U.S. now has more than 200 times the amount of installed solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity than it did in 2002, according to a new report from Environment America, and the top 20 cities for this capacity contain more solar power today than the amount installed for the total country six years ago. "Shining Cities: At the Forefront of America's Solar Energy Revolution" looks at which metropolises were in the lead of PV capacity in 2013, and what cities top the country when it comes to capacity per capita. The top cities may not necessarily be the locales you expect, but this data may highlight potential markets that are hot for building PV installations.

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9 Charts That Tell You Where Life Is Pretty Terrific

9 Charts That Tell You Where Life Is Pretty Terrific | green infographics | Scoop.it

The Paris-based think tank known as the OECD is just out with its semi-annual survey of how different economies stack up in terms of social well-being. (Well-being is basically the polite way economists talk about happiness.) The organization even has a new data visualization to let you see where your country ranks in certain key measures.

Called "Society at a Glance," the report is well worth a read. But here are some of the most interesting bits of data we found, in no particular order.

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Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, March 20, 11:47 AM

Un análisis de datos a la VENA!

Russell Roberts's curator insight, March 22, 11:20 AM

Thanks to reporter Matt Phillips of "The Atlantic Cities" website for this revealing set of bar graphs. The data were compiled by the French think tank "OECD" and showed where nations placed on the "social well being" or happiness scale.  The United States didn't do well in a number of areas...perhaps this is something our political leadership should study before they pass legislation that costs us much but delivers so little.    Aloha, Russ.

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2013's Best Performing American Cities

2013's Best Performing American Cities | green infographics | Scoop.it
New rankings from the Milken Institute show just how diverse our tech economy has become.

To the casual observer, the narratives of economic growth in American cities seem fairly obvious: the Sunbelt is adding people, the Rustbelt is failing, and big cities like New York, Chicago, Boston and D.C. are coming back. But the reality is far more complicated once you start adding real-world statistics into the picture.

Each year, the Milken Institute’s "Best Performing Cities" index injects some much-needed clarity into the debates surrounding metro growth and decline. An "outcomes-based" ranking, the report takes into account both short and long-term growth in job numbers, wages and salary, and the concentration and size of high-tech industries — an increasingly important part of success in today’s knowledge-driven economy.

The result is a data-driven look at economic growth in America's 200 largest metropolitan areas.

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The 10 Most Bike-Friendly Cities in the U.S.

The 10 Most Bike-Friendly Cities in the U.S. | green infographics | Scoop.it
Based on the number of bike facilities per square mile, San Francisco is the best city for bikers in the United States.


According to new data, the city has 5.6 bike-able miles per square mile, including on-street bike lanes, multi-use bike paths and signed bike routes. Residents of Austin, Texas, Long Beach, Calif., and Philadelphia rank right below San Francisco.

This annotated map of the U.S., made by Statista, shows the 10 cities in the U.S. with the most bike facilities per square mile, according to data from the Alliance for Biking and Walking.

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Bhopkins's curator insight, November 23, 2013 8:42 AM

10 cities with the most bike facilities per square mile - Baltimore is not on the list.

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The Neighborhood Data Portal Every City Needs

The Neighborhood Data Portal Every City Needs | green infographics | Scoop.it
Los Angeles rolls out interactive neighborhood health profiles covering everything from crime stats to obesity rates.

As the open data movement has matured, public city-wide vital stats have come to feel more like a citizen's right than a civic innovation. This is where things should head next: Take all of that data, map it, connect the dots between public health, land use, economics, education, crime and housing. And portray those patterns – and the inequality they often reveal – down to the neighborhood level.


Los Angeles has recently done just this, rolling out a web tool as part of its Plan for a Healthy Los Angeles that maps a tremendous number of metrics about life in the region, at both the city and neighborhood scales. Just a sampling of the dozens of metrics, via the portal from the L.A. Department of City Planning, the L.A. County Department of Public Health and The California Endowment:

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Infographic: How Our Cities Are Shaping Us

Infographic: How Our Cities Are Shaping Us | green infographics | Scoop.it

Architects and city planners are becoming more and more familiar with the health effects of our built environment.  This to-the-point infographic, designed by Chris Yoon, cites a few ways in which mid-20th century city planning trends have contributed to a growing obesity problem in the United States.  This data has alarmed scientists, planners and city officials into stressing the importance of redesigning the physical spaces so as to encourage physical activity and healthy choices.


