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creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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California Water Supply, Drought | infographic

California Water Supply, Drought | infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

California is suffering from a third year of drought, with near-record-low reservoirs, mountain snowpack, soil moisture, and river runoff. As a direct result, far less water than usual is available for cities, farms, and natural ecosystems. There are far-reaching effects that will intensify if dry conditions persist. Several response strategies are available that will provide both near-term relief and long-term benefits. This report from NRDC and the Pacific Institute examines the significant potential contributions available from four priority opportunities: improved urban and agricultural water efficiency, reuse and recycling of water, and increased capture of local rain water.

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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, June 17, 7:34 AM

These response strategies challenge our innovation and efficiency. Survival is on the line.

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Solar Power Is A Huge Water Saver (World Water Day Infographic)

Solar Power Is A Huge Water Saver (World Water Day Infographic) | green infographics | Scoop.it

Every year since 1993, the community of nations has focused on the importance of fresh water and advocated for the sustainable management of freshwater resources. Severe droughts experienced recently in places like the American West, the Horn of Africa, Russia, China, and Australia have highlighted the fact that humans are rapidly using up the world's water supplies—and when they’re gone, they’re gone. We are spending one of our most vital resources in greater volumes every day.

One Block Off The Grid recently developed an infographic to illustrate how energy production depends on water. It shows water use by four of the most common energy sources: coal, nuclear, oil and gas, and solar. Solar comes out on top big time.

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Russell Roberts's curator insight, May 2, 10:17 AM

Interesting infographic from Lauren Moss.  This graphic makes a strong case for solar power. It's about time Hawaii integrated more solar power into the grid.  With the adoption of "smart meters" and better grid management, we can lessen our dependence on imported oil for power generation.  Aloha, Russ.

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Putting All the World’s Water into a Big Cube

Putting All the World’s Water into a Big Cube | green infographics | Scoop.it

All the water underground, on the surface, and in the atmosphere amounts to about 332 million cubic miles. That makes a cube with a side of 693 miles, whose base stretches from Indianapolis to Denver. You couldn't even fill the Pacific with the water in that cube, let alone everything else.  

So, the big takeaway here is that the Earth’s oceans are nothing more than a thin film on the surface of the Earth, relatively speaking.


And how big would a cube of just the fresh water be?  It would have sides 202 miles long and sit nicely on top of Iowa.

And the drinkable water cube? Its sides would be 29 miles long and it would fit into Rhode Island.

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Why the World Thirsts for Smarter Water | Sustainable Cities Collective

Why the World Thirsts for Smarter Water | Sustainable Cities Collective | green infographics | Scoop.it

Margaret Catley-Carlson of the Global Water Partnership has said, ”We cannot create water, but we can manage it better, much better.”


We need to become much smarter about how we manage this precious resource and about how we collect, analyze and use water data. There are three ways we can become smarter about water management:  Instrumentation, Big Data analytics, and cooperation.

Find more details at the article link.


Via ParadigmGallery
Lauren Moss's insight:

Many thanks to ParadigmGallery for sharing this very informative link about an increasingly urgent environmental issue...

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ParadigmGallery's curator insight, April 25, 2013 8:34 PM

Water consumption is another important aspect to a sustainable future. This article talks about current technology and thoughts for the future,

Here are some startling stats about how we currently use water:

Americans use about 100 gallons of water at home every day * Millions of the world’s poorest subsist on fewer than five gallons per day * 46 percent of the people on Earth do not have water piped to their homes * Women in developing countries walk an average of 3.7 miles daily to get water * In 15 years 1.8 billon people (a third of the world’s current population) will live in regions of severe water scarcity [1]

 

Cassie Knight's curator insight, May 24, 2013 11:20 PM

Wonderful resource to share in the classroom! I love this quote by Margaret Catley-Carlson of the Global Water Partnership: ”We cannot create water, but we can manage it better, much better.” Something to discuss with students and open their minds to different ideas that might be able to be done in the school or home environment. This resource is great to support in explaining the water cycle with students in class. 

