green infographics
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green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
Curated by Lauren Moss
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Climate Change Infographics: Sea Level Rise

Climate Change Infographics: Sea Level Rise | green infographics | Scoop.it
Infographics have been popping up everywhere lately. A combination of image and information (often as graphs and charts), they are a great way to present.

Over coming weeks I hope to feature infographics regarding climate change, nature and health, along with some background information about their design and use.

The first one, showing the predicted effects of sea level rise on the world’s major cities, comes from Keeping our head above water | GDS Publishing.

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The Cold, Hard Truth About Recycling Steel - Earth911.com

The Cold, Hard Truth About Recycling Steel - Earth911.com | green infographics | Scoop.it
Guide to local resources including recycling centers, how to recycle, pollution prevention and how help protect the environment.

We’ve come across quite a few creative uses of unconventional materials lately, from shipping containers made of mushrooms to bow ties made of soda cans, computer parts and pills. But when it comes to producing automobiles, large buildings and machinery, steel is still king.

According to steel building site BuildingsGuide.com, the material also has some built-in advantages when it comes to recycling.

Because steel is a metal, it can be separated from a muddled single-stream of recyclables by using magnets. It’s also considerably less finicky than plastics, according to the site, in that steel doesn’t need to be separated by color or size before it’s recycled can all be melted down at once.

And, according to the American Iron and Steel Institute, technological advances have seen the energy intensity needed to produce a ton of steel drop by 27 percent since 1990, helping in part to make steel the world’s most recycled material...

Click on the image for the complete infographic.

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GE interactive: Healthymagination Challenge

GE interactive: Healthymagination Challenge | green infographics | Scoop.it

In September 2011, GE and partners launched a $100 million open innovation challenge which sought to identify and accelerate ideas that advance breast cancer early detection and diagnostics. Explore the 500+ submissions through this interactive data visualization created with GE and see the five seed winners that were awarded $100,000 each from GE to develop their ideas.

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Carbon map infographic: a new way to see the Earth move

Carbon map infographic: a new way to see the Earth move | green infographics | Scoop.it

How can you map the world to show global data in an immediately clear way? How can you show two datasets at once to see how they compare?

Kiln, a partnership of Guardian writer Duncan Clark and developer Robin Houston has come up with this beautiful new take on the globe. Watch the animated intro or click on the topics and see the map move before your eyes. Adding shading lets you compare two datasets to see how they relate – so you can see clearly how poorest countries have the fastest growing populations but the lowest emissions...

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Tracking Energy Consumption For Each Building in NYC

Tracking Energy Consumption For Each Building in NYC | green infographics | Scoop.it
Just how much does energy does that building across the way use?

Unless a buildings lights are on all night, every night, it’s probably hard to see just how much it consumes. For the lucky residents of the Big Apple, however, a new and fascinating map has appeared on the web to help solve the mystery. From the Flat Iron building to individual buildings in Crown Heights, the map takes an astoundingly detailed look at each and every block in the five boroughs, giving it an energy consumption estimate. Not surprisingly, the gleaming Manhattan skyline easily tops the list as the biggest energy hog...

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Eco-Housing 101 [infographic]

Eco-Housing 101 [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it
The tips range from basic knowledge, such as turning off the water when you brush your teeth, to insulation tips that can put more than a few pennies back into your wallet.
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The Political Geography of Gasoline Prices

The Political Geography of Gasoline Prices | green infographics | Scoop.it
Rising gas prices make people unhappy, but the pain is felt most acutely in states where it is unlikely to make an electoral difference.

 

There are numerous geographic themes that make this article a worthwhile read.  The evidence suggests that states the vote more solidly Republican are being hit hardest at the pump.  Gasoline expenditures as a share of personal income are higher in pro-Republican states than pro-Democrat states.  Understanding the demographic base of each party as well as population density explains much of this issue: states that are very rural drive greater distances with less public transit option, spending more per capita on gasoline.  Also, since the most affluent urban centers are Democrat-leaning, they spend a less sizeable portion of their income on gasoline.  This article would be a nice resource for a classroom/small group discussion.  


