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Imagining A Future City Filled With Driverless Cars And Without Any Parking Spaces

Imagining A Future City Filled With Driverless Cars And Without Any Parking Spaces | green infographics | Scoop.it

As self-driving cars move from fantasy to reality, what kind of effect will they have on cities?

A research and urban prototyping project called Shuffle City investigates, and in the process, becomes a manifesto for a new kind of modern city--one that depends less on traditional public transportation like buses or light rail and more on creating a fleet of continuously moving automated vehicles to serve urban mobility needs.

Shuffle City looks at the new possibilities that could arise from cities transitioning to cars without drivers. If cars were put into some constant flow as a public good, and if people didn’t all have their own vehicles, there would be no need for the concrete wastelands and lifeless towers that serve as a parking infrastructure in the urban landscapes of car-centric cities like Phoenix and Los Angeles (Under the current ownership model, the average car spends 21 hours per day parked.)

The share of city space ruled by parking lots will shrink, making way for more green space, environmental buffers, workspace, housing, retail, and denser planning for more walkable cities...

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José Antônio Carlos - O Professor Pepe's curator insight, August 7, 2013 5:41 AM

Um desenho da cidade de nossos sonhos. Carros sem motoristas, ruas sem espaço para estacionamento, e por aí vai.

Kim Spence-Jones's curator insight, August 7, 2013 11:53 PM

Interface between cars and homes is an interesting area of R&D. Everything from entertainment synchronising to battery management.

miguel sa's curator insight, September 4, 2013 1:17 PM

Jacque Fresco has been talking about this sort of thing for awhile now, looks like its coming closer to reality~ 

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Cities Leading the Way in Solar Energy [infographic]

Cities Leading the Way in Solar Energy [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it
Since 2002, the U.S. has increased its installed solar photovolatic capacity by a factor of 200. Which cities are leading the way?

The U.S. now has more than 200 times the amount of installed solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity than it did in 2002, according to a new report from Environment America, and the top 20 cities for this capacity contain more solar power today than the amount installed for the total country six years ago. "Shining Cities: At the Forefront of America's Solar Energy Revolution" looks at which metropolises were in the lead of PV capacity in 2013, and what cities top the country when it comes to capacity per capita. The top cities may not necessarily be the locales you expect, but this data may highlight potential markets that are hot for building PV installations.

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Solar Power Is A Huge Water Saver (World Water Day Infographic)

Solar Power Is A Huge Water Saver (World Water Day Infographic) | green infographics | Scoop.it

Every year since 1993, the community of nations has focused on the importance of fresh water and advocated for the sustainable management of freshwater resources. Severe droughts experienced recently in places like the American West, the Horn of Africa, Russia, China, and Australia have highlighted the fact that humans are rapidly using up the world's water supplies—and when they’re gone, they’re gone. We are spending one of our most vital resources in greater volumes every day.

One Block Off The Grid recently developed an infographic to illustrate how energy production depends on water. It shows water use by four of the most common energy sources: coal, nuclear, oil and gas, and solar. Solar comes out on top big time.

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Mercury Rising: Protecting the Health of Humans, Waterways and Fish [infographic]

Mercury Rising: Protecting the Health of Humans, Waterways and Fish [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

The news is abuzz with reports of mercury-contaminated fish traversing our waters, and www.fix.com has created an infographic entitled “Mercury Rising: Enjoy Fish Without the Risk” explaining the dangers of mercury, who it affects, and how to avoid consuming this neurotoxin. Mercury is found naturally in our environment, however, in high concentrations, it can be dangerous. Unfortunately, due to contaminated emissions from businesses such as power plants, cement plants, and chemical manufacturers, over 18 million acres of lakes, wetlands, and estuaries are now contaminated by mercury. Additionally, over 1.2 million river miles have also been contaminated, and those numbers are rising every year.

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Forests & Big Data: 5 Deforestation Hotspots Flying Under the Radar

Forests & Big Data: 5 Deforestation Hotspots Flying Under the Radar | green infographics | Scoop.it

We are still losing forests and trees much faster than they can regrow. In fact, we are losing 50 soccer fields worth of trees every minute!

Many are working to reverse tree cover loss in the world’s largest remaining forests: the Amazon Basin, Congo Basin, tropical forests of Indonesia and the vast boreal forests of Russia and Canada. These are worthy goals, considering that just two countries—Brazil and Indonesia—still account for about half of all tropical forest loss.

But several hugely important deforestation hotspots are still flying under the radar. These forest areas don’t get the headlines or resources of the major tropical regions, but are seeing alarming trends or have lost much of their tree cover already.


Visit the link for more the latest data from Global Forest Watch, an online forest monitoring and alert system.

