green infographics
Follow
Find
36.8K views | +4 today
 
Scooped by Lauren Moss
onto green infographics
Scoop.it!

How Much Have We Polluted? [infographic]

How Much Have We Polluted? [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

How Much Have We Polluted?

An infographic added to Visual.ly by ElkanoData...

more...
No comment yet.
green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
Curated by Lauren Moss
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Urban and Master Planning
Scoop.it!

Smart Planning for intelligent cities: the open-source paradigm

Smart Planning for intelligent cities: the open-source paradigm | green infographics | Scoop.it
Open-source urbanismWe are increasingly immersed in the society of knowledge, creativity and innovation, today universally regarded as the keys to competitiveness, true anti-cyclical factors with respect to the crisis that has overrun the capitalist...

Via massimo facchinetti
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

The Health Profile Of Every County In America, Mapped

The Health Profile Of Every County In America, Mapped | green infographics | Scoop.it
This snapshot shines a light on how where we live matters when it comes to our well-being.

When we talk about the health of America, we often talk in broad strokes. We focus on big trends—say, in obesity or diabetes—not what's happening at a more local level.

That's unfortunate for two reasons. One, we might miss some of the variety of health out there—for example, that one county in a state is appreciably less healthy than another. And, two, we might overlook local factors that affect our health as much as federal or state policy, or even our own personal responsibility.

The idea of the County Health Rankings is to shine a light on the local, and show how where we live matters.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

New Report: Energy Storage in the U.S. on Pace for a Record-Breaking 2015

New Report: Energy Storage in the U.S. on Pace for a Record-Breaking 2015 | green infographics | Scoop.it

“The U.S. energy storage market is on pace for a record-breaking year.

According to the latest U.S. Energy Storage Monitor, a quarterly report from GTM Research and the Energy Storage Association (ESA), the United States deployed 5.8 megawatts of energy storage in the first quarter of the year. That's up 16 percent over the first quarter of 2014.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

How Does a Passive House Work?

How Does a Passive House Work? | green infographics | Scoop.it

Passive Houses are built according to a rigorous series of design principles that promote efficiency.

The basic building block of a certified Passive House is a virtually airtight, superinsulated envelope that prevents the infiltration of outside air and the loss of conditioned air. Because joints and cracks aren’t a sufficient source of fresh air, Passive Houses are equipped with a ventilator that takes heat from the stale exhaust air and transfers it to the air that is being drawn in from the outside. (In summer, the process reverses, with the cool inside air pretreating the hot intake air before being vented outside.) Passive Houses also are positioned to capture the sun’s natural heating capabilities in the winter while minimizing solar gain in the summer.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

172 drought maps reveal just how thirsty California has become

172 drought maps reveal just how thirsty California has become | green infographics | Scoop.it

Just how dry is California? Here is every map of the state released by the U.S. Drought Monitor since 2011.

The majority of California is experiencing extreme to exceptional drought, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor, and the state's condition isn't expected to improve in the near future.

The Drought Monitor, which collects data from 50 different weather indicators, have shown an increasingly red California since 2011, the last time the drought map was clear.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

What's the carbon footprint of the Internet? [Infographic]

What's the carbon footprint of the Internet? [Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

What is the carbon footprint of one single Google search? How about a single email? These and many other questions are presented in the following infographic...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Income Inequality: It’s Also Bad for Your Health

Income Inequality: It’s Also Bad for Your Health | green infographics | Scoop.it
A study found that in places with more unevenness of income, life spans were shorter.

We know that living in a poor community makes you less likely to live a long life. New evidence suggests that living in a community with high income inequality also seems to be bad for your health.

A study from researchers at the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute examined a series of risk factors that help explain the health (or sickness) of counties in the United States. In addition to the suspects you might expect — a high smoking rate, a lot of violent crime — the researchers found that people in unequal communities were more likely to die before the age of 75 than people in more equal communities, even if the average incomes were the same.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

An Interactive Flood Tool to Calculate Climate Change Risks

An Interactive Flood Tool to Calculate Climate Change Risks | green infographics | Scoop.it
A new interactive tool estimates the economic, urban, and demographic risks through 2030.

