green infographics
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green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
Curated by Lauren Moss
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Citizen Science – an interactive map of wind visualization and temperature

Citizen Science – an interactive map of wind visualization and temperature | green infographics | Scoop.it

Nicolas Garcia Belmonte has visualized wind motion in the USA- the visualization shows wind direction encoded in line angles, wind speed encoded in line lengths and disk radius, and temperature encoded in hue. All this for about 1200 weather stations across the country.

You can switch between different visual markers from the top menu, also play the wind motion for the 72 hours or select a specific time from the timeline below the graphic...

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Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint

Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint | green infographics | Scoop.it

One of the key things I reinforce in conversations about globalization is that the advantages are unevenly distributed and the negative externalities to the system are also unevenly distributed.  This clever infographic highlights both rather effectively. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Dale Fraza's comment, February 27, 2012 3:26 PM
Really surprised at a couple things:
1. Brazil's relative tinyness in comparison with the U.S. Guess I've always just heard bad things about Brazil in regards to deforestation and the like.
2. Just how much a formerly agricultural nation (China) has exploded. Something really needs to be done about the environmental havoc they are wreaking (not to be a total ethnocentrist or anything).
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Driverless Cars of the Future Are Here Now [INFOGRAPHIC]

Driverless Cars of the Future Are Here Now [INFOGRAPHIC] | green infographics | Scoop.it
Driverless cars have taken giant leaps in the past few years -- in fact, you might see one driving right next to you any day now.

This tech won’t come a moment too soon, either. According to the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Association (NHTSA), distracted driving killed 5,474 people in the U.S. in 2009, and that number is only going to get bigger and scarier.

As you can see in the infographic, help is on the way. Even though ingenious autonomous cars are in the research stage right now, within the next few years you’ll be able to buy one for yourself.

In fact, a lot of that technology is already finding its way into today’s cars. You’re already familiar with GPS, and many cars now have lane-departure warning systems and can park themselves.

The autonomous vehicle sounds spectacular, with the potential to almost eliminate accidents. But the key question: Will people accept the technology? Maybe not at first, but within a couple of decades, I predict we’ll look back at the days of human driving and wonder how we subjected ourselves to such horrific dangers every day...

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Billion Dollar U.S. Weather/Climate Disasters

Billion Dollar U.S. Weather/Climate Disasters | green infographics | Scoop.it
Reports, publications, and data dealing with US weather and climate disasterous events.

 

NOAA notes that in the last 31 years there were 99 weather-related natural disasters that casued $1 billion worth of damage.  So that is a roughly 3 per year (with dollars adjusted for inflation).  In 2011, there were 14 natural disasters in the United States that caused over $1 billion in damage.  

 

Is this primarily due to climate change?  Are all of components of these natural disaters 'natural?'  What does this information say about the human-environmental interactions that we see today?    


Via Seth Dixon
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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, December 10, 2013 7:29 PM

I don’t really know if this is due to climate changes. I do think that yeah we could call it “natural disaster” to the act but all those millions of dollar spended to fix all the damages cost by a hurricane, earthquake. They should be invested in preventing the damages. I do understand that those disaster cannot be prevented but the damages caused by definitely can be.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:57 AM

It is incredible how powerful these natural disasters are. The disasters are very costly because they destroy so much and they consume so much time to rebuild. it is devastating the after math of these natural disasters. it seems that the us is getting the most disasters because we are the one that spends the most of building and helping other countries when they get hurt. One good example is the Philippines disaster in which killed and put hundreds of people out of there homes.

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Energy Needs

Energy Needs | green infographics | Scoop.it

"Welcome to Energy Realities, a visual guide to global energy needs, which shows how technology and intelligence are ensuring humanity continues to progress. The site combines maps, multimedia, and writing from three premier publishers and tells the story of energy use, production, sustainability on our planet. We invite you to explore and share this content to help increase understanding and dialogue about our world's energy needs."

 

Energy usage projects to be one of the great geograpical problems of our time.  As ideas such as sustainable economic growth enter the public consciousness, changes to the status quo seem as the more inevitable for the future.  That will the future of consumption look like?  What should it look like?


Via Seth Dixon
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New York City Energy Use All Over the Map

New York City Energy Use All Over the Map | green infographics | Scoop.it
New York City’s appetite for energy is immense, making it a revealing case study for how people use — and waste — energy.

“Midtown Manhattan has more energy use than the whole country of Kenya, and New York state uses more energy than all of sub-Saharan Africa,” said Vijay Modi, a professor of mechanical engineering at Columbia University. “There is just this intense use of energy in cities like New York.”

A new project by Modi and graduate student Bianca Howard aims to put the city’s energy consumption on the map. The results of their work are displayed on an interactive map estimating the total annual energy consumption for nearly every building across the five boroughs.