Anna Roughton's curator insight, September 3, 2013 10:31 PM

Water Management Ideas for in  the Classroom

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How can we involve children in solving the world's water woes? (Infographic)

How can we involve children in solving the world's water woes? (Infographic) | green infographics | Scoop.it

The theme for World Water Day this year is cooperation.


This year is also the International Year of Water Cooperation. If we’re going to work together to overcome the challenges of a region that has a water problem, it’s going to take the participation of everyone – children included.

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Mercor's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:52 AM

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Environmental Data Mapped: Ecosystem Stress in the Great Lakes

Environmental Data Mapped:  Ecosystem Stress in the Great Lakes | green infographics | Scoop.it

A first-of-its-kind map that pulls together numerical data on nearly three dozen factors that affect the Great Lakes ecosystem shows that the lakes with the most urban and agricultural development in their watersheds are also those with the greatest environmental stress.


Lakes Erie and Ontario, the easternmost lakes, are challenged by high coastal population densities, an industrial legacy and phosphorous pollution from agricultural runoff. They are also downstream from wind currents that drop nitrogen generated by industries and power plants into their waters.

But the map’s patches of high-stress red and yellow should not be misinterpreted. The color scale is a relative measure that compares the combined stress of the 34 environmental indicators in a particular area to the stress level of the lake system as a whole.


To create the maps, the research team queried some 160 experts from universities, nonprofits and government agencies in the United States and Canada and compiled a list of 50 key biological, chemical or physical indicators, of which two-thirds had data sufficient enough to be plotted.

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Infographic: The Global Water Crisis

Infographic: The Global Water Crisis | green infographics | Scoop.it
Despite the critical role that water has in our everyday lives, few people realize that the world’s freshwater supply is facing a major crisis in the near future.

Take a look at this infographic for more details, statistics and data on the 'invisible threat to humanity's future' to help increase awareness with regard to the global water crisis...

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Hydro-Logic: Balancing Limited Water Supply with Increased Demand

Hydro-Logic: Balancing Limited Water Supply with Increased Demand | green infographics | Scoop.it

The hydrological water year starts every autumn on 1 October and extends to the following 30 September. The available description from the USGS does not explain why this is the period considered, but there is some natural logic to the hydrological year: with the end of summer comes the (approximate) end of intense evaporation from reservoirs and the beginning of the seasons in which the net water balance in a watershed is generally positive. That is, in general, precipitation > evaporation.

Normally, from the beginning through about two-thirds of the water year, water is stored in the higher reaches of large watersheds as snowpack, which melts and runs off through the rest of the water year. Stream flows generally continue to drop from October through winter, but then rise significantly at the start of the melt season. That imbalance applies over a period longer than a single storm and for the whole watershed, not just on a random wet or dry day in one's own neighborhood.


One of the more interesting areas to observe the water year is the Colorado River Basin (CRB) in the southwestern US. The Colorado River has become so strictly regulated, in part because of gross over-allocation, over nearly a century of intensive use that it has become what I think is a consummate example of the coupled natural - human system...


Visit the link for a closer look at this detailed map of the CRB natural and engineered systems designed for National Geographic. Also, obtain more information regarding statistics on CRB flows and the status of reservoirs and other river operations, including links to various organizations and resources for further study...

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Always thought that Tap Water was clean? Think again (Infographic)

Always thought that Tap Water was clean? Think again (Infographic) | green infographics | Scoop.it

Did you know that tap water can contain pesticides, herbicides, bacterias, micro-organisms, organic materials and radio-nuclicides which can cause water-related illness?

Learn how you can reduce the risk of disease by up to 33% with effective water filtration...

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Mapping Global Water Stress

Mapping Global Water Stress | green infographics | Scoop.it

Water scarcity is likely to be one of the great problems facing the planet this century. Various risk factors contribute to the scarcity of clean water. A new mapping tool from the World Resources Institute visualizes how those risk factors can combine to create large problems, or how conditions can be improved to reduce the potential for water shortages between now and 2095.