According to the World Resources Institute, river floods affect 21 million people in the world every year. In 2030, that number could rise to 54 million, with climate change driving the increase and urbanization putting more people in harm's way...

more...
Russell Roberts's curator insight, March 26, 12:07 PM

A valuable tool for urban planners. Honolulu also has similar tools to map the expected loss of shorelines due to rising sea levels.  If climatic trends continue, much of Waikiki and the Ewa Plain will be subject to flooding and rendered unihabitible.  Beach erosion is just the beginning of our urban problems.  Aloha, Russ.

Judit Urquijo's curator insight, March 29, 12:33 PM

Información útil

Descarga: web

Precio: gratuita

Idioma: inglés

Website del desarrollador: World Resources Institute


Descripción

El Aqueduct Global Flood Analyzer es una herramienta web interactiva diseñada para mostrar mediante modelos los daños de las inundaciones sobre los entornos urbanos, el PIB y la población, pudiendo consultar esta información tanto desde el punto de vista de la nación, la cuenca hidrográfica o el estado.


Una vez seleccionado el ámbito, la aplicación permite seleccionar el nivel de protección contra inundaciones medido en años, que hace referencia a los tipos de sistemas construidos para prevenir las inundaciones y que normalmente suelen estar dimensionados en función de los períodos de retorno.


En base a los citados criterios, la herramienta presenta los costes generados por las inundaciones en base a datos de 2010. La aplicación también permite a los usuarios estimar el riesgo futuro, realizando proyecciones en el contexto de tres escenarios climático y socioeconómicos distintos.  


Más información

http://www.citylab.com/weather/2015/03/calculating-the-cost-of-river-floods-in-an-age-of-climate-change/387154/

http://floods.wri.org/#/

http://www.wri.org/resources/maps/aqueduct-global-flood-analyzer

Rescooped by Lauren Moss from visual data
Scoop.it!

Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities

Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities | green infographics | Scoop.it
Architects and Planners across the country are harnessing the potential of Big Data to build information-laden city-scale models. By gathering and synthesizing such factors as traffic, energy usage, water flows, and air quality, the urban design field is hoping to layout smarter, more efficient, and more resilient forms of development.
more...
Hilary McEwan's curator insight, February 17, 7:17 AM

Having already made a huge difference to the landscape of the financial, public health and manufacturing sectors, it looks like we can expect Big Data to keep on trucking, so to speak, and right in to the major infrastructure decisions that drive our city planning.


But does it make sense to plan a city on digital footprints instead of real-time foot fall and the day to day needs of the population? Each of us behaves very differently online to how we live offline, so can turning that data into a streetplan really change the way we live for the better?

Juanma Holgado's curator insight, February 21, 4:57 AM

Big Data i arquitectura, la construccio inteligent de la ciutat cercant eficiencia i sostenibilitat

Norm Miller's curator insight, February 23, 11:23 PM

This is like BMS but for cities.   It makes sense.  

Rescooped by Lauren Moss from visual data
Scoop.it!

Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities

Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities | green infographics | Scoop.it
Architects and Planners across the country are harnessing the potential of Big Data to build information-laden city-scale models. By gathering and synthesizing such factors as traffic, energy usage, water flows, and air quality, the urban design field is hoping to layout smarter, more efficient, and more resilient forms of development.
more...
Hilary McEwan's curator insight, February 17, 7:17 AM

Having already made a huge difference to the landscape of the financial, public health and manufacturing sectors, it looks like we can expect Big Data to keep on trucking, so to speak, and right in to the major infrastructure decisions that drive our city planning.


But does it make sense to plan a city on digital footprints instead of real-time foot fall and the day to day needs of the population? Each of us behaves very differently online to how we live offline, so can turning that data into a streetplan really change the way we live for the better?