Their research allows New Yorkers to get a rough idea of how much energy is used inside their homes, offices and businesses — and it offers a peek into the building next door, down the street and across the city. The goal of the project is to take some of the mystery out of energy usage..

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What Goes In & Out of Hydraulic Fracking

What Goes In & Out of Hydraulic Fracking | green infographics | Scoop.it

Hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking”, is the process of drilling and injecting fluid into the ground at a high pressure in order to fracture shale rocks to release natural gas inside.

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Brad Wells's curator insight, October 21, 2014 12:14 PM

Jeffrey 

shows how fracking is done as a water drop.

Brad Wells's curator insight, October 21, 2014 12:35 PM

Robert X

It is so good I have nothing to say

 

AlaineS's curator insight, October 21, 2014 9:03 PM

Gives info on what it is and what effects it has. Quite helpful!

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Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds

Watch 131 Years of Global Warming in 26 Seconds | green infographics | Scoop.it

From our friends at NASA comes this amazing 26-second video, depicting how temperatures around the globe have warmed since 1880. That year is what scientists call the beginning of the “modern record.” You’ll note an acceleration of those temperatures in the late 1970s as greenhouse gas emissions from energy production increased worldwide and clean air laws reduced emissions of pollutants that had a cooling effect on the climate, and thus were masking some of the global warming signal. The data comes from NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, which monitors global surface temperatures. As NASA notes, “in this animation, reds indicate temperatures higher than the average during a baseline period of 1951-1980, while blues indicate lower temperatures than the baseline average.”

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No Politics, Just Science: A New App Explains Climate Change

No Politics, Just Science: A New App Explains Climate Change | green infographics | Scoop.it
"Climate change": At this point, does that sound more like a political buzzword than a real scientific event? Even though most scientists agree that climate change is well underway, the public's understanding of it lags behind—whether due to confusion, religion, or willful ignorance. Our country's acceptance of the phenomenon has actually retreated in the past few years.

A new, free app for iPhones and iPads called Just Science jolts us back to reality by translating the science of climate change into layperson's terms. The app takes two centuries of data from the comprehensive Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature (BEST) study, then converts it into a color-coded moving map that shows how today's monthly temperatures compare to historical averages since 1800. The result, according to developer Nick Orenstein, is a gradual, everyday reminder of what's happening to the planet.

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How Much CO2 Is Created By… | GE Data Visualization

Charging you cellphone or preparing a cup of tea: play around with this visualization to find out how much carbon is released by various activities!


Via J. Campbell
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USGBC Blog: Top 10 States for LEED Green Buildings

USGBC Blog: Top 10 States for LEED Green Buildings | green infographics | Scoop.it

Today, USGBC released its top 10 list of states with the most LEED-certified building square footage per capita. The District of Columbia leads the nation, with more than 31 square feet of LEED-certified space per person in 2011, and Colorado is the leading state, with 2.74 square feet per person in 2011. Other top states include Illinois, Virginia and Washington, with 2.69, 2.42 and 2.18 square feet of LEED-certified space per person, respectively...

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National Forest Map

National Forest Map | green infographics | Scoop.it
What areas of the United States contain the densest amount of woody biomass?

 

This map and the localized versions show the biogeography of the distinct climatic zones of the United States.  It also can show interesting human patterns.  What are some things that explain this spatial distribution? 


Via Seth Dixon
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The Top 1 Percent: What Jobs Do They Have?

The Top 1 Percent: What Jobs Do They Have? | green infographics | Scoop.it
Explore the occupations and industries of the nation's wealthiest households. (What jobs do the Top 1% hold? Insightful infographic from @NYTimes.
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Asia is the world's largest petroleum consumer

Asia is the world's largest petroleum consumer | green infographics | Scoop.it
Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S.

 

This goes nicely with the carbon footprint data that was recently posted.  Although that was data aggregated at the national level and this is on the 'world realms' level, many of the same patterns are visible without the same specificity. 


Via syarifah dalimunthe, Seth Dixon
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A Solar Company’s Amazing Infographics Are Powered By The Sun

A Solar Company’s Amazing Infographics Are Powered By The Sun | green infographics | Scoop.it
Austria Solar’s 2011 annual report ships in a foil package. Open it indoors and you’ll find a tastefully embossed cover, followed by many blank pages. The magic happens when you expose it to the sun. Watch.

It’s an elegant expression of the constant radiating power of the sun and an eye-catching way for Austria’s pre-eminent solar trade association to associate themselves with innovative thinking...

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What's In Your Trash?

What's In Your Trash? | green infographics | Scoop.it

The What’s In Your Trash infographic explores what constitutes trash in America. From Bolt Insurance, this design breaks down all of the stuff we throw away.

The cleaning services industry brings in more than $50 billion a year, from janitorial services to residential cleaning agencies, and the industry is projected to continue growing. Americans generated more than 250 tons of garbage in 2010. In BOLT’s What’s In Your Trash infographic, find out what is really in your trash and how important cleaning services and janitorial services are. Through recycling and waste incineration, as much as 90% of waste can bypass the landfill! Presented as an infographic to help you more easily visualize and retain this important information...

