green infographics
Follow
Find tag "sustainability"
31.3K views | +3 today
green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
Curated by Lauren Moss
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Sustaining Seven Billion People

Sustaining Seven Billion People | green infographics | Scoop.it

"With seven billion people now living on Earth, the ever growing demand is putting unprecedented pressure on global resources—especially forests, water, and food. How can Earth’s resources be managed best to support so many people? One key is tracking the sum of what is available, and perhaps nothing is better suited to that task than satellites."



Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 24, 6:53 AM

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  Satellite imagery can help answer these questions. 


Tagsremote sensing, geospatial, images, sustainability, agriculture, food production, environment modify, unit 5 agriculture

Russell Roberts's curator insight, July 5, 9:53 PM

Thanks to environmental reporter Wes Thomas and professor Seth Dixon for this incisive analysis of how to provide sustenance to a world population nearing the 7 billion mark.  Dixon says the key is tracking the "sum of what is available...and perhaps nothing is better suited to the task than satellites."  Ever since the launch of "Landsat" and resource imaging satellites, scientists have been collecting data on global resources such as water, land use, forests, and crop production.  Dixon and Thomas say it's time the data were  put into a plan to fight hunger and habitat destruction around the world.  Such a plan may work if we as humans can keep from killing ourselves over religion, politics, and territory.  A tall order , indeed.  Aloha de Russ.

Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, July 6, 9:09 AM

Such studies of the agriculture around the world are essential. The way we are doing agriculture to support seven billion people now, peaking at 9-10 billion in another 60 years, it is clear that we are putting severe strains on the environment.  But we have grown lazy, and we are doing it all wrong.

 

We CAN drastically reduce the amount of meat we consume, and thus quickly reduce the amount of arable land we need.  We CAN grow plants in ways that actually sequester more carbon and improve the soil it over time rather than erode and degrade.  And we CAN in fact grow all the food we need in the space we live in, thus enabling us to recycle all the water used as well, which is mostly just lost in evaporation. 

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

3 tips for companies to reduce carbon in their supply chains [infographic]

3 tips for companies to reduce carbon in their supply chains  [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Cutting carbon is not just about reducing emissions. The bulk of the problem lies along the supply chain, which should be meaningfully engaged.

The corporate sector is facing some stark and irrefutable truths regarding climate change.

First, at over 400 parts per million, atmospheric carbon is skyrocketing. If large companies are going to achieve their carbon reduction targets, it's imperative that they engage their supply base.

Visit the link for three top tips on how to kick-off doing so.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lauren Moss from visual data
Scoop.it!

Dos and don’ts: 5 tips for successful infographics for sustainability

Dos and don’ts: 5 tips for successful infographics for sustainability | green infographics | Scoop.it

It is no longer a secret that to communicate effectively we need a combination of words, numbers and images; hence the popularity of infographics. In the field of sustainability and corporate responsibility, where communication is overburdened with indicators and statistics, this mix is particularly suited to getting messages across to both experts and new audiences. Indeed, adopting a variety of formats reflects broader trends in digital communications...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Infographic: How Our Cities Are Shaping Us

Infographic: How Our Cities Are Shaping Us | green infographics | Scoop.it

Architects and city planners are becoming more and more familiar with the health effects of our built environment.  This to-the-point infographic, designed by Chris Yoon, cites a few ways in which mid-20th century city planning trends have contributed to a growing obesity problem in the United States.  This data has alarmed scientists, planners and city officials into stressing the importance of redesigning the physical spaces so as to encourage physical activity and healthy choices.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

INFOGRAPHIC: It Pays to Go Green!

INFOGRAPHIC: It Pays to Go Green! | green infographics | Scoop.it
An infographic explaining the benefits of going green for small business.


Why does sustainable architecture matter in small business?
Learn the answer(s) with this infographic from Autodesk.

more...
Rebekah Ellis's curator insight, June 12, 2013 6:54 AM

Start here - jot down two things that are interesting to you. Be prepared to discuss.

fc3arch's curator insight, July 15, 2013 6:30 PM

It's just smart design.

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Top 10 Cities with the Greenest Homes

Top 10 Cities with the Greenest Homes | green infographics | Scoop.it

San Francisco and Washington D.C. are two of the country's 10 cities with the greenest homes. The newly released analysis covered each city's overall carbon dioxide emissions and the number of homes for sale with green features or ratings. 


Sustainable features included solar panels, low-flow faucets, dual-pane windows, Energy Star-labeled appliances, LEED certification, and new construction by green builders.

Visit the article link for further information about each top-10 city’s green initiatives.

more...
Re/Max Atlantic - Pamela Stearns's curator insight, April 30, 2013 9:16 PM

This real-estate service provides homeowners with quality homes through a service that adheres to providing excellent customer quality.