Juanma Holgado's curator insight, February 21, 4:57 AM

Big Data i arquitectura, la construccio inteligent de la ciutat cercant eficiencia i sostenibilitat

Norm Miller's curator insight, February 23, 11:23 PM

This is like BMS but for cities.   It makes sense.  

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Infographic Outlines Why Green Building is Smart Building

Infographic Outlines Why Green Building is Smart Building | green infographics | Scoop.it

While the advantages of green building are no secret, the perception of high up front costs keep a lot of construction conventional. This infographic from Green Building Canada simply breaks down both the environmental and economic benefits of sustainable building. While this is based on green building in Canada, it highlights measures like energy efficiency and LEED certification and how they raise property values, utility savings, and indoor environmental quality. Green Building Canada points out a 9 to 50% reduction in sickness and 18 to 25% reduction in asthma and allergies based on green building measures.

more...
Dr. Jose Lepervanche Net's curator insight, February 7, 12:39 PM

Environmental benefits of building green. Used in our Energy and Environmental courses. 

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Flowing Maps Explore the City's Impact on the Local Environment

Flowing Maps Explore the City's Impact on the Local Environment | green infographics | Scoop.it

Digital artist and illustrator Istvan has created a series of maps which artfully imagine the affect of cities and their human inhabitants on the local environment. His colorful images aren’t scientific in nature, but rather a personal exploration of what it might look like if the energies of the metropolis flowed out of the city itself.

“I wanted to represent the influence of cities on their environment as a kind of invisible fluid that overflows from the city to its surrounding.”

The flow of each city map was digitally rendered using local terrain to simulate the erosion flow Istvan desired, then reworked in Photoshop to create a unique identity for each place. The final images were printed on 70cm square acrylic glass.


more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lauren Moss from MarketingHits
Scoop.it!

What the Collaborative Economy Means to Marketers [Infographic]

What the Collaborative Economy Means to Marketers [Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

When you think of the “collaborative economy,” chances are, you picture people sharing their cars, homes, and money. But that’s not the only thing people are sharing. Now, more and more people are sharing their time. They’re sharing their time to do small projects like deliveries, or they’re helping other businesses online as contractors, or using their time to create physical goods in the maker movement. 

The result is this: The crowd is becoming like a company -- and enterprising marketers are learning to take advantage of this trend...


Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

FEMA’s New Data Viz Tool Helps Communities Understand the Risk and Impact of Disasters

FEMA’s New Data Viz Tool Helps Communities Understand the Risk and Impact of Disasters | green infographics | Scoop.it

FEMA just launched a new data visualization tool aimed at help communities better understand the risk and impact of disasters. The tool charts historical disaster declaration data reaching back to 1953, giving a clear, county-specific picture of the type of disasters that have struck and how much FEMA spent on assistance. With this knowledge, communities can be better prepared for the unexpected and put their focus where it matters most.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

NASA’s massive new dataset gives a daily weather report through 2100

NASA’s massive new dataset gives a daily weather report through 2100 | green infographics | Scoop.it
NASA’s massive new dataset tells us what the daily weather report will be in 2100.

A supercomputer at NASA has just provided us with high-resolution climate projections through the end of the century. The massive new 11-terabyte data set combines historical daily temperatures and precipitation measurements with climate simulations under two greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. The project spans from 1950 to 2100, but users can easily zero in on daily timescales for their own locales—which is precisely the point.

The projections can be found on Amazon for free for all to see and plan by. The space agency hopes that developing nations and poorer communities that may not have any spare supercomputers lying around will use the info to predict and prepare for climate change...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

INFOGRAPHIC: How food waste has become a huge global problem

INFOGRAPHIC: How food waste has become a huge global problem | green infographics | Scoop.it

Every year, an estimated 1.2 to 2 billion tons of food is wasted—a massive amount of food that, if saved, would be more enough to feed the world’s hungry. Food waste isn’t just a humanitarian issue however; the problem is also a waste of land, water, energy and money. To put food wastage in perspective, Arbtech created an infographic that points out some of the world’s worst offenders and explains how food loss occurs throughout the supply chain. Click through to learn more about food waste and, most importantly, what you can do to help.

more...
Suzette Jackson's curator insight, May 24, 2:02 AM

Food waste isn’t just a humanitarian issue however; the problem is also a waste of land, water, energy and money.