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Near-real-time monitoring: Global Forest Watch

Near-real-time monitoring: Global Forest Watch | green infographics | Scoop.it

Global Forest Watch uses satellite imagery and other technologies to estimate forest usage, change, and tree cover (among other things). These estimates and their eventual actions used to be slow. Now they're near-real-time.

The online forest monitoring system created by the World Resources Institute, Google and a group of more than 40 partners uses technologies including Google Earth Engine and Google Maps Engine to map the world’s forests with satellite imagery, detect changes in forest cover in near-real-time, and make this information freely available to anyone with Internet access.

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Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, March 18, 7:18 AM

When reality is worst than fiction!

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Infographic - 10 Interesting Facts about Solar Energy

Infographic - 10 Interesting Facts about Solar Energy | green infographics | Scoop.it

We find the below infographic to be very interesting, as it highlights facts about solar energy which we did not know.  From Google to Space Missions and from flooring to a roadway, check out the interesting facts and amaze your friends with your knowledge.

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3 tips for companies to reduce carbon in their supply chains [infographic]

3 tips for companies to reduce carbon in their supply chains  [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Cutting carbon is not just about reducing emissions. The bulk of the problem lies along the supply chain, which should be meaningfully engaged.

The corporate sector is facing some stark and irrefutable truths regarding climate change.

First, at over 400 parts per million, atmospheric carbon is skyrocketing. If large companies are going to achieve their carbon reduction targets, it's imperative that they engage their supply base.

Visit the link for three top tips on how to kick-off doing so.

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Infographic: What is Light Pollution?

Infographic: What is Light Pollution? | green infographics | Scoop.it

Light pollution refers to the various ways in which artificial light can negatively impact our natural environment. The four most common categories of light pollution are urban glow, glare, light clutter, and light trespass.

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This Is What Informal Transit Looks Like When You Actually Map It

This Is What Informal Transit Looks Like When You Actually Map It | green infographics | Scoop.it
An experiment from Nairobi with implications for the urbanizing world.

As transit systems go, the "matatus" in Nairobi exist somewhere between underground gypsy cabs and MTA bus service. The minibuses themselves aren't owned by any government agency. The fares aren't regulated by the city. The routes are vaguely based on a bus network that existed in Nairobi some 30 years ago, but they've since shifted and multiplied and expanded.

Not surprisingly, many passengers on board know little about them, either. Riders who navigate the matatu system rely on it in parts, using only the lines they know and the unofficial stops they're sure actually exist. As for the network as a whole – there's never even been a map of it...

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Passive Houses: 13 Reasons Why the Future Will Be Dominated by this New Pioneering Trend

Passive Houses: 13 Reasons Why the Future Will Be Dominated by this New Pioneering Trend | green infographics | Scoop.it

Passive Houses are essentially buildings which use very little energy for heating and cooling, whilst also providing a high level of comfort. 

The houses are so energy efficient they can save up to 90% in heating costs. One of the main focal points of Passive Houses is minimizing air leakage from the property. In fact, for a house to be certified, ‘the building must not leak more air than 0.6 times the house volume per hour’. The houses implement the latest in insulation technology, triple-glazed windows, balanced energy recovery ventilation and limiting thermal bridging, being heated mostly using ‘passive’ energy from electrical equipment, people and passive solar gains...

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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, February 1, 10:13 AM

A quick primer for those who have never thought about passive management of energy via building design.

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25% Of Sharks And Rays Face Alarming Threat Of Extinction: Study + Infographic

25% Of Sharks And Rays Face Alarming Threat Of Extinction: Study + Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

A staggering percentage of the world's sharks and rays are now "alarmingly" close to the brink of extinction, according to the a new study spearheaded by the Shark Specialist Group of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). The study -- said to be first global analysis of the conservation status of 1,041 shark, ray and related species -- found that at least one in every four existing species of sharks and rays may soon be wiped off the face of the planet. The shrinking numbers are largely due to overfishing, the researchers said.

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Google Highlights Global Deforestation with Interactive Map

Google Highlights Global Deforestation with Interactive Map | green infographics | Scoop.it

Google earth has partnered with a research team at the University of Maryland in the realization of an interactive, digital map that highlights global deforestation.

The data used has been compiled from the results of a decade long analysis of 654,178 landsat images. each color indication on the interface corresponds to collected informational evidence: red -- forest loss from 2000-2012; blue -- forest gain from 2000-2012; magenta -- both loss and gain; green -- forest extent.

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, January 15, 5:28 AM

Will we be in time to turn around the amount of deforestation on the earth to stop the destruction?