Gary Mitchell's comment, May 2, 2013 1:09 PM
More and more cities are starting to realize how important it is ti be eco friendly
Gary Mitchell's comment, May 2, 2013 1:10 PM
to*
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

INFOGRAPHIC: Turning Your Supply Chain into a Supply Circle

INFOGRAPHIC: Turning Your Supply Chain into a Supply Circle | green infographics | Scoop.it

By improving resource productivity and using less for each unit of output, manufacturers can improve value, cut costs and reduce their exposure to volatile commodity prices. McKinsey & Company shows how new business models that transform the supply chain into a “supply circle” can significantly improve efficiency and profits...


(view the complete infographic at the article link)

more...
Mercor's curator insight, January 31, 2013 6:52 AM

Scooped by Lauren Moss

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

An Integrated Perspective: the 2013 Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report

An Integrated Perspective: the 2013 Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report | green infographics | Scoop.it
The new Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report ranks energy systems of 105 countries from an integrated economic, environmental and energy security perspective.

The findings reveal that high-income countries have proven best at managing the transition to a new energy architecture. Norway ranks in first place in the index, where a strong energy policy coupled with multiple energy resources has delivered cheap, plentiful and relatively clean power and generated large national revenues.
However, the index also finds that high-income and rapidly growing countries alike often underperform across a wide range of environmental sustainability metrics. With demand for energy rapidly increasing at the same time as some nations are reconsidering costly renewable obligations and CO2 targets, the report calls for affirmative action to address this.
Lauren Moss's insight:

For a visual representation of the statistics, visit the link at the article for the report's interactive map, ranking countries on a numerical scale on the following categories:

  • overall performance
  • economic growth and development
  • environmental sustainability
  • energy access and security
more...
Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, December 11, 2012 5:39 PM

The scale and complexity of the global energy industry demands a country-by-country approach to managing change,” said Arthur Hanna, Managing Director, Energy Industry, Accenture, and a Member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on New Energy Architecture. “The Energy Architecture Performance Index helps nations take stock of their energy architecture challenges and identify specific focus areas coupled with best-in-class examples to use when managing their transition.

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Scorecard for the Sea: The Ocean Health Index

Scorecard for the Sea: The Ocean Health Index | green infographics | Scoop.it
To feed, employ, and sustain the world, our oceans must first be in good health. It is becoming increasingly clear that humans have a substantial impact on these marine ecosystems, and that these impacts are not just threatening the high-seas, but also the humans that depend on them for their livelihoods and well-being.

The health of our oceans is, therefore, primarily a human concern. But how do we measure the health of something as vast and bewildering as an entire ocean?

For many years, scientists have struggled to find a way to make the concept of ocean health meaningful and measureable. There have been a few breakthroughs but no real solution to allow us to concretely measure if things are getting better or worse and by how much? That is, until now.

Published in last week’s issue of the journal Nature The Ocean Health Index is a groundbreaking tool that allows us to take a look at how we as humans benefit from the big blue. The Index examines social, economic, and ecological factors, scaling both globally and locally to give us an accurate assessment. It finally gives us the baseline we need to measure progress...

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Transition Culture
Scoop.it!

What is strong sustainability?

What is strong sustainability? | green infographics | Scoop.it

The concept of strong sustainability is based on the scientific fact that all human life and activity occurs within the limitations of planet Earth, or the 'biosphere' where humankind lives, including all societal functions, such as the economy.

 

It is a self-evident truth that without a functioning biosphere there can be no society or 'sociosphere', and without a sociosphere there can be no societal functions, including an economy or 'econosphere'.


Via Christoph Hensch
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Clean Energy Trends 2014: New Solar Energy Capacity Exceeds Wind For First Time

Clean Energy Trends 2014: New Solar Energy Capacity Exceeds Wind For First Time | green infographics | Scoop.it

Clean Edge's latest report on the global energy market shines a spotlight on five key clean energy trends likely to shape future.

The landscape of the global renewable energy market continues to shift with changes in economic and social conditions and policies. While some renewable energy sectors – notably, solar photovoltaic (PV) deployment – experienced “dazzling growth, success and rising stock prices,” others saw a drop in deployments, as well as challenges on the policy and finance fronts, according to a global clean energy market report from Clean Edge, released March 26.


More details and data at the link.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

New Interactive Map Estimates Solar Potential For D.C. Buildings

New Interactive Map Estimates Solar Potential For D.C. Buildings | green infographics | Scoop.it

Have you ever wondered what the solar potential of your home is? Or where you work? Or the White House maybe?


A new interactive map commissioned by the District Department of the Environment and created by Mapdwell allows users to click on almost any building in the city and see "how much electricity can be produced on their rooftops from solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, how the financial investment will pay off, and how much pollution will be reduced." You can also see where solar systems are already installed and what the yearly financial benefit is.