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

New York Is the World's Most Wasteful Megacity, in 3 Charts

New York Is the World's Most Wasteful Megacity, in 3 Charts | green infographics | Scoop.it

New York, many say, is the greatest city in the world. It also might be the most wasteful.

That's according to a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The large research team, led by Christopher A. Kennedy of the University of Toronto, examined how 27 "megacities" (metropolitan areas with more than 10 million people) metabolize resources and create waste. Together these monster cities consume 9.3 percent of the world's electricity and produce 12.6 percent of the world's waste—even though they contain only 6.7 percent of the world's population.

more...
Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, May 7, 10:12 PM

“The New York metropolis has 12 million fewer people than Tokyo, yet it uses more energy in total: the equivalent of one oil supertanker every 1.5 days,” he said. “When I saw that, I thought it was just incredible.”

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

The Geography of Well-Being

The Geography of Well-Being | green infographics | Scoop.it

Economic growth has long been the basic metric through which we evaluate economic and social progress. But a growing number of policymakers and experts argue that we need a better way to measure “well being.”

In a recent report, the Social Science Research Council’s Measure of America project takes a crack at it with their own metric. Inspired by the UN’s influential Human Development Index for nations, their American Human Development Index develops measures of well-being for America’s 435 congressional districts (plus Washington, D.C.). This allows us to see how patterns of uneven and unequal socio-economic well-being exist not just between but within many of America’s largest metros...

    more...
    Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, April 25, 7:41 AM

    The overall index is based on three key dimensions of well-being:

    A long and healthy life, as measured by life expectancy at birth.Access to knowledge, based on school enrollment for people ages 3 to 24 (weighted one third) and educational degree attainment for those 25 and older (weighted two-thirds).Standard of living, based on median earnings for full- and part-time workers 16 and older.
    Scooped by Lauren Moss
    Scoop.it!

    By 2050, the Greenest City May Not Be in the First World

    By 2050, the Greenest City May Not Be in the First World | green infographics | Scoop.it
    Cities might be burning three times more energy in 2050 than they did in 2005—unless they act now.

    Currently, more than half of the world’s people live in cities. Given the trend of jobs returning to urban centers, it may not be surprising that by 2030 the world’s cities will be home to 60 percent of the world’s population. Cities are adapting to accommodate the growing population by becoming sustainable and green.

    Yet assuming that the current rapid pace of population growth continues, cities will be burning three times more energy per capita in 2050 than they did in 2005 despite their “green” efforts. Even with increasing favor toward public transport in the first world’s largest cities, the cities with the greatest opportunity to reduce energy use are those in the still-developing second world, particularly in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.

    more...
    No comment yet.
    Scooped by Lauren Moss
    Scoop.it!

    Tracking the World's Nuclear Arsenals: Infographic

    Tracking the World's Nuclear Arsenals: Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

    Since 1945, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists has been tracking nuclear arsenals around the world. Although the group has always made its running tallies available in print, web readers now have an interactive way of visualizing the planet's nuclear stockpiles.

    According to the Nuclear Notebook, there are currently 10,144 nuclear warheads stockpiled around the globe- enough to nearly irradiate the total land mass of the planet.

    more...
    No comment yet.
    Scooped by Lauren Moss
    Scoop.it!

    The Cost of Sprawl: A Visual Comparison

    The Cost of Sprawl: A Visual Comparison | green infographics | Scoop.it

    The cost of sprawl is 2.5 times more expensive than the compact city.

    Sidewalks, water and wastewater pipes, schools and libraries, police and fire protection, and of course, roads. And whether the costs are paid by the homeowner, the local government, or businesses, the lower density in the suburbs leads to higher costs to operate, maintain and replace all these services...

    more...
    Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, March 10, 10:12 AM

         Sprawl is the spread of development over the landscape. For suburban areas it's going to be more expensive than urban areas. Sprawl in suburban areas would overall take more time in making it more as an urban area. Making urban areas more industrial is going to be a lot easier especially since the area has already been industrialized. 