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Top 6 Cities Leading The Green Building Revolution | Infographic

Top 6 Cities Leading The Green Building Revolution | Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

Find our which cities are leading the green building revolution--what's working and what they could do better.

Most people agree that green building makes sense–environmentally and financially, and we’re now designing buildings with materials and technologies that conserve energy automatically.


This infographic compares the efforts of six leading cities–New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, London, Amsterdam and Stockholm–providing a bird’s eye view of  how cities are embracing the green revolution in the race to drastically reduce global CO2 emissions.

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Infographic: Watch a City's Pulse in Real-Time

Infographic: Watch a City's Pulse in Real-Time | green infographics | Scoop.it
A new way of collecting data allows a duo of creative coders to archive transit information and update the map every hour, creating a handy tool for trend spotting and comparing traffic.


The first time Andy Woodruff and Tim Wallace created a map of Boston’s bus routes was back in the fall of 2011. Using data from the MBTA, the duo (who write over at Boston-centric blog, Bostonography, charted the paths and speeds of buses over the course of 24 hours.

In the years since they first published the MBTA Bus Speeds, the team has learned better ways to automate mapping. Now, with a bit of coding they can sit back and watch the maps draw themselves. Woodruff and Wallace pull in data from NextBus every hour, and that information is stored in a database. “Image rendering is done by some pretty simple PHP scripts that grab the data, string the points together into lines based on vehicle ID, calculate distances and speeds, then draw thousands of lines.”

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Top 10 Cities with the Greenest Homes

Top 10 Cities with the Greenest Homes | green infographics | Scoop.it

San Francisco and Washington D.C. are two of the country's 10 cities with the greenest homes. The newly released analysis covered each city's overall carbon dioxide emissions and the number of homes for sale with green features or ratings. 


Sustainable features included solar panels, low-flow faucets, dual-pane windows, Energy Star-labeled appliances, LEED certification, and new construction by green builders.

Visit the article link for further information about each top-10 city’s green initiatives.

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Re/Max Atlantic - Pamela Stearns's curator insight, May 1, 2013 12:16 AM

This real-estate service provides homeowners with quality homes through a service that adheres to providing excellent customer quality.

Gary Mitchell's comment, May 2, 2013 4:09 PM
More and more cities are starting to realize how important it is ti be eco friendly
Gary Mitchell's comment, May 2, 2013 4:10 PM
to*
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Urbanist Toolkit Bracket Challenge: Championship Round

Urbanist Toolkit Bracket Challenge: Championship Round | green infographics | Scoop.it

Welcome to the first annual Urbanist Toolkit Bracket Challenge, where the hottest trends in urbanism go head-to-head in a conceptual game that challenges the instincts, tastes, and urban design wisdom of readers.

Here's how it works:

Thirty-two in-form tools of urbanism have been seeded, according to their popularity and utility, into four regional groups: the Ed Koch, the Sidewalk Ballet, the Le Corbusier, and the Dandyhorse. The four #1 seeds -- car share, bike lanes, farmers' markets, and the waterfront promenade -- are paired off against decidedly more obscure options.


It's the nature of an elimination tournament: two urban design features enter, one urban design feature emerges victorious. At the moment we have a choice between Bike Lanes and Pedestrian Street.


The Pedestrian Street easily trumped the Waterfront Promenade, 69-31, to advance to the finals. On the left side of the bracket, Bike Lanes sent congestion pricing back to the theoretical realm, 60-40, in a match-up that many people found particularly aggravating, for reasons that commenter Quinn Raymond elucidated at the very start of the bracket challenge: "The final question is basically, 'Would you rather stab yourself in the face or the chest?'"

(Confused? Check out the Final Four, the Elite Eight, the Sweet Sixteen, or the initial post for more info on the entries.)

Lauren Moss's insight:

An interesting concept in the realm of planning and development: a challenge to determine the urban design elements that readers of the Atlantic Cities prioritize as transformative.

For more details, view previous articles on this inaugural, interactive challenge...

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The Happiest Cities in the World [Infographic]

The Happiest Cities in the World [Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Happiness is a fleeting commodity in reality, it comes and goes, but the perception of happiness is the real bottom-line driver for cities and their branding.


