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Watch 62 Years of Global Warming in 13 Seconds

Watch 62 Years of Global Warming in 13 Seconds | green infographics | Scoop.it

An amazing 13-second NASA animation depicting how the globe has warmed during the period of 1950 to 2012.


From our friends at NASA comes this amazing 13-second animation that depicts how temperatures around the globe have warmed since 1950. You’ll note an acceleration of the temperature trend in the late 1970s as greenhouse gas emissions from energy production increased worldwide and clean air laws reduced emissions of pollutants that had a cooling effect on the climate, and thus were masking some of the global warming signal.


The data come from NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York (GISS), which monitors global surface temperatures. As NASA notes, “All 10 of the warmest years in the GISS analysis have occurred since 1998, continuing a trend of temperatures well above the mid-20th century average.

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Diedert Debusscher's curator insight, January 28, 2013 4:25 AM

Why we should care about global warming. And keep working on solutions (they exist).

Mercor's curator insight, January 31, 2013 9:55 AM

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The Geography of Well-Being

The Geography of Well-Being | green infographics | Scoop.it

Economic growth has long been the basic metric through which we evaluate economic and social progress. But a growing number of policymakers and experts argue that we need a better way to measure “well being.”

In a recent report, the Social Science Research Council’s Measure of America project takes a crack at it with their own metric. Inspired by the UN’s influential Human Development Index for nations, their American Human Development Index develops measures of well-being for America’s 435 congressional districts (plus Washington, D.C.). This allows us to see how patterns of uneven and unequal socio-economic well-being exist not just between but within many of America’s largest metros...

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    Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, April 25, 7:41 AM

    The overall index is based on three key dimensions of well-being:

    A long and healthy life, as measured by life expectancy at birth.Access to knowledge, based on school enrollment for people ages 3 to 24 (weighted one third) and educational degree attainment for those 25 and older (weighted two-thirds).Standard of living, based on median earnings for full- and part-time workers 16 and older.
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    By 2050, the Greenest City May Not Be in the First World

    By 2050, the Greenest City May Not Be in the First World | green infographics | Scoop.it
    Cities might be burning three times more energy in 2050 than they did in 2005—unless they act now.

    Currently, more than half of the world’s people live in cities. Given the trend of jobs returning to urban centers, it may not be surprising that by 2030 the world’s cities will be home to 60 percent of the world’s population. Cities are adapting to accommodate the growing population by becoming sustainable and green.

    Yet assuming that the current rapid pace of population growth continues, cities will be burning three times more energy per capita in 2050 than they did in 2005 despite their “green” efforts. Even with increasing favor toward public transport in the first world’s largest cities, the cities with the greatest opportunity to reduce energy use are those in the still-developing second world, particularly in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.

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    Tracking the World's Nuclear Arsenals: Infographic

    Tracking the World's Nuclear Arsenals: Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

    Since 1945, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists has been tracking nuclear arsenals around the world. Although the group has always made its running tallies available in print, web readers now have an interactive way of visualizing the planet's nuclear stockpiles.

    According to the Nuclear Notebook, there are currently 10,144 nuclear warheads stockpiled around the globe- enough to nearly irradiate the total land mass of the planet.

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    The Cost of Sprawl: A Visual Comparison

    The Cost of Sprawl: A Visual Comparison | green infographics | Scoop.it

    The cost of sprawl is 2.5 times more expensive than the compact city.

    Sidewalks, water and wastewater pipes, schools and libraries, police and fire protection, and of course, roads. And whether the costs are paid by the homeowner, the local government, or businesses, the lower density in the suburbs leads to higher costs to operate, maintain and replace all these services...

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    Cluster Eco-Habitat's curator insight, March 10, 3:33 AM

    L'étalement urbain, une de nos spécialités en Poitou-Charentes a un surcoût concernant les services et bien sûr environnemental.

    Bonne illustration de cela

    Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, March 10, 10:12 AM

         Sprawl is the spread of development over the landscape. For suburban areas it's going to be more expensive than urban areas. Sprawl in suburban areas would overall take more time in making it more as an urban area. Making urban areas more industrial is going to be a lot easier especially since the area has already been industrialized. 

    I.C.