Via Seth Dixon
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Siobhan Chantigian's curator insight, April 23, 2014 11:39 PM

This is an interesting article about how rising gas prices and how people are going to vote.  

Annie Christofferson's comment, April 27, 2014 6:06 PM
I thought this it was interesting how it said that the states that it really makes a difference in are the ones that don't have as big an impact on the electoral college. It doesn't seem quite fair.
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Water Footprint of an American | The Nature Conservancy

Water Footprint of an American | The Nature Conservancy | green infographics | Scoop.it

The “water footprint” of the average American is 32,911 glasses per day. That’s according to a recent study by a Conservancy partner organization, the Water Footprint Network.

No wonder another recent report co-authored by Conservancy scientist Brian Richter has found that water scarcity affects about 2.7 billion people for at least one month each year.

Where is all this water? It’s used to produce the food we eat, clothes we wear and more. And where does it come from? Nature. In fact, about 70 percent of the water extracted from rivers, lakes and aquifers is for agriculture.

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Evalis Palomares's curator insight, September 1, 2015 1:57 AM

Water conservancy is a big deal especially right now in California. 70% of our water being extracted from rivers, aquifers, etc are being imported for the use of our agriculture because it drives our economy. Our chaparral environment makes it great for growing crops. Cities like Oxnard, CA are home to the greatest strawberries in the world. Despite the fact that our water levels are decreasing because of the drought, our agriculture water intake remains the same. New methods need to be implicated for the benefit of conserving water. Methods such as recycling water is a definite option but requires money, and unfortunately our priorities are mainly set on medicare, social security, and defense. I believe people are yet to be educated about the amount of water going down the drain not being utilized. I believe in the information coming from the source because it traces back to The Nature Conservancy organization, thus being credible. The structure of this article is very straight forward. Mainly highlighting factual information on the subject, what we can do, and including outside resources. I do find that there isn't as much commentary as I would like to have present in the initial article. 

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By 2050, 70% Of The World’s Population Will Be Urban. Is That A Good Thing?

By 2050, 70% Of The World’s Population Will Be Urban. Is That A Good Thing? | green infographics | Scoop.it
Last year, the world’s population reached 7 billion people. Because of our continually accelerating population growth, we keep hearing that more and more people will end up living in cities (and mega cities).

But what’s that really look like? How will the world change?

Unicef, with the help of design studio Periscopic, released “An Urban World” to answer these questions. It’s an interactive, HTML5 visualization of the world from the years 1950-2050. But rather than showing our geographic boundaries, every country* is depicted only by their population living in urban environments...

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New Infographic- GMOs -- We Have a Right to Know!

New Infographic- GMOs -- We Have a Right to Know! | green infographics | Scoop.it
Do you believe we have a right to know how our food is produced? Check out the new infographic about genetically engineered foods from the Just Label It campaign and see why over 900,000 Americans have contacted the FDA.
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Students’ Environmental Impact Infographic

Students’ Environmental Impact Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

A marketing campaign for online higher learning courses, this infographic attempts to demonstrate students’ environmental impact both in terms of the amount of paper they use and the fuel required to travel to classes. The facts may be true, but can’t help thinking students aren’t really the ones to blame for damaging the environment...

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1Bog Infographic: How Much Does Solar Cost?

1Bog Infographic: How Much Does Solar Cost? | green infographics | Scoop.it

A growing number of homeowners want to know how much solar costs, but it can sometimes be difficult to get a straight answer. To help shine a light, we took the results of over 45,000 solar estimates created by real U.S. homeowners in 2011 and put them into these maps. See below how homeowners used One Block Off the Grid’s online estimate tool to generate these results. Energy analytics powered by Clean Power Research.

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Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining | The White House

Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining | The White House | green infographics | Scoop.it
America's dependence on foreign oil is declining, but we have to do more to bring down the price of gas, and there's no short-term solution.