What makes urban dwellers happy? According to a 10,000 respondent, 20 country research effort from GfK Custom Research, it is a location-based perception: does your city offer you places to go that make you happy? Apparently, the perception-reality gap is what is really interesting the city governments. Happiness is a fleeting commodity in reality, it comes and goes, but the perception of happiness is the real bottom-line driver for cities and their branding.

The winning locations end up being quite obvious candidates; entertainment and cultural heavyweights, beautiful urban areas and laid-back lifestyles lead the march...

See more statistics and data at the infographic and article link.

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bancoideas's curator insight, March 4, 2013 9:51 AM

Ciudades felices y ciudades inteligentes son #ideas que siempre deben ir de la mano #smartcities, no te pierdas esta #inforgrafía

Mercor's curator insight, March 4, 2013 10:40 AM

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An Infographic Breakdown Of The World's Greenest Cities

An Infographic Breakdown Of The World's Greenest Cities | green infographics | Scoop.it

This infographic focuses on the cities of London, New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, and Stockholm.


It’s hard to quantify what makes a city "greener" than any other metropolis, but there are some clues: car ownership, green space, bicycle usage, solar installations, recycling, and water consumption are just a few factors that create environmentally responsible cities.

An infographic from HouseTrip lays out what different cities are doing in an easy-to-read format. A handful of major world cities stand out as leaders. This infographic focuses on London, New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, and Stockholm; three of these cities made it into our top 10 smart cities list (two others were runners-up). Each of these cities have statistics worth mentioning. Amsterdam has one bike for every 0.73 people, Copenhagen has legislation requiring all new buildings to have green roofs (this will add 5,000 square meters of vegetation), and only 44% of New Yorkers own a car, compared to 95% of Americans overall.


Visit the link to view the full infographic and to read more about the specific elements that make each featured city 'green'...

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Are These Cities Foreshadowing the End of Sprawl?

Are These Cities Foreshadowing the End of Sprawl? | green infographics | Scoop.it
Are Atlanta, Detroit, and Miami set to put car-dependent development in park and pull forward as the new leaders of walkable urban development?

When it comes to discussing sprawl, Atlanta and Detroit have served as poster children for expansive geographic footprints that create driving-dependent lifestyles. However, new research predicts that these two metropolises may now be representative of the cities transitioning from sprawl-based development to walkable urbanism, signaling a major shift in development and lifestyle patterns. The report, "Foot Traffic Ahead: Ranking Walkable Urbanism in America's Largest Metros" predicts that if current development trends continue, cities such as Atlanta, Detroit, and Miami will bound from the bottom third of the list, where they currently reside, to the top 10 metropolises for walkable urban places...

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INFOGRAPHIC: How Green Cities Can Help Sustain the Future

INFOGRAPHIC: How Green Cities Can Help Sustain the Future | green infographics | Scoop.it

People around the world are moving to urban areas in record numbers – and for the first time ever there’s more people living in cities than in rural areas. This trend is only set to accelerate, so it’s high time to develop solutions to make our cities more sustainable. CityTownInfo just launched a new infographic that shows how greener cities can pave the way to a sustainable future – check it out after the break.

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Norm Miller's curator insight, April 15, 1:24 PM

Mixed use and density does lower resources per capita.  But this is the first estimate I've seen.

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Infographic: How Metro Compares To Other U.S. Transit Systems

Infographic: How Metro Compares To Other U.S. Transit Systems | green infographics | Scoop.it

From the University of North Carolina's School of Government comes this infographic that compares Metro against four other transit systems in major U.S. cities. There's even a comparison of complaints, with D.C.'s three being unreliable service, weekend track work and wait times, and faulty escalators. 

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The 10 Most Walkable Cities In America

The 10 Most Walkable Cities In America | green infographics | Scoop.it

About 30,000 sites now use Walk Score's walkability grading system. The Seattle-based company, has done a lot to encourage people to factor in walkability when deciding where to live.

Walk Score's latest ranking of America's most walkable cities shows the best from last year are still the best today. New York, San Francisco and Boston occupy the first three places, as they did last year. Philadelphia, Miami and Chicago come next. Each is classified as "very walkable," which means "most errands can be accomplished on foot." 

Walk Score assesses proximity to neighborhood amenities, crunching data for 10 million addresses and 2 billion walking routes. This year, it added a couple of extra criteria, including "depth of choice" in an area and "pedestrian friendliness."

