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green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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Sustaining Seven Billion People

Sustaining Seven Billion People | green infographics | Scoop.it

"With seven billion people now living on Earth, the ever growing demand is putting unprecedented pressure on global resources—especially forests, water, and food. How can Earth’s resources be managed best to support so many people? One key is tracking the sum of what is available, and perhaps nothing is better suited to that task than satellites."



Via Seth Dixon
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Russell Roberts's curator insight, July 6, 12:53 AM

Thanks to environmental reporter Wes Thomas and professor Seth Dixon for this incisive analysis of how to provide sustenance to a world population nearing the 7 billion mark.  Dixon says the key is tracking the "sum of what is available...and perhaps nothing is better suited to the task than satellites."  Ever since the launch of "Landsat" and resource imaging satellites, scientists have been collecting data on global resources such as water, land use, forests, and crop production.  Dixon and Thomas say it's time the data were  put into a plan to fight hunger and habitat destruction around the world.  Such a plan may work if we as humans can keep from killing ourselves over religion, politics, and territory.  A tall order , indeed.  Aloha de Russ.

Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, July 6, 12:09 PM

Such studies of the agriculture around the world are essential. The way we are doing agriculture to support seven billion people now, peaking at 9-10 billion in another 60 years, it is clear that we are putting severe strains on the environment.  But we have grown lazy, and we are doing it all wrong.

 

We CAN drastically reduce the amount of meat we consume, and thus quickly reduce the amount of arable land we need.  We CAN grow plants in ways that actually sequester more carbon and improve the soil it over time rather than erode and degrade.  And we CAN in fact grow all the food we need in the space we live in, thus enabling us to recycle all the water used as well, which is mostly just lost in evaporation. 

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 13, 5:52 AM

Vital debate for the future

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Infographic: Charting the History of Agriculture & Climate Change

Infographic: Charting the History of Agriculture & Climate Change | green infographics | Scoop.it

A new infographic that maps the progress of the agricultural sector in addressing climate change throughout the history of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiations has been launched on the sidelines of this year’s climate summit in Doha.


“Agriculture is already being hard hit by climate change and the outlook is even worse. However there are options for adaptation, and some of these even bring mitigation co-benefits,” said Bruce Campbell, Director of the Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security research program.
Agriculture supports over 1 million of the world’s rural poor, yet is responsible for 80% of overall deforestation and 31% of total greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing agricultural yields and improving farming techniques are some the ways that could help reduce its overall contribution to climate change.
In addition to tracking the developments and effects climate change has had on global farming communities, the infographic also calls for the creation of a Work Program on Agriculture under the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technology Advice (SBSTA) – a scientific advisory group to the UNFCCC. A new work program could document and share knowledge of improved practices to inform decision-making on agriculture and climate change to the UNFCCC’s Conference of the Parties.


The infographic was created by Farming First, a coalition of farmers associations, engineers and scientists, in partnership with the CGIAR Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security research program (CCAFS) and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT).

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Virtual Water: Motion Graphics

Virtual Water: Motion Graphics | green infographics | Scoop.it

Most of the water we use - 92 % of it - is used in food production. Most of this water is managed by the world’s farmers. With the help of science and technology they have performed greater and greater miracles in improving water productivity – in getting more crops per drop.

The good news is that each one of us can also make the world a little more water secure, ready to face the needs of our peak population future.

The answer lies in our shopping baskets...

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USAID Motion Graphic: Powering Agriculture

USAID Motion Graphic: Powering Agriculture | green infographics | Scoop.it

Our world is continually coming up with new ways to use its resources and technological advancements to use them more efficiently. Sometimes it’s easy to forget that there are still people in the world incapable of creating enough food for their families and communities to thrive or sometimes even survive. This motion graphic created by Powering Agriculture, an initiative of the United States Agency of International Development (USAID), looks at how clean energy technology can be the answer.