In 2010, we imported less than 50 percent of the oil our nation consumed—the first time that’s happened in 13 years—and the trend continued in 2011.

We’re relying less on imported oil for a number of reasons, not least that production is up here in the United States. In fact, America is producing more oil today than at any time in the last eight years. As part of his strategy to increase safe, responsible oil production in the United States, President Obama has opened millions of new acres for oil and gas exploration and we now have more working oil and gas rigs than the rest of the world—combined...

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Water Infographics

Water Infographics | green infographics | Scoop.it
Water is one of the most basic needs, and a good portion of our planet is already experiencing a major shortage of water that is safe to drink.

Here are some well-illustrated infographics about H2O. Our first two infographics of the day come from GOOD, who partnered with Levis last year and rolled out a whole line of water-themed infographics. The first appeals to the humanitarian in you, while the second appeals to your checkbook. Save water, save lives and money...

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How Much Does Solar Cost in Your State?

How Much Does Solar Cost in Your State? | green infographics | Scoop.it

Solar is a great way to get yourself free from the power grid and take control of your own energy generation, while also helping to drastically lower your impact on the environment. Solar panels last a long time too, once you’ve installed them, they often provide reliable power for well over 20 years, silently generating electricity with little to no maintenance. Sounds great! So why are people slow to implement this fantastic technology?

The initial cost of solar is sometimes prohibitive for families, especially if their energy needs are high. This graphic uses over 45,000 results from their online solar cost estimation tool to show what you can expect, on average, in your state.
The graphic explores four points: how much solar costs in your state, what you could save every month, what you could save over time, how long your solar setup will take to pay for itself. Not surprisingly, sunny states like California tend to have some of the lowest prices on solar, while also providing some of the highest savings over time. However, that doesn’t mean northerns states can’t make financial sense: New York state provides such good incentives on solar purchases, you can actually pay off your system faster there than in California...

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Tips for a Green Home & Yard (Infographic)

Tips for a Green Home & Yard (Infographic) | green infographics | Scoop.it

Tips for a green home and yard: protect your home and local waterways...

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What is the cost of climate change to our oceans?

What is the cost of climate change to our oceans? | green infographics | Scoop.it
A study claims to show how climate change could cost the marine economy trillions of dollars per year, but how can you cost the oceans?

Scientists in Sweden claim climate change could cause almost $2tn of damage per year through marine impacts alone by 2100 if emissions continue to rise at current rates.

Valuing the Ocean, a study by the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) is due to be published in June this year and has assigned monetary values to five categories of ocean services in a bid to establish an objective calculation for the costs of climate change to the marine economy.

The study uses one high- and one low-emissions scenario as defined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to show how quick and concerted efforts to minimise global warming could lead to savings of $1.37tn per year - or 0.25% or projected global GDP - by 2100...

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Density Design’s Dust Platform

Density Design’s Dust Platform | green infographics | Scoop.it

Dust is an ongoing research project developed for Iridescent Learning, an American NGO. The project’s aim is to provide a freely available, web based information visualization tool that supports parents in exploring and comparing the educational offerings (from Pre-K to High School) from selected major cities in the United States, currently: New York, Los Angeles, and the San Francisco Bay Area. By leveraging a step-by-step decision making process, Dust helps to evaluate and compare school profiles based on multidimensional data-sets composed of general information (e.g., enrollment, class size, number of teachers), school performances (e.g., subjects score and proficiency, attendance), and urban mobility (e.g., location, distances, transportation). Supported by geographical maps and close-up visualizations users can create custom profiles based on their needs and priorities and then perform a search for the most appropriate schools for their children. Dust aims to combine the capability of information visualization in depicting synthetic views of complex, multidimensional, and georeferenced data; with a rich, yet intuitive, web-user experience. The project aims to move away from a “by experts, for experts” design paradigm to a schools comparison information visualization “for the people” -providing real impact on their daily life, and future prospects, through improved choices.

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Sponsored Infographic: Saving Water with Style

Sponsored Infographic: Saving Water with Style | green infographics | Scoop.it

Levi's has created a line of jeans which requires significantly less water to make.