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United States Carbon Emissions: An Interactive Heat Map & New Research

United States Carbon Emissions: An Interactive Heat Map & New Research | green infographics | Scoop.it

When it comes to carbon emissions, don’t blame big cities -- blame the suburbs, says a new study from the University of California, Berkeley. The study, released Monday, found that population-dense cities contribute less greenhouse-gas emissions per person than other areas of the United States. However, these cities’ suburbs are so damaging to the environment that they effectively wipe out any climate benefits. The study will be published in science journal Environmental Science & Technology.


Using dozens of variables, researchers found that greenhouse-gas emissions -- largely from cars, trucks and other vehicles -- in the suburbs account for about 50 percent of all household emissions in the nation, even though less than 50 percent of the population lives in these areas.

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INFOGRAPHIC: How Green Cities Can Help Sustain the Future

INFOGRAPHIC: How Green Cities Can Help Sustain the Future | green infographics | Scoop.it

People around the world are moving to urban areas in record numbers – and for the first time ever there’s more people living in cities than in rural areas. This trend is only set to accelerate, so it’s high time to develop solutions to make our cities more sustainable. CityTownInfo just launched a new infographic that shows how greener cities can pave the way to a sustainable future – check it out after the break.

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Norm Miller's curator insight, April 15, 10:24 AM

Mixed use and density does lower resources per capita.  But this is the first estimate I've seen.

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Clean Energy Trends 2014: New Solar Energy Capacity Exceeds Wind For First Time

Clean Energy Trends 2014: New Solar Energy Capacity Exceeds Wind For First Time | green infographics | Scoop.it

Clean Edge's latest report on the global energy market shines a spotlight on five key clean energy trends likely to shape future.

The landscape of the global renewable energy market continues to shift with changes in economic and social conditions and policies. While some renewable energy sectors – notably, solar photovoltaic (PV) deployment – experienced “dazzling growth, success and rising stock prices,” others saw a drop in deployments, as well as challenges on the policy and finance fronts, according to a global clean energy market report from Clean Edge, released March 26.


More details and data at the link.

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A Map of History's Biggest Greenhouse Gas Polluters

A Map of History's Biggest Greenhouse Gas Polluters | green infographics | Scoop.it

A select few countries have been responsible for the majority of the world's CO2 emissions since the '70s.

To know the biggest CO2 spewers in recent history, have a look at these animated maps from the Paris-based data designer "JeremY Boy." They show the countries responsible for the bulk of emissions since 1971, with pulsating, foul-looking clouds each representing 300 million tonnes of C02. Note that some countries are left blank due to missing or incomplete information (certain governments don't accurately track bunker fuels, for instance), and that the data refers only to emissions from burning fossil fuels, not smaller sources like incinerating waste materials.

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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, March 29, 6:34 AM

But while emissions are a global problem, the blame for producing them is not. A few countries have been disproportionately responsible for clouding the air with climate-bending gases. And though they may have cleaned up their act in recent years, significant damage has already been done.

 
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9 Charts That Tell You Where Life Is Pretty Terrific

9 Charts That Tell You Where Life Is Pretty Terrific | green infographics | Scoop.it

The Paris-based think tank known as the OECD is just out with its semi-annual survey of how different economies stack up in terms of social well-being. (Well-being is basically the polite way economists talk about happiness.) The organization even has a new data visualization to let you see where your country ranks in certain key measures.

Called "Society at a Glance," the report is well worth a read. But here are some of the most interesting bits of data we found, in no particular order.

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Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, March 20, 8:47 AM

Un análisis de datos a la VENA!

Russell Roberts's curator insight, March 22, 8:20 AM

Thanks to reporter Matt Phillips of "The Atlantic Cities" website for this revealing set of bar graphs. The data were compiled by the French think tank "OECD" and showed where nations placed on the "social well being" or happiness scale.  The United States didn't do well in a number of areas...perhaps this is something our political leadership should study before they pass legislation that costs us much but delivers so little.    Aloha, Russ.

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How Can You Reduce Your Water Footprint?

How Can You Reduce Your Water Footprint? | green infographics | Scoop.it

How much water do you use every day?  The answer might surprise you

A paper released online last week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concluded that Americans significantly underestimate their water use.

Curious how my friends and family would fare, I reached out via social media and posed the simple question, “how much water do you use each day?”  The results in my quick survey ranged to from 2 gallons to 300 gallons, but the most common estimate was 10 to 15 gallons per day.  In reality, Americans use closer to 90 gallons of water a day.  To put things in perspective, a 10-minute shower with an EPA WaterSense labeled high efficiency showerhead consumes 22 gallons, while a 20 minute shower with an older, high flow showerhead could be as much as 100 gallons.  Last month, Governor Brown declared a state of emergency and called on all Californians to conserve water in every way possible. 

Knowing how much water you use, and how and where you use it, are important first steps in determining the most effective ways you can save water in your home and business.

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 12, 4:43 PM

Water, water, everywhere but not a drop to waste.