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INFOGRAPHIC: Googling Superfoods

INFOGRAPHIC: Googling Superfoods | green infographics | Scoop.it

Just how successful have marketers been at making us care about pomegranate, blueberry and goji? To find out, enter the world of superfruits as seen through Google search popularity.

 

Click the graphic to compare the explosion of açaí, the rise of pomegranate and the waning popularity of noni – and discover some of the key turning points...

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Asbestos Kills American Workers [Infographic]

Asbestos Kills American Workers [Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

According to the American Thoracic Society, asbestos has been the largest cause of occupational cancer in the US.

 

Mesothelioma is a rare yet deadly form of cancer, the only known cause of which is exposure to asbestos. Because of that fact, the truth is that mesothelioma is entirely preventable, and our hope is that educating the public about mesothelioma and asbestos exposure will help bring an end to this fatal disease.

Did you know that asbestos is the largest cause of occupational cancer in the United States, and that we still import tons of this lethal material? What’s more, it doesn’t take much asbestos exposure to inhale or ingest enough asbestos and start the process towards developing mesothelioma, asbestosis, or another asbestos-related disease like lung cancer. In fact, some mesothelioma patients are the wives of men who worked with asbestos, who brought the tiny, deadly fibers home on their clothing, skin, and hair. Just this limited amount of asbestos exposure was enough to lead to a mesothelioma diagnosis decades later.

 

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Super Bowl 2012 = Greenest Super Bowl Ever?

Super Bowl 2012 = Greenest Super Bowl Ever? | green infographics | Scoop.it

Sports leagues and franchises are increasingly “going green”, and the NFL is no exception. The Super Bowl 2012 (aka Super Bowl XLVI) host committee, the NFL, the Indianapolis community, and people around the country are looking to improve on the greening of the Cowboys stadium and Super Bowl XLV. Check out the various green initiatives below, and don’t forget to participate in some energy-saving measures today...

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Foot Powered (infographic)

Foot Powered (infographic) | green infographics | Scoop.it

As most of you have probably noticed, biking and walking are in. Especially in young cities, college towns and places with descent weather, you can’t go anywhere without seeing a bike or people walking. And us Austinites are lucky to be in a tri-fecta city, Austin is a young, college city with good biking and walking weather! While these trends look like a rise in biking and walking during good weather months, the Department of Transportation has noticed a rapid increase in biking and walking trips year round as have responded by increasing the budget from $16 million in 1990 to $1.3 billion in 2009...

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Chart of the Day: Africa's Greenest Cities

Chart of the Day: Africa's Greenest Cities | green infographics | Scoop.it
A graphic in the Siemens African Green City Index offers a side-by-side comparison of some key environmental factors in fifteen major African cities.

Overall, cities from the south and north perform the best. Cape Town, Durban, Johannesburg, Casablanca, Tunis and Accra all rank above average on the environmental scale. Pretoria generates the most waste. Johannesburg and Cairo consume the most water. Accra is one of the densest cities, and Tunis uses the most electricity.

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Bikes Can Save Us! [infographic]

Bikes Can Save Us! [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Today’s infographic, How Bikes Can Save Us, suggests that by switching from gas guzzling cars to fat burning bikes we can do more than help the planet, we can help ourselves. Isn’t that nice? We can be selfish while still helping out the planet that is nice enough to house even though we just shit all over it. Anyway enjoy today’s infographic and keep sharing!

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It Takes More Than Data to Make a Decision

It Takes More Than Data to Make a Decision | green infographics | Scoop.it
The Environmental Protection Agency last week launched its much-awaited database reporting on the greenhouse gas emissions of major power plants. You can go to ghgdata.epa.gov and find out how many tons of carbon dioxide, methane and other gases are being put out by facilities in your community or state.

It’s a major advance for transparency on greenhouse emissions, and analysts and activists will have a field day with the data. But will it really help the public move forward on making energy decisions?

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Survey: The American dream home is energy-efficient

Survey: The American dream home is energy-efficient | green infographics | Scoop.it

It’s not news that utilities can be budget-killers, and apparently people are getting wise to the fact that energy-efficiency means lower utility bills. A recent Yahoo survey found that energy efficiency is the one feature everyone can agree on when they imagine their “dream home” — ahead of water views, a custom build and all the other things Americans usually aspire to....

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Land use poses a critical impact on local climate change

Land use poses a critical impact on local climate change | green infographics | Scoop.it

Clearing forests, installing pavement, planting crops and other land use decisions may be among the most important factors in impacting local climate change.

These decisions impact evaporation, solar radiation and other biophysical effects that may have more impact on local climate than greenhouse gases, which have a more global climate impact.


Via Flora Moon
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