As the first apparel company to require manufacturers to protect water quality and restrict the use of harmful chemicals, Levi's has helped ensure that water leaving its factories is cleaner than the water that comes in.

Continuing with their commitment to water consciousness, Levi's has created Water<less jeans, which requires significantly less water during the manufacturing process. Click on the infographic to learn more about how the company did it...

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Infographic: Waste Management Trends

Infographic: Waste Management Trends | green infographics | Scoop.it

Here’s a great visualization outlining some trends in waste management.
The infographic below hints toward several trends in the industry: a rising need for home cleaning services, an increase in recycling, and how the percentage of recycling can increase or reduce pressure on industry margins.
For example, according to the data below, only 1 in 2 aluminum cans are recycled. This pressures aluminum suppliers to mine for more, and keeps demand for aluminum high. If recycling rates increase, prices may lower. Similarly, if recycling efforts increase, it will affect profits of management companies that handle waste.
If you’re interested in learning more about the waste management industry, we list the 20 largest companies (trading on the U.S. exchanges) below. If you wish to analyze any of the names further, you can click on the stock icons and links to access free tools on Kapitall.com.

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Label GMOs: Infographic

Label GMOs: Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

One of my biggest problems with genetically engineered foods is that biotech companies love to talk about how superior their GM foods are, yet they resist any push to label foods that contain GMOs. Seems a little bit fishy to me!
We’re seeing a bit of progress on the GMO food labels front, thanks in no small part to campaigns like Just Label It. Last week, Civil Eats released an infographic laying out why genetically modified foods should have labels on them, and the reasons are compelling. For me, it’s all about choice. As consumers, we have a right to know what we’re putting into our bodies and what we are feeding our children and our pets. If GM foods are so safe, what’s the problem with labeling them?

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Storm Surge Interactive Map Shows What Parts of NYC Could be Affected by Rising Sea Levels

Storm Surge Interactive Map Shows What Parts of NYC Could be Affected by Rising Sea Levels | green infographics | Scoop.it
Climate Central's new Storm Surge interactive map helps New Yorkers see if their neighborhoods could be flooded by rising sea levels.

Although the city has committed to investing in a system to deter an abundance of stormwater overflow, flooding is still a major concern for New York City. The New Jersey non-profit, Climate Central, has created an interactive map that illustrates to New Yorkers just how global warming and flooding could affect the city by as early as 2020. Called Surging Seas, the map allows visitors to type in their zip codes and see projected flooding risks over time...

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Using the web and data to create competition for green buildings

Using the web and data to create competition for green buildings | green infographics | Scoop.it

The combo of competition, the web and data could be the key to getting more green building technologies, like LED lighting and solar rooftop panels, deployed, according to a new startup called Honest Buildings.

The six-month-old company, which plans to officially launch later this month, has created a site that aggregates building and energy info from sources like building owners, green building technology service providers and public databases to create a go-to site that is supposed to create both transparency and an ecosystem around green building technology...

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US Carbon Footprint Dominates…Because of Spam

US Carbon Footprint Dominates…Because of Spam | green infographics | Scoop.it
In the world of environmental pollution there are three big players; the US, India, and China. Currently leading the race...the U.S. And it may be for a reason that you have never thought of.

It’s been a known fact that the U.S. has dominated the tech industry for some time, and while they have brought many inspirational innovations to protect our environment and advance our efficiency, the technology sector could be responsible for our large carbon footprint caused by spam emails...

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Infographic: Take the Fast Lane to Electric Vehicles

Infographic: Take the Fast Lane to Electric Vehicles | green infographics | Scoop.it
Ready to switch from pump to plug? CODA's all-electric sedan is showing what the road ahead looks like.

Los Angeles-based car manufacturer CODA has been working to redefine what an electric vehicle can be. In addition to environmental and cost-saving benefits, its all-electric sedan features a range of up to 125 miles per charge and speedy acceleration.

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