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All of Earth's land mammals by total weight in one graph

All of Earth's land mammals by total weight in one graph | green infographics | Scoop.it

Randall Munroe, a former NASA roboticist who nows draws clever geeky webcomics at XKCD, used data from Vaclav Smil's The Earth's Biosphere: Evolution, Dynamics, and Change ("plus a few other sources") to create a visualization of all of Earth's land mammals, which include us, by weight. It does certainly put things in perspective, especially when you compare wild land mammals to us and our livestock and pets.

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Google's Next Goal: To Stop Deforestation with Global Forest Watch

Google's Next Goal: To Stop Deforestation with Global Forest Watch | green infographics | Scoop.it

Deforestation has long been cited as a problem, but a lack of accessible data meant that the general public had to take someone's word for the figures. As a result, its threat always seemed more abstract and nebulous than, say, climate change or rising sea levels.


Until now: Google has unveiled its Global Forest Watch, an online tool that monitors deforestation around the world in near-real time.

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Antonio Lopez's curator insight, February 28, 3:05 AM

One role of media should be to act like those speed monitors we see that tell us how fast we are going. Hopefully a program like Google's Global Forest Watch can help us monitor deforestation in real time.

thinking peasant's curator insight, February 28, 3:51 AM

maybe they have not gone over to the dark side for good?

Daniel LaLiberte's comment, March 10, 8:59 AM
Another writeup at: http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-26287137
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How Weather Forecasts Can Help Optimize Energy Usage

How Weather Forecasts Can Help Optimize Energy Usage | green infographics | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have been exploring how using public weather forecast information can help deliver significant reductions in energy consumption.


Combining information from the Bureau of Meteorology with data from existing building management systems, the researchers have developed an intelligent model that remains one step ahead of the building’s temperature changes, automatically adjusting the heating and cooling supply accordingly.

Early experimental results have provided encouraging results, with at least 10 per cent energy savings shown to be possible.

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All the Rivers in the U.S. on a Single Interactive Map

All the Rivers in the U.S. on a Single Interactive Map | green infographics | Scoop.it

A recent report by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency concluded that 55 percent of U.S. rivers and streams are in poor condition. Many of us might not realize just how many rivers and streams there are in the United States.

This map gives you an idea of how many there are; visit the link to see many beautiful different visualizations of rivers in the U.S., as well as an interactive map that you can play with and zoom in and out of to see the rivers in your area.

All river data comes from the NHDPlus dataset, a geo-spatial, hydrologic framework dataset envisioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

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Ad Agency Designs And Makes Brochures Without Using Electricity

Ad Agency Designs And Makes Brochures Without Using Electricity | green infographics | Scoop.it

The Leo Burnett agency in Lisbon was commissioned to create a brochure for the EDP Group’s Access to Energy (A2E) campaign, which aims to bring electricity to communities in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Amazon.
This campaign also sought to show that many developed countries waste electricity, so the creative team challenged themselves by designing a brochure without using any energy.
Paper was made, pressed and dried, and the two colors of the brochure were printed manually on the paper. The last step was perhaps the easiest—folding these brochures by hand.


Even the process was documented without electricity—film cameras were used, and the amount of effort put in can be seen in the video at the link.

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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, January 30, 7:37 AM

Cool demo, but the future is clearly not abandon electricity.  The pollution associated with the film camera world has a host of problems as well (mercury, etc.).  But I like the idea here and the notion of being able to do things outside of the widely accepted standards of production.

ramiro alonso's curator insight, February 4, 4:20 AM

Una campaña para una empresa de electrificación realizada sin electricidad.

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A Map of the Top 50 Markets for Efficient Lightbulb Sales Across the U.S.

A Map of the Top 50 Markets for Efficient Lightbulb Sales Across the U.S. | green infographics | Scoop.it
Since January 1st, 2014, there's been a renewed interest in energy-efficient lighting thanks to a law that requires a minimum level of efficiency from lightbulbs, making the century-old incandescents a thing of the past.

There's still about 70% of light sockets in the US that contain energy-inefficient lightbulbs, so the potential gains are huge. And with long-lived and very efficient LEDs dropping in price quickly, there's no excuses to stick with antiquated technology.

This map was compiled based on sales data from the biggest lightbulb seller in the US, combining sales numbers for a per capita look at which areas of the country are the top adopters of LED and compact fluorescent (CFL) bulbs.

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Infographic: How Metro Compares To Other U.S. Transit Systems

Infographic: How Metro Compares To Other U.S. Transit Systems | green infographics | Scoop.it

From the University of North Carolina's School of Government comes this infographic that compares Metro against four other transit systems in major U.S. cities. There's even a comparison of complaints, with D.C.'s three being unreliable service, weekend track work and wait times, and faulty escalators. 

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