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Four Infographics About Resilient Urban Systems

Four Infographics About Resilient Urban Systems | green infographics | Scoop.it

Cities across the globe are witnessing an increasing frequency of extreme weather events. This combined with population growth and urbanization means it is more crucial than ever that the systems that keep our cities functioning are resilient to the complex, uncertain and constantly changing risks that face them.

These four infographics are taken from the new report Toolkit for Resilient Cities, produced by Siemens, Arup and Regional Plan Association (RPA), and feature urban resilience from the perspective of the electricity grid, water systems, buildings and transport.

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The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic

The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic | green infographics | Scoop.it

Have you ever wondered where you or your children may be living in 2050?
Experts predict that by then three-quarters of the world's population will live in cities. For part of its 
Tomorrow's Cities season the BBC takes a look through the crystal ball to imagine what city life might be like in 40 years' time.

Find more details at the interactive graphic at the link.

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, August 23, 2013 4:15 PM

Here's some ideas on how we might live in the future. What do you think?

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Imagining A Future City Filled With Driverless Cars And Without Any Parking Spaces

Imagining A Future City Filled With Driverless Cars And Without Any Parking Spaces | green infographics | Scoop.it

As self-driving cars move from fantasy to reality, what kind of effect will they have on cities?

A research and urban prototyping project called Shuffle City investigates, and in the process, becomes a manifesto for a new kind of modern city--one that depends less on traditional public transportation like buses or light rail and more on creating a fleet of continuously moving automated vehicles to serve urban mobility needs.

Shuffle City looks at the new possibilities that could arise from cities transitioning to cars without drivers. If cars were put into some constant flow as a public good, and if people didn’t all have their own vehicles, there would be no need for the concrete wastelands and lifeless towers that serve as a parking infrastructure in the urban landscapes of car-centric cities like Phoenix and Los Angeles (Under the current ownership model, the average car spends 21 hours per day parked.)

The share of city space ruled by parking lots will shrink, making way for more green space, environmental buffers, workspace, housing, retail, and denser planning for more walkable cities...

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José Antônio Carlos - O Professor Pepe's curator insight, August 7, 2013 8:41 AM

Um desenho da cidade de nossos sonhos. Carros sem motoristas, ruas sem espaço para estacionamento, e por aí vai.

Kim Spence-Jones's curator insight, August 8, 2013 2:53 AM

Interface between cars and homes is an interesting area of R&D. Everything from entertainment synchronising to battery management.

miguel sa's curator insight, September 4, 2013 4:17 PM

Jacque Fresco has been talking about this sort of thing for awhile now, looks like its coming closer to reality~ 

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Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic)

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | green infographics | Scoop.it

For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future.

In the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned “arcology” - a word that combines “architecture” and “ecology," with a goal of building structures to house large populations in self-contained environments with a self-sustaining economy and agriculture.
 
“In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri)
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luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 7:42 AM
For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future as giant structures that contain entire metropolises. To some, these buildings present the best means for cities to exist in harmony with nature, while others forsee grotesque monstrosities destructive to the human spirit. In the mid-20th century, engineer and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller imagined city-enclosing plastic domes and enormous housing projects resembling nuclear cooling towers. These ideas are impractical but they explore the limits of conventional architectural thinking.  Science fiction writers and artists often imagine future architecture that oppresses the human spirit. Megastructures such as the pyramid-like Tyrell Buildings of “Blade Runner” dominate a decrepit skyline. The decaying old city is simply covered with layers of newer, larger buildings in a process of “retrofitting.” Beginning in the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned a more humane approach. The word “arcology” is a combination of “architecture” and “ecology.” The goal is to build megastructures that would house a population of a million or more people, but in a self-contained environment with its own economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri) In 1996, a group of 75 Japanese corporations commissioned Soleri to design the one-kilometer-tall Hyper Bulding, a vertical city for 100,000 people. Existing in harmony with nature, the Hyper Building was designed to recycle waste, produce food in greenhouses, and use the sun’s light and heat for power and climate control.  The structure was designed for passive heating and cooling without the need for machinery. An economic recession put the brakes on the project and it was never built. Soleri’s arcology concept is being put to the test in the Arcosanti experimental community being built in Arizona. Construction began in 1970. When complete the town will house 5,000 people. Buildings are composed of locally produced concrete and are designed to capture sunlight and heat. To be built in the desert near Abu Dhabi, Masdar is a 2.3-square-mile (6 sq km) planned city of 40,000 residents. Buildings are designed to reduce reliance on artificial lighting and air conditioning, and the city will run entirely on solar power and renewable energy. Begun in 2006, the project is planned for completion around 2020-2025.
Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 9, 2013 5:44 AM

Amazing and beautiful analysis!! Believe it or not, the science fiction also has something to teach us about the city of tomorrow.