The Water Risk Atlas shows how variable environmental conditions, human activities and regulatory environments affect the stability of water sources all over the world. One-year and three-year socioeconomic droughts can be displayed, as can baseline water stress, seasonal variability, inter-annual variability, and flood frequency. The tool also shows projected water stress levels for the years 2025, 2050 and 2095, under three different climate change scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

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Cool Infographics - Blog - Lakes & Oceans: A Deep Infographic

Cool Infographics - Blog - Lakes & Oceans: A Deep Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

Another great infographic from Randall Munroe’s xkcd online comic. Lakes & Oceans visualizes the various depths of the worlds water, and even includes…a mysterious door that James Cameron built his deep-sea submersible to reach at the bottom of the Marianas Trench and open?

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Water Infographics

Water Infographics | green infographics | Scoop.it
Water is one of the most basic needs, and a good portion of our planet is already experiencing a major shortage of water that is safe to drink.

Here are some well-illustrated infographics about H2O. Our first two infographics of the day come from GOOD, who partnered with Levis last year and rolled out a whole line of water-themed infographics. The first appeals to the humanitarian in you, while the second appeals to your checkbook. Save water, save lives and money...

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Sponsored Infographic: Saving Water with Style

Sponsored Infographic: Saving Water with Style | green infographics | Scoop.it

Levi's has created a line of jeans which requires significantly less water to make.

As the first apparel company to require manufacturers to protect water quality and restrict the use of harmful chemicals, Levi's has helped ensure that water leaving its factories is cleaner than the water that comes in.

Continuing with their commitment to water consciousness, Levi's has created Water<less jeans, which requires significantly less water during the manufacturing process. Click on the infographic to learn more about how the company did it...

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Infographic: Are We on the Path to Peak Water?

Infographic: Are We on the Path to Peak Water? | green infographics | Scoop.it

Many scientists and experts fear that humanity is reaching the point of peak water — the point at which freshwater is being consumed faster than it is being replenished or available. In the infographic above we take a look at the amount of water use around the world. Can we cut back before we reach the point of no return?


Kylie Schultz researched, wrote and produced this infographic as a participant in the Ensia Mentor Program. Her mentor for the project was Ensia director Todd Reubold. Infographic design and layout byAmber Billings.

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How Can You Reduce Your Water Footprint?

How Can You Reduce Your Water Footprint? | green infographics | Scoop.it

How much water do you use every day?  The answer might surprise you

A paper released online last week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concluded that Americans significantly underestimate their water use.

Curious how my friends and family would fare, I reached out via social media and posed the simple question, “how much water do you use each day?”  The results in my quick survey ranged to from 2 gallons to 300 gallons, but the most common estimate was 10 to 15 gallons per day.  In reality, Americans use closer to 90 gallons of water a day.  To put things in perspective, a 10-minute shower with an EPA WaterSense labeled high efficiency showerhead consumes 22 gallons, while a 20 minute shower with an older, high flow showerhead could be as much as 100 gallons.  Last month, Governor Brown declared a state of emergency and called on all Californians to conserve water in every way possible. 

Knowing how much water you use, and how and where you use it, are important first steps in determining the most effective ways you can save water in your home and business.

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, March 12, 7:43 PM

Water, water, everywhere but not a drop to waste.

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The true cost of water

The true cost of water | green infographics | Scoop.it

The market’s perverse water pricing creates opportunities for businesses that look beyond the market and consider the true cost of H20.

The environmental and social costs of global business water use add up to around $1.9 trillion per year, according to new research.

Some of these external water costs already are being internalized and hitting bottom lines: Just last year, the worst drought in the United States in 50 years sent commodity prices skyrocketing. Companies, especially those in the food, beverage and apparel sectors whose margins and supply chains are tightly linked to agricultural commodities, can use the true cost of water to get ahead of the trend of external costs increasingly being internalized through regulations, pricing or shortages...

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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, May 18, 2013 7:06 PM

Understanding the true costs of resources, and accounting for these costs, is critical to realistically reaching the goal of Zero Footprint.

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Infographic: Together, We Can Save a Whole Lot More Water

Infographic: Together, We Can Save a Whole Lot More Water | green infographics | Scoop.it

World Water Day is one day a year when a lot of people start paying attention to water issues, and that's not a bad thing, but we really need sustained focus on this particular global resource.