    Eben Lenderking's curator insight, March 11, 8:22 AM

    Pile 'em high

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    Monitoring Marine Ecosystems: Ocean Acidification and New Efforts in Real Time Assessment

    Monitoring Marine Ecosystems: Ocean Acidification and New Efforts in Real Time Assessment | green infographics | Scoop.it
    Scientists have developed a satellite technique to capture a near real-time view of ocean acidification.

    Their findings, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, showing how data from satellites that measure salinity and other ocean conditions could be combined to produce a new way of monitoring acidification.

    Oceans are taking in about 90 percent of the excess heat created by human greenhouse gas emissions, but they’re also absorbing some of the carbon dioxide (CO2) itself. 

    A set of chemical processes dissolves that CO2 and turns it into carbonic acid and sets off a complex changes to the chemistry of seawater, which dissolves shells and coral and creates a cascade effect that could disrupt entire marine ecosystems.

    A recent study estimated $1 trillion annually in losses caused by ocean acidification by 2100, if left unmitigated. Some research has looked at “designer” corals and other creatures that could survive more acidic seas but more work needs to be done to figure out just what will thrive (or at least survive) the changing acidity...

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    Eight million tons: Researchers calculate the magnitude of plastic waste going into the ocean

    Eight million tons: Researchers calculate the magnitude of plastic waste going into the ocean | green infographics | Scoop.it
    A plastic grocery bag cartwheels down the beach until a gust of wind spins it into the ocean.

    Via SustainOurEarth, jean-luc scherer, massimo facchinetti
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    Gordon McGlone's curator insight, February 18, 12:59 AM

    The Anthropocene comes plastic wrapped.

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    Infographic: The Cost Of Living Around The World

    Infographic: The Cost Of Living Around The World | green infographics | Scoop.it

    Using data collected from Numbeo—the “world’s largest database of user contributed data about cities and countries worldwide”—web resource Movehub has created an infographic that points out the cost of living in different countries around the world. 

    According to Movehub, the Consumer Price Index (CPI) was used to determine the living costs in the countries, which takes into account the prices for groceries, transportation, restaurants and utilities. 

    Switzerland, Norway, Venezuela and Iceland have been identified as countries with the highest living cost, while India, Nepal, Pakistan and Tunisia have the lowest cost of living. 

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    Flowing Maps Explore the City's Impact on the Local Environment

    Flowing Maps Explore the City's Impact on the Local Environment | green infographics | Scoop.it

    Digital artist and illustrator Istvan has created a series of maps which artfully imagine the affect of cities and their human inhabitants on the local environment. His colorful images aren’t scientific in nature, but rather a personal exploration of what it might look like if the energies of the metropolis flowed out of the city itself.

    “I wanted to represent the influence of cities on their environment as a kind of invisible fluid that overflows from the city to its surrounding.”

    The flow of each city map was digitally rendered using local terrain to simulate the erosion flow Istvan desired, then reworked in Photoshop to create a unique identity for each place. The final images were printed on 70cm square acrylic glass.


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    Future Living Housing Project: Technology Meets Design

    Future Living Housing Project: Technology Meets Design | green infographics | Scoop.it

    The Future Living house took twenty six designers to create it, with every technologic leap analyzed to make sure all proposals were possible by 2050. It’s a paradigm shift in home resource creation and location with water using gravity to generate pressure and energy harvested from solar and wind. Air, water and waste are cleaned using a living bio wall.

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    Zsolt Tinelly's curator insight, January 1, 2:43 PM

    add meg a belátás ...

    Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 10, 8:54 PM

    Making cities sustainable 

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    Infographic: How Aware Are You About Smart Cities?

    Infographic: How Aware Are You About Smart Cities? | green infographics | Scoop.it
    How much do everyday people know about smart city initiatives? In this infographic, learn what Frost & Sullivan discovered after polling 1,000 U.S. consumers to see what they know.
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    How Much Space Do Cars Take? Cyclists Demonstrate How Bicycles Fight Congestion

    How Much Space Do Cars Take? Cyclists Demonstrate How Bicycles Fight Congestion | green infographics | Scoop.it

    People that commute by car spend an inordinate amount of time staring at taillights. There’s no way they’re getting around that traffic in front of them. But what about bike commuters? This group of Latvian cyclists recently created a powerful demonstration of the large footprint created by cars that carry just one occupant.