    I.C.

    Eben Lenderking's curator insight, March 11, 8:22 AM

    Pile 'em high

    Suzette Jackson's curator insight, May 24, 2:04 AM

    The cost of sprawl is 2.5 times more expensive than the compact city.

    Scooped by Lauren Moss
    Scoop.it!

    Monitoring Marine Ecosystems: Ocean Acidification and New Efforts in Real Time Assessment

    Monitoring Marine Ecosystems: Ocean Acidification and New Efforts in Real Time Assessment | green infographics | Scoop.it
    Scientists have developed a satellite technique to capture a near real-time view of ocean acidification.

    Their findings, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, showing how data from satellites that measure salinity and other ocean conditions could be combined to produce a new way of monitoring acidification.

    Oceans are taking in about 90 percent of the excess heat created by human greenhouse gas emissions, but they’re also absorbing some of the carbon dioxide (CO2) itself. 

    A set of chemical processes dissolves that CO2 and turns it into carbonic acid and sets off a complex changes to the chemistry of seawater, which dissolves shells and coral and creates a cascade effect that could disrupt entire marine ecosystems.

    A recent study estimated $1 trillion annually in losses caused by ocean acidification by 2100, if left unmitigated. Some research has looked at “designer” corals and other creatures that could survive more acidic seas but more work needs to be done to figure out just what will thrive (or at least survive) the changing acidity...

    more...
    Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Urban and Master Planning
    Scoop.it!

    Eight million tons: Researchers calculate the magnitude of plastic waste going into the ocean

    Eight million tons: Researchers calculate the magnitude of plastic waste going into the ocean | green infographics | Scoop.it
    A plastic grocery bag cartwheels down the beach until a gust of wind spins it into the ocean.

    Via SustainOurEarth, jean-luc scherer, massimo facchinetti
    more...
    Gordon McGlone's curator insight, February 18, 12:59 AM

    The Anthropocene comes plastic wrapped.

    Suzette Jackson's curator insight, May 29, 6:06 AM

    So much plastic, it's mind boggling and it's in almost everything that is marketed. Do you struggle to buy your product or food without packaging? Nude products are what we need...

    Scooped by Lauren Moss
    Scoop.it!

    Infographic: The Cost Of Living Around The World

    Infographic: The Cost Of Living Around The World | green infographics | Scoop.it

    Using data collected from Numbeo—the “world’s largest database of user contributed data about cities and countries worldwide”—web resource Movehub has created an infographic that points out the cost of living in different countries around the world. 

    According to Movehub, the Consumer Price Index (CPI) was used to determine the living costs in the countries, which takes into account the prices for groceries, transportation, restaurants and utilities. 

    Switzerland, Norway, Venezuela and Iceland have been identified as countries with the highest living cost, while India, Nepal, Pakistan and Tunisia have the lowest cost of living. 

    more...
    Suzette Jackson's curator insight, May 29, 6:08 AM

    wondering where your money goes?  the cost of living around the world!

    Scooped by Lauren Moss
    Scoop.it!

    Flowing Maps Explore the City's Impact on the Local Environment

    Flowing Maps Explore the City's Impact on the Local Environment | green infographics | Scoop.it

    Digital artist and illustrator Istvan has created a series of maps which artfully imagine the affect of cities and their human inhabitants on the local environment. His colorful images aren’t scientific in nature, but rather a personal exploration of what it might look like if the energies of the metropolis flowed out of the city itself.

    “I wanted to represent the influence of cities on their environment as a kind of invisible fluid that overflows from the city to its surrounding.”

    The flow of each city map was digitally rendered using local terrain to simulate the erosion flow Istvan desired, then reworked in Photoshop to create a unique identity for each place. The final images were printed on 70cm square acrylic glass.


    more...
    No comment yet.