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Town Square Initiative: New York - Urban Planning and Design Concepts

Town Square Initiative: New York - Urban Planning and Design Concepts | green infographics | Scoop.it

The Town Square Initiative is a yearlong volunteer effort in which Gensler designers set out to unearth and re-imagine unexpected open space in cities around the globe. All 43 Gensler offices were invited to participate in the conceptual project, in which we challenged our designers to identify open space in the city and reimagine it as a town square.


Visit the link for more images, diagrams and information on Gensler New York’s design of their future city.

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World Health Day - Battle of the Cities | Infographic

World Health Day - Battle of the Cities | Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

Is your city the fittest? In honor of World Health Day MapMyFitness hosted a global challenge to find the fittest cities.


The Battle of the Cities contest encouraged users worldwide to log workouts for city points. The winners were chosen based on the percentage of increased activity over the weekend compared to the last 30 days. Over 18,000 cities competed and the results are in...

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Jim Gramata's curator insight, April 12, 2013 9:55 AM

Way to get fit Chicago. We take first place...where's the medal?

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Visualizing a Walkable City

Visualizing a Walkable City | green infographics | Scoop.it

The city of Pontevedra in northwest Spain has become a leader in walker-friendly urban policy over the past 15 years. As the capital of its province, county and municipality, Pontevedra attracted enough automobile commuters each day to overwhelm its antiquated streets.

In response, instead of razing old buildings and constructing bigger roads, the city council widened sidewalks, established a free bike-lending service, installed speed bumps and set a speed limits of 30 kilometers per hour. They even banned motorized transport in sections of Pontevedra. Walking zones now extend from the historic center to streets and squares in newer neighborhoods. Although the driving ban initially faced resistance, it is now broadly supported and has become an essential part of the city's identity as an attractive place to live...


To further improve walkability, Pontevedra's city council produced a map that visualizes the distances and travel times between key places on foot. Known as Metrominuto, the map has color-coded lines that resemble those of a subway guide. Free parking areas are marked to encourage visitors to leave their cars outside the city center. Metrominuto reminds residents and visitors that many automobile trips can be made in a more convenient, environmentally friendly and healthy way by walking.

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ryanleonard's comment, April 20, 2013 7:25 AM
nice
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ARUP's Urban Skyscraper: A Design Proposal for the Year 2050

ARUP's Urban Skyscraper: A Design Proposal for the Year 2050 | green infographics | Scoop.it

In the article entitled “It’s Alive,” the design team at engineering firm ARUP envision a city building in the year 2050 that includes flexible modular pods, urban agriculture, climate-conscious facades and intelligent building systems. ARUP hopes the proposal will ultimately answer the question, "As city living takes center stage, what will we come to expect from the design and function of urban structures and buildings?".


ARUP’s futuristic skyscraper will be a “smart” building that will plug into a smart urban infrastructure, and cater to an expanding and technological society. By 2050, the global population will reach nine billion, 75% of which will live in cities. Significantly, this date will also mark a generation of adults that have lived their entire lives engaging with smart devices and materials. The design theory is that the population of 2050 is likely to be in constant flux, and therefore buildings and materials that surround this urban lifestyle must also be capable of evolution and change.

ARUP has imagined a building of the future that produces more than it consumes. Alongside the sustainable construction, the design will feature photovoltaic capability to capture and transmit energy using on-site fuel cells. In addition, energy will be harnessed from elevators or similar internal systems, along with wind turbines and algae-producing bio-fuel pods...

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Mercor's curator insight, February 14, 2013 7:01 AM

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Duane Craig's curator insight, February 20, 2013 11:54 AM

Whike true sustainabiity in buildings is probably not possible, this moves closer to it.