    The four cyclists strapped on fragile frameworks shaped like cars, then hopped into the local traffic in Riga to show how much room they would occupy on their daily commute. The difference communicates loud and clear: if these cyclists were actually in cars, they would seriously add to congestion.

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    Russell Roberts's curator insight, October 17, 2014 12:23 PM

    Interesting study from Latvia.  Something to think about when fossil fuels  run out or become too expensive to buy. Protection from bad weather is a definite plus for cars.  Or, you could have commuters park their cars in a municipal lot and use bikes to reach their workplaces once they enter the city.  Aloha, Russ.

    Jim Gramata's curator insight, October 27, 2014 10:49 AM

    Visually compelling look at the power of the bike commute 

    Agence Relations d'Utilité Publique's curator insight, November 24, 2014 5:06 AM

    Les images parlent d'elles même...

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    Mapping Los Angeles's Better But Still Terrible Air Quality

    Mapping Los Angeles's Better But Still Terrible Air Quality | green infographics | Scoop.it

    Though the persistent brown halo around Downtown might suggest otherwise, the amount of cancer-causing toxins in the Los Angeles basin air has fallen 65 percent since 2005, says a new report out from the South Coast Air Quality Management District. Don't breathe too deeply yet. Despite the improvement, "The levels still occurring here in Southern California are too high and need to be further reduced," an executive officer of the SCAQMD tells the Daily News.

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    Mapping the LA Neighborhoods Most at Risk From Global Warming

    Mapping the LA Neighborhoods Most at Risk From Global Warming | green infographics | Scoop.it

    The UCLA Luskin Center and Environmental Defense Fund have just released a new report looking at Los Angeles's opportunities for using more solar power (which are still 98% untapped, they say) and it includes these fascinating maps of which areas of LA County are most vulnerable to global warming.

    According to the report, it's the "first study to provide specific climate-change projections for the greater Los Angeles area [in the years 2041 to 2060], with unique projections down to the neighborhood level." By mid-century, SoCal can look forward to "slightly warmer winters and springs but much warmer summers and falls, with more frequent heat waves," but the burden won't be spread around evenly: "The study predicts a likely tripling in the number of extremely hot days in the downtown area and quadrupling the number in the valleys and at high elevations." But of course higher temps aren't the only threat.

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    What's the carbon footprint of the Internet? [Infographic]

    What's the carbon footprint of the Internet? [Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

    What is the carbon footprint of one single Google search? How about a single email? These and many other questions are presented in the following infographic...

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    Income Inequality: It’s Also Bad for Your Health

    Income Inequality: It’s Also Bad for Your Health | green infographics | Scoop.it
    A study found that in places with more unevenness of income, life spans were shorter.

    We know that living in a poor community makes you less likely to live a long life. New evidence suggests that living in a community with high income inequality also seems to be bad for your health.

    A study from researchers at the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute examined a series of risk factors that help explain the health (or sickness) of counties in the United States. In addition to the suspects you might expect — a high smoking rate, a lot of violent crime — the researchers found that people in unequal communities were more likely to die before the age of 75 than people in more equal communities, even if the average incomes were the same.

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    An Interactive Flood Tool to Calculate Climate Change Risks

    An Interactive Flood Tool to Calculate Climate Change Risks | green infographics | Scoop.it
    A new interactive tool estimates the economic, urban, and demographic risks through 2030.

    According to the World Resources Institute, river floods affect 21 million people in the world every year. In 2030, that number could rise to 54 million, with climate change driving the increase and urbanization putting more people in harm's way...

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    Russell Roberts's curator insight, March 26, 12:07 PM

    A valuable tool for urban planners. Honolulu also has similar tools to map the expected loss of shorelines due to rising sea levels.  If climatic trends continue, much of Waikiki and the Ewa Plain will be subject to flooding and rendered unihabitible.  Beach erosion is just the beginning of our urban problems.  Aloha, Russ.

    Judit Urquijo's curator insight, March 29, 12:33 PM

    Información útil

    Descarga: web

    Precio: gratuita

    Idioma: inglés

    Website del desarrollador: World Resources Institute


    Descripción

    El Aqueduct Global Flood Analyzer es una herramienta web interactiva diseñada para mostrar mediante modelos los daños de las inundaciones sobre los entornos urbanos, el PIB y la población, pudiendo consultar esta información tanto desde el punto de vista de la nación, la cuenca hidrográfica o el estado.