The data used to create the map comes from the Army's Light Detection and Ranging (Lidar) system, aerial imagery from the D.C. Geographic Information System and building footprints from EarthData International, Inc. Mapdwell is "a collaborative effort by researchers, academics, and professionals at MIT."

more...
Bertrand Auzemery's curator insight, December 18, 2013 12:12 AM

Potentiel solaire de nos toits

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

How Green is Your State? Find Out With This Interactive Map

How Green is Your State? Find Out With This Interactive Map | green infographics | Scoop.it
MPHOnline created an interactive map to determine the best and the worst (How Green is Your State?

There are many ways to assess the greenness of your home state. MPHOnline‘s approach was to consider a state’s energy makeup, gasoline consumption per capita, greenhouse gas emissions, air and water quality, recycling efforts and availability of public transportation.

Using this data from state energy, waste, transportation and environmental management agencies, MPHOnline created an interactive map to determine how each state ranks.


Visit the link and click on your state to see how it fares.

more...
Bhopkins's curator insight, November 18, 2013 7:37 AM

Maryland:  Not Very Green, except, perhaps, on recycling.

Electric Car's curator insight, November 18, 2013 8:56 PM

Spend your hard earned dollars on research into free, clean energy hich maximizes output of solar, wind, other unused free sources of energy,  instead of "investing" in poisonous drilling and mining, shipping oil hungry equipment polluting the planet, and paying ever increasing prices for ancient fossilized sunshine just for electricity production.  

Maxwell Tech's curator insight, January 10, 10:18 AM

How green is your state? Check out this nifty interactive map from EcoLiving and learn about your state's green rating. Let's try to get more green on the map, U.S.!

Rescooped by Lauren Moss from visual data
Scoop.it!

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic)

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | green infographics | Scoop.it

For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future.

In the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned “arcology” - a word that combines “architecture” and “ecology," with a goal of building structures to house large populations in self-contained environments with a self-sustaining economy and agriculture.
 
“In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri)
more...
luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 4:42 AM
For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future as giant structures that contain entire metropolises. To some, these buildings present the best means for cities to exist in harmony with nature, while others forsee grotesque monstrosities destructive to the human spirit. In the mid-20th century, engineer and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller imagined city-enclosing plastic domes and enormous housing projects resembling nuclear cooling towers. These ideas are impractical but they explore the limits of conventional architectural thinking.  Science fiction writers and artists often imagine future architecture that oppresses the human spirit. Megastructures such as the pyramid-like Tyrell Buildings of “Blade Runner” dominate a decrepit skyline. The decaying old city is simply covered with layers of newer, larger buildings in a process of “retrofitting.” Beginning in the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned a more humane approach. The word “arcology” is a combination of “architecture” and “ecology.” The goal is to build megastructures that would house a population of a million or more people, but in a self-contained environment with its own economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri) In 1996, a group of 75 Japanese corporations commissioned Soleri to design the one-kilometer-tall Hyper Bulding, a vertical city for 100,000 people. Existing in harmony with nature, the Hyper Building was designed to recycle waste, produce food in greenhouses, and use the sun’s light and heat for power and climate control.  The structure was designed for passive heating and cooling without the need for machinery. An economic recession put the brakes on the project and it was never built. Soleri’s arcology concept is being put to the test in the Arcosanti experimental community being built in Arizona. Construction began in 1970. When complete the town will house 5,000 people. Buildings are composed of locally produced concrete and are designed to capture sunlight and heat. To be built in the desert near Abu Dhabi, Masdar is a 2.3-square-mile (6 sq km) planned city of 40,000 residents. Buildings are designed to reduce reliance on artificial lighting and air conditioning, and the city will run entirely on solar power and renewable energy. Begun in 2006, the project is planned for completion around 2020-2025.
Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 9, 2013 2:44 AM

Amazing and beautiful analysis!! Believe it or not, the science fiction also has something to teach us about the city of tomorrow.

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Infographic: Sustainable Energy for All... What Will It Take?

Infographic:  Sustainable Energy for All... What Will It Take? | green infographics | Scoop.it

What will it take to meet the Sustainable Energy for All goals for energy access, renewable energy, and energy efficiency by 2030?


The Global Tracking Initiative combines the work of 15 international organizations to show where the world is today in energy access, renewable energy, and energy efficiency, and how far it needs to go to meet the 2030 goals.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Digital Sustainability
Scoop.it!

Cisco, Google Top Greenpeace's Cool IT Leaderboard for Energy Innovation

Cisco, Google Top Greenpeace's Cool IT Leaderboard for Energy Innovation | green infographics | Scoop.it

This is Greenpeace International’s sixth edition of its Cool IT Leaderboard. 


