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creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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Heat Mapping the World's Hottest Temperatures

Heat Mapping the World's Hottest Temperatures | green infographics | Scoop.it
The Andrew Sykes Group, a large air conditioning firm based in the UK, has developed this interactive displaying record highs, and current temperatures from select cities across the globe. 

While Climate Central's interactive tool (displaying the average temperature cities across the U.S. are expected to reach by 2100) did little to make those of us suffering a sweltering summer feel optimistic about the future, the interactive graphic at the link provides some perspective that current temperatures could be worse.

The Andrew Sykes Group has developed this interactive displaying record highs, and current temperatures from select cities across the globe. Smaller nodes represent cities, while larger nodes stand for the hottest temperatures ever seen on each continent.

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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, August 9, 2014 8:08 PM

The Andrew Sykes Group has developed this interactive displaying record highs, and current temperatures from select cities across the globe. Smaller nodes represent cities, while larger nodes stand for the hottest temperatures ever seen on each continent.

Russell Roberts's curator insight, September 14, 2014 4:10 AM

Fascinating interactive tool that displays the rising temperature trends around the world.  Science fact or just natural cycles, the planet is getting warmer.  This graphic is a sobering reminder of how lucky were are right now.  The future is going to be hot, drier, and more uncomfortable than it is now.  Aloha, Russ.

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Visualizing How New York City Heats Up In The Summertime

Visualizing How New York City Heats Up In The Summertime | green infographics | Scoop.it

If you find the summer heat hard to take, cities are the worst places to be. Studies show that urban spaces can be up to three degrees hotter than surrounding areas. That's because of the "heat island effect"--which is what you get from paving every available surface with heat-absorbing asphalt and concrete.


Using a thermal camera, these graphics by artist-researcher Nickolay Lamm explain how a city gets hot and stays hot.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 3:39 AM

Consequences of urbanisation

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Watch 62 Years of Global Warming in 13 Seconds

Watch 62 Years of Global Warming in 13 Seconds | green infographics | Scoop.it

An amazing 13-second NASA animation depicting how the globe has warmed during the period of 1950 to 2012.


From our friends at NASA comes this amazing 13-second animation that depicts how temperatures around the globe have warmed since 1950. You’ll note an acceleration of the temperature trend in the late 1970s as greenhouse gas emissions from energy production increased worldwide and clean air laws reduced emissions of pollutants that had a cooling effect on the climate, and thus were masking some of the global warming signal.


The data come from NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York (GISS), which monitors global surface temperatures. As NASA notes, “All 10 of the warmest years in the GISS analysis have occurred since 1998, continuing a trend of temperatures well above the mid-20th century average.

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Diedert Debusscher's curator insight, January 28, 2013 4:25 AM

Why we should care about global warming. And keep working on solutions (they exist).

Mercor's curator insight, January 31, 2013 9:55 AM

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State-by-State Temperature Map: Red-Hot Out West

State-by-State Temperature Map: Red-Hot Out West | green infographics | Scoop.it

Take a look at this year's temperatures by state. California was five degrees warmer than its 20th-century average, whereas Michigan and Mississippi experienced near record cold. 

That is to say, climate change doesn't mean it will never be cold again, but it does mean that when a heat wave hits, it is more likely to be more extreme than the ones preceding it. "It is very likely that heat waves will be more intense, more frequent and longer lasting in a future warmer climate," the Intergovernmetnal Panel on Climate Change wrote back in 2007.

Any individual weather event or pattern can't be blamed directly on the atmospheric changes caused by burning fossil fuels. But if we ask the question a little bit differently, we can discern a climate trend: how likely is it that California would be experiencing the kind of heat we've seen without the human influence on the climate? It might happen, but it'd be very, very unlikely.

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Summer Energy Consumption | Infographic

Summer Energy Consumption | Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

Ever wondered about energy consumption during the heat of the summer season? 

The longer warmer days are when many prople take vacations, enjoy the outdoors and find creative ways to beat the heat. SaveOnEnergy.com took a closer look at how energy use stacks up in the hottest months of the year compared with every other season.

The data reveals some surprising insights about renewable energy use, fossil fuel consumption, and where (and when) the most energy is consumed in the U.S...

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Map of the Day: The State of a Warming America

Map of the Day: The State of a Warming America | green infographics | Scoop.it
Temperatures rose in each of the continental 48 states since 1970.

In the United States, the first five months of 2012 have been the warmest on record. More than 100 cities out of 150 recorded have seen their warmest recorded temperatures.

Just a quick glance at this chart gives a good insight into how steamy our cities have been so far this year. But while this year is off-the charts it's not a surprise. We've seen temperatures on the rise for decades, as a new report from Climate Central illustrates.

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