    Una vez seleccionado el ámbito, la aplicación permite seleccionar el nivel de protección contra inundaciones medido en años, que hace referencia a los tipos de sistemas construidos para prevenir las inundaciones y que normalmente suelen estar dimensionados en función de los períodos de retorno.


    En base a los citados criterios, la herramienta presenta los costes generados por las inundaciones en base a datos de 2010. La aplicación también permite a los usuarios estimar el riesgo futuro, realizando proyecciones en el contexto de tres escenarios climático y socioeconómicos distintos.  


    Más información

    http://www.citylab.com/weather/2015/03/calculating-the-cost-of-river-floods-in-an-age-of-climate-change/387154/

    http://floods.wri.org/#/

    http://www.wri.org/resources/maps/aqueduct-global-flood-analyzer

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    Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities

    Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities | green infographics | Scoop.it
    Architects and Planners across the country are harnessing the potential of Big Data to build information-laden city-scale models. By gathering and synthesizing such factors as traffic, energy usage, water flows, and air quality, the urban design field is hoping to layout smarter, more efficient, and more resilient forms of development.
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    Hilary McEwan's curator insight, February 17, 7:17 AM

    Having already made a huge difference to the landscape of the financial, public health and manufacturing sectors, it looks like we can expect Big Data to keep on trucking, so to speak, and right in to the major infrastructure decisions that drive our city planning.


    But does it make sense to plan a city on digital footprints instead of real-time foot fall and the day to day needs of the population? Each of us behaves very differently online to how we live offline, so can turning that data into a streetplan really change the way we live for the better?

    Juanma Holgado's curator insight, February 21, 4:57 AM

    Big Data i arquitectura, la construccio inteligent de la ciutat cercant eficiencia i sostenibilitat

    Norm Miller's curator insight, February 23, 11:23 PM

    This is like BMS but for cities.   It makes sense.  

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    Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities

    Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities | green infographics | Scoop.it
    Architects and Planners across the country are harnessing the potential of Big Data to build information-laden city-scale models. By gathering and synthesizing such factors as traffic, energy usage, water flows, and air quality, the urban design field is hoping to layout smarter, more efficient, and more resilient forms of development.
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    Hilary McEwan's curator insight, February 17, 7:17 AM

    Having already made a huge difference to the landscape of the financial, public health and manufacturing sectors, it looks like we can expect Big Data to keep on trucking, so to speak, and right in to the major infrastructure decisions that drive our city planning.


    But does it make sense to plan a city on digital footprints instead of real-time foot fall and the day to day needs of the population? Each of us behaves very differently online to how we live offline, so can turning that data into a streetplan really change the way we live for the better?

    Juanma Holgado's curator insight, February 21, 4:57 AM

    Big Data i arquitectura, la construccio inteligent de la ciutat cercant eficiencia i sostenibilitat

    Norm Miller's curator insight, February 23, 11:23 PM

    This is like BMS but for cities.   It makes sense.  

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    Infographic Outlines Why Green Building is Smart Building

    Infographic Outlines Why Green Building is Smart Building | green infographics | Scoop.it

    While the advantages of green building are no secret, the perception of high up front costs keep a lot of construction conventional. This infographic from Green Building Canada simply breaks down both the environmental and economic benefits of sustainable building. While this is based on green building in Canada, it highlights measures like energy efficiency and LEED certification and how they raise property values, utility savings, and indoor environmental quality. Green Building Canada points out a 9 to 50% reduction in sickness and 18 to 25% reduction in asthma and allergies based on green building measures.

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    Dr. Jose Lepervanche Net's curator insight, February 7, 12:39 PM

    Environmental benefits of building green. Used in our Energy and Environmental courses. 

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    Flowing Maps Explore the City's Impact on the Local Environment

    Flowing Maps Explore the City's Impact on the Local Environment | green infographics | Scoop.it

    Digital artist and illustrator Istvan has created a series of maps which artfully imagine the affect of cities and their human inhabitants on the local environment. His colorful images aren’t scientific in nature, but rather a personal exploration of what it might look like if the energies of the metropolis flowed out of the city itself.

    “I wanted to represent the influence of cities on their environment as a kind of invisible fluid that overflows from the city to its surrounding.”