The three main criteria used in the rankings were:

  1. An offering of IT solutions to reduce energy demand
  2. The management of their own energy footprint
  3. How they use their influence to advocate for government policies that encourage renewable energy and energy efficiency

This year most companies made the biggest strides in enabling a renewably powered economy. However, most companies were found to be underperforming in demanding a policy shift towards new investment in smart grid and clean energy solutions.

Companies that were successful in Greenpeace's ranking were the most active in the political arena. Sprint, Google, Wipro and SoftBank all prioritized policy changes to incentivize investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy across the U.S., Japan, and India...


Via Digital Sustainability
more...
Digital Sustainability's curator insight, April 25, 2013 7:56 AM

“Tech giants have the capacity to lead society to cleaner, smarter energy systems, as both Cisco and Google have demonstrated,” announced Greenpeace International Senior IT analyst Gary Cook. The two companies tied for first place in a recent evaluation of the top 21 IT and telecom firms that prioritize energy solutions to climate change as a core aspect of their business model. Ericsson made it to the podium in third place, Fujitsu came in fourth, and Sprint, Wipro and Hewlett Packard all tied for fifth.

This is Greenpeace International’s sixth edition of its Cool IT Leaderboard. The three main criteria used in the rankings were:

An offering of IT solutions to reduce energy demandThe management of their own energy footprintHow they use their influence to advocate for government policies that encourage renewable energy and energy efficiency

This year most companies made the biggest strides in enabling a renewably powered economy. However, most companies were found to be underperforming in demanding a policy shift towards new investment in smart grid and clean energy solutions. This is further hampered by companies such as Duke Energy in the U.S. and TEPCO in Japan shunning the innovative potential of the IT sector in favor of polluting and using centralized electricity generation through coal or nuclear energy.

Companies that were successful in Greenpeace's ranking were the most active in the political arena. Sprint, Google, Wipro and SoftBank all prioritized policy changes to incentivize investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy across the U.S., Japan, and India.

Policy change needs to go beyond the global or even the national scale. For example, in North Carolina where AT&T, Cisco, Google, IBM, and Wipro all operate, these companies could work together to demand renewable energy from the imperfect Duke Energy or step in to defend state renewable energy policies currently at risk from fossil-fuel funded groups such as the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC).

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Infographic: Companies unprepared to address resource scarcities

Infographic:  Companies unprepared to address resource scarcities | green infographics | Scoop.it
New research shows that many businesses around the world won’t start planning until 2018. Is this too late?

Despite widespread warnings of resource scarcity over the next few decades, a significant proportion of global businesses are not prepared to address the predicted shortfall, according to new research by Carbon Trust.
The U.K.-based organization’s survey of 475 executives in the U.S., Brazil, China, Korea and the U.K. revealed while a majority acknowledged that their companies would have to charge more for their products and services as a result of resource constraints, 43 percent are not monitoring risks posed by incidents such as energy price increases and environmental disasters. Over 50 percent have not developed goals to reduce their company’s consumption of water, waste production or carbon emissions...

View the Carbon Trust infographic for more details on the survey.
more...
Duane Craig's curator insight, December 20, 2012 8:19 AM

And, the construction sector is woefully unprepared...

Jim Gramata's curator insight, December 21, 2012 7:37 PM

The earth is bounded and its resources finite. Hopefully it will be a proactive and not reactive decision to do what is critical to the sustainability of the earth. Spread the word....

Mercor's curator insight, January 31, 2013 6:50 AM

Scooped by Lauren Moss

Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Eco-Literacy Map | Visual.ly

Eco-Literacy Map | Visual.ly | green infographics | Scoop.it

'The Visual Communication of Ecological Literacy: Designing, Learning and Emergent Ecological Perception'.


The tube map was used to display the relationship between disciplinary traditions within the intensely transdisciplinary research...


More information at the infographic link.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Energy Needs

Energy Needs | green infographics | Scoop.it

"Welcome to Energy Realities, a visual guide to global energy needs, which shows how technology and intelligence are ensuring humanity continues to progress. The site combines maps, multimedia, and writing from three premier publishers and tells the story of energy use, production, sustainability on our planet. We invite you to explore and share this content to help increase understanding and dialogue about our world's energy needs."

 

Energy usage projects to be one of the great geograpical problems of our time.  As ideas such as sustainable economic growth enter the public consciousness, changes to the status quo seem as the more inevitable for the future.  That will the future of consumption look like?  What should it look like?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lauren Moss
Scoop.it!

Green Through The Ages | Visual.ly

Green Through The Ages | Visual.ly | green infographics | Scoop.it
visual.ly - Create, Share, Explore Great Visualizations.
more...
No comment yet.