It will be one of the biggest drivers in geopolitics in our lifetime, no doubt about it. China is redirecting mighty rivers to satisfy its need, and closer to home, the fight over the contents of the Colorado River isn't going away anytime soon.

Check out this simple infographic that illustrates just how much we could collectively conserve if we just cut back 5 percent in our use...

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Water: Cooperation or Competition | Infographic

Water: Cooperation or Competition | Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

To help promote the International Year of Water Cooperation, which is launched this week, this diagram explores the main challenges faced by water cooperation today...

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Mercor's curator insight, February 12, 2013 12:18 PM

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Water: Global facts + statistics [infographic]

Water: Global facts + statistics [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Ever notice how we ask for “just water” at a restaurant? Like the source of all life is somehow inferior to soda or a glass of wine (both of which are mostly water)? A new infographic gives you just about every fact you need to know about water… including the ways we’re wasting it.

Take a look, and stop by the original article to share any other facts about water you wished more people knew. 

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Don't Worry, Drive On: Fossil Fools & Fracking Lies

Don't Worry, Drive On: Fossil Fools & Fracking Lies | green infographics | Scoop.it
Two things never seem to change about crude oil: the constant warnings that our thirst for it is unsustainable, and the fact that we continue to use it...

 

These two troubling trends are issues which should be dealt with, and quickly, as this intriguing motion graphic from The Post Carbon Institute points out.
They make the case that in recent years the political rhetoric has increased, pointing to so-called “new” technologies as solutions to the un-sustainability of fossil fuels. One such technology, fracking, aims high pressure water and chemicals into our soils, releasing both oil and natural gasses. In fact an old technology, a multitude of problems arise from its use, not least of which is the pollution of ground waters and the destabilization of soils resulting in earthquakes in previously stable areas. As if that wasn’t bad enough, the technology is expensive to use and only begins to makes sense financially in a world with high enough fuel prices – the world of today.


Isn’t it time we start getting realistic about our true fuel situation? Watch the video at the link for more information, then check out The Post Carbon Institute to show your support...

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Brad Wells's curator insight, October 21, 12:43 PM

This is info-packed...

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Virtual Water: Motion Graphics

Virtual Water: Motion Graphics | green infographics | Scoop.it

Most of the water we use - 92 % of it - is used in food production. Most of this water is managed by the world’s farmers. With the help of science and technology they have performed greater and greater miracles in improving water productivity – in getting more crops per drop.

The good news is that each one of us can also make the world a little more water secure, ready to face the needs of our peak population future.

The answer lies in our shopping baskets...

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Food and Water infographics | Center for Investigative Reporting

Food and Water infographics | Center for Investigative Reporting | green infographics | Scoop.it

There's something about a searing hot summer day that leads a guy to kick off his shoes, turn on his fan and head to the Internet in search of cool graphics about the importance of water in the global food system.

Thanks to the Water Footprint Network, where we found several of these...

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Interactive Infographic: Your Daily Dose of Water

Interactive Infographic: Your Daily Dose of Water | green infographics | Scoop.it
Find out all the hidden ways your daily habits add to your water footprint on a typical day.

 

In America, the average person uses nearly 2,000 gallons of water per day. Every time you flush the toilet, wash your hands, drive your car, or take a bite of your lunch, you're using water. The biggest surprise may be that 95 percent of your water footprint isn't from a long shower or running your washing machine—it's from the food, energy and products you use every day. Check out our interactive infographic that shows all the ways your daily dose of water adds up on a typical day...

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TakePart Infographic: Not A Drop to Drink

TakePart Infographic: Not A Drop to Drink | green infographics | Scoop.it

You’ve heard there’s a water crisis. But, what does that mean? When water flows in seemingly limitless quantities out of the tap and gets trucked to cities in bottles by the ton, it doesn’t seem like water is something we’re in danger of losing.

 

Water quantity and quality should be a top issue for Americans. In this infographic created with TakePart are the four major components of the issue, and how they’re all connected.

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Eco-Housing 101 [infographic]

Eco-Housing 101 [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it
The tips range from basic knowledge, such as turning off the water when you brush your teeth, to insulation tips that can put more than a few pennies back into your wallet.
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