    The flow of each city map was digitally rendered using local terrain to simulate the erosion flow Istvan desired, then reworked in Photoshop to create a unique identity for each place. The final images were printed on 70cm square acrylic glass.


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    What the Collaborative Economy Means to Marketers [Infographic]

    What the Collaborative Economy Means to Marketers [Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

    When you think of the “collaborative economy,” chances are, you picture people sharing their cars, homes, and money. But that’s not the only thing people are sharing. Now, more and more people are sharing their time. They’re sharing their time to do small projects like deliveries, or they’re helping other businesses online as contractors, or using their time to create physical goods in the maker movement. 

    The result is this: The crowd is becoming like a company -- and enterprising marketers are learning to take advantage of this trend...


    Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
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    The 2014 GOOD City Index

    The 2014 GOOD City Index | green infographics | Scoop.it
    GOOD's annual breakdown of the most inspiring cities in the world.

    'The heartbeat of a city is a difficult thing to measure. Some, like physicists Geoffrey West and Luis Bettencourt, say you can measure a city by the precise pace at which its citizens walk. Others think a city’s true worth lies in the cost of its housing, or the growth of its population, or the fiscal outlook of its property developers. At GOOD, we believe that a city’s heartbeat is best measured in “possibility”—the pervading sense that though a place may be far from perfect, its citizens are taking a bold stake in its future through a mixture of creativity, hustle, and civic engagement.'

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    A Graphic Showing the World's Vanishing Wildlife

    A Graphic Showing the World's Vanishing Wildlife | green infographics | Scoop.it

    The toll of human activity on the world's wildlife population over the past 40 years is devastating. The World Wildlife Fund's (WWF) recently released "2014 Living Planet Report"  shows that between 1970 and 2010, the population of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish around the globe has dropped a shocking 52 percent.

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    Nuno Gaspar de Oliveira's curator insight, October 16, 2014 5:52 AM

    It's capital, the real capital, and it's disappearing #naturalcapital

    LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, January 15, 7:32 AM

    When talking about "Global Warming" we think of the wrong processes—we take the median to be the issue, when in fact it's the weather extremes that cause the greatest havoc—yet still, "Climate Change" does not give the full picture, either. "Climate" refers to one meta-process, while "Change" is a word that many embrace as potentially positive. "Planetary Upheaval" may be a more generally accurate description of what we are facing.

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    Solar Could Be The World's Most Important Energy Source By 2050

    Solar Could Be The World's Most Important Energy Source By 2050 | green infographics | Scoop.it
    Experts believe that a solar boom is both feasible and necessary in order to reign in warming to safe levels.

    Earlier this year, the International Energy Agency published an alarming report predicting catastrophic global warming. Based on current trends, it said, we're set for a 6 degree Celsius temperature increase this century--a level scientists agree would make life untenable for much of the planet. International agreements have set a target of just 2 degrees C, because that's what scientists say would be a relatively safe outcome.

    The IEA did offer positive news, though. It said that an aggressive move to energy efficiency and renewables could keep the world's temperature under 2 degrees, and that such a move need not cost much. In fact, $44 trillion in investment by 2050 would net $115 trillion in fuel savings, such is the wonder of energy efficiency and potential for energy storage...

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    Jim Gramata's curator insight, October 27, 2014 10:45 AM

    I just contracted to put one on my home. Consider solar installations in you next rehab or development project for long term solutions. With federal, state and now local grants the ROI may be right for a solar system installation. 

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    Shaping The Office Of The Future: Workspace Design Trends [Infographic]

    Shaping The Office Of The Future: Workspace Design Trends [Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

    We have been witnessing major transformations in the corporate mentality regarding office design. Here are some of the main workspace design trends...

    According to this infographic from Alliance Interiors, more changes are yet to come, as the office of the future will be less business-focused and more employee-oriented. As a result of switching from closed offices to open offices- one of the most visible upgrade in workspace layout- we find out that the speed and accuracy of work has increased with 440%. This is mostly why open offices will continue to shape working environments in the years to come.

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    Clarence Wong's curator insight, September 5, 2014 1:46 PM

    Norm Miller's insight:  There is more to it than in this review encouraging open offices.  JLL had a nice report that focused on value adding activities and noting that solo thinking in isolation was one of those.  But this is still very useful.