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The Local Food System

The Local Food System | green infographics | Scoop.it

CITIES is re-interpreting urban farming as an asset for the city economy. This approach to the subject is neither revolutionary nor especially innovative, yet in the collation of an original set of parameters (community activity, urban landscapes and design applications) with existing approaches, new directions emerge...

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Data Farming: Demonstrating the Benefits of Urban Agriculture [INFOGRAPHIC]

Data Farming: Demonstrating the Benefits of Urban Agriculture [INFOGRAPHIC] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Design Trust put together a metrics framework that measured the associated activities of urban agriculture with the known benefits derived from various studies to convince city officials of urban farming's positive impact.


Transforming underutilized land into productive urban farms was one of the many topics which were presented at the recent Kansas City Design Week.  Jerome Chou, past Director of Programs at the Design Trust for Public Space, presented his unique experience with the implementation of the Five Boroughs Farm in New York City and the impact that urban agriculture can have on low-income areas of a city.

Chou pointed out that having the land available for an urban farm is only half of the battle. The other half involves changing local zoning laws, influencing political opinion, garnering economic support, and proving the project will have a net benefit to a community...

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Marcus Taylor's curator insight, August 4, 2013 3:40 AM

Urban Agriculture faces a myriad of challenges to enter the mainstream of urban development in the pursuit of "SmartCities" Worth a browse.

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Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture

Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture | green infographics | Scoop.it
There are currently 1 billion people in the world today who are hungry. There's also another billion people who over eat unhealthy foods.

 Food production around the world today is mostly done through industrial agriculture, and by judging current issues with obesity, worldwide food shortages, and the destruction of soil, it may not be the best process. We need to be able to feed our world without destroying it, and finding a more sustainable approach to accomplishing that is becoming more important.

The current system contributes to 1/3 of global emissions, is a polluter of our world’s water resources, and is a contributor to health problems. Industrial agriculture relies on mass produced, mechanized labor-saving policies that have pushed people out of rural areas and into cities, consolidating land and resources into fewer hands.

Agroecology looks to reduces agriculture’s impact on climate by working within natural systems. This is especially beneficial in rural areas, because the local community a major part of the growing process. The approach can conserve and protect soil and water — through terracing, contour farming, intercropping, and agroforestry — especially beneficial in areas where farmers lack modern irrigation infrastructure, or have farms situated on hillsides and other difficult farming sites...

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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, October 1, 2013 9:53 PM

Clearly industrial agriculture is not sustainable, and must be replaced entirely with systems that reverse the current damage and restore the balance that used to exist before we messed things up.  We can use plants and animals not only to feed ourselves, but to *improve* the environment for all life on the planet.

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ONE | INFOGRAPHIC: Closing the gender gap in land rights

ONE | INFOGRAPHIC: Closing the gender gap in land rights | green infographics | Scoop.it

Although women play an indispensable role in the rural economy, they face severe constraints in accessing the agricultural assets and services they need to maximize their production. It has become increasingly clear that there is a “gender gap” in resources such as land, technology, and extension services; that the gap imposes costs not only on women but also on the broader economy and society; and that closing the gap would improve agricultural productivity and reduce hunger and poverty. Oft-cited statistics from a recent FAO report focus on the gains that could be made if women had equal access to non-land resources. In light of evidence that secure rights to land for women can increase agricultural productivity and confer other household benefits, we at Landesa think it is critical to consider what additional gains could be made if women had equal access to one of the most important assets to agricultural households: land.

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Powering Agriculture: An Energy Challenge For Development

Powering Agriculture: An Energy Challenge For Development | green infographics | Scoop.it
Our world is continually coming up with new ways to use its resources and technological advancements to use them more efficiently.

Sometimes it’s easy to forget that there are still people in the world incapable of creating enough food for their families and communities to thrive or sometimes even survive.

Helping developing and low-income nations step into modern times has been a constant challenge for decades, and expanding access to clean energy is a key component of global development efforts. But, how are we going to do this? This motion graphic created by Powering Agriculture, an initiative of the United States Agency of International Development (USAID), looks at how clean energy technology can be the answer...

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