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green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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Are These Cities Foreshadowing the End of Sprawl?

Are These Cities Foreshadowing the End of Sprawl? | green infographics | Scoop.it
Are Atlanta, Detroit, and Miami set to put car-dependent development in park and pull forward as the new leaders of walkable urban development?

When it comes to discussing sprawl, Atlanta and Detroit have served as poster children for expansive geographic footprints that create driving-dependent lifestyles. However, new research predicts that these two metropolises may now be representative of the cities transitioning from sprawl-based development to walkable urbanism, signaling a major shift in development and lifestyle patterns. The report, "Foot Traffic Ahead: Ranking Walkable Urbanism in America's Largest Metros" predicts that if current development trends continue, cities such as Atlanta, Detroit, and Miami will bound from the bottom third of the list, where they currently reside, to the top 10 metropolises for walkable urban places...

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How Weather Forecasts Can Help Optimize Energy Usage

How Weather Forecasts Can Help Optimize Energy Usage | green infographics | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have been exploring how using public weather forecast information can help deliver significant reductions in energy consumption.


Combining information from the Bureau of Meteorology with data from existing building management systems, the researchers have developed an intelligent model that remains one step ahead of the building’s temperature changes, automatically adjusting the heating and cooling supply accordingly.

Early experimental results have provided encouraging results, with at least 10 per cent energy savings shown to be possible.

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More Than 800,000 Scientific Papers In One Beautiful Infographic

More Than 800,000 Scientific Papers In One Beautiful Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

ArXiv is an online archive that stores hundreds of thousands of scientific papers in physics, mathematics, and other fields. The citations in those papers link to one another, forming a web, but you're not going to see those connections just by sifting through the archive.

So physicist Damien George and Ph.D student Rob Knegjens took it on themselves to create Paperscape, an interactive infographic that beautifully and intuitively charts the papers.

The infographic is a mass of circles. Each circle represents a paper, and the bigger a circle is, the more highly cited it is. The papers are color-coded by discipline--pink for astrophysics, yellow for math, etc.--and papers that share many of the same citations are placed closer together.

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Jay Ratcliff's curator insight, September 6, 2013 1:35 PM

This is cool!  It is like the map of the Internet done last year sometime.

I lucked out and found the section about SNA in the lower left hand side of the map.  Look for Network under the Quantitative Finance section, go figure.

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The true cost of water

The true cost of water | green infographics | Scoop.it

The market’s perverse water pricing creates opportunities for businesses that look beyond the market and consider the true cost of H20.

The environmental and social costs of global business water use add up to around $1.9 trillion per year, according to new research.

Some of these external water costs already are being internalized and hitting bottom lines: Just last year, the worst drought in the United States in 50 years sent commodity prices skyrocketing. Companies, especially those in the food, beverage and apparel sectors whose margins and supply chains are tightly linked to agricultural commodities, can use the true cost of water to get ahead of the trend of external costs increasingly being internalized through regulations, pricing or shortages...

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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, May 18, 2013 7:06 PM

Understanding the true costs of resources, and accounting for these costs, is critical to realistically reaching the goal of Zero Footprint.

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The Happiest Cities in the World [Infographic]

The Happiest Cities in the World [Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Happiness is a fleeting commodity in reality, it comes and goes, but the perception of happiness is the real bottom-line driver for cities and their branding.


What makes urban dwellers happy? According to a 10,000 respondent, 20 country research effort from GfK Custom Research, it is a location-based perception: does your city offer you places to go that make you happy? Apparently, the perception-reality gap is what is really interesting the city governments. Happiness is a fleeting commodity in reality, it comes and goes, but the perception of happiness is the real bottom-line driver for cities and their branding.

The winning locations end up being quite obvious candidates; entertainment and cultural heavyweights, beautiful urban areas and laid-back lifestyles lead the march...

See more statistics and data at the infographic and article link.

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bancoideas's curator insight, March 4, 2013 9:51 AM

Ciudades felices y ciudades inteligentes son #ideas que siempre deben ir de la mano #smartcities, no te pierdas esta #inforgrafía

Mercor's curator insight, March 4, 2013 10:40 AM

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Infographic: America's Fresh Food Movement

Infographic: America's Fresh Food Movement | green infographics | Scoop.it

According to a 2012 survey, 87% of U.S. consumers agree that they eat more whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables now that they did five years ago.

Amidst high-profile medical research proving the healthfulness of these types of food, as well as a subsequent backlash against processed, consumer-packaged goods, the American public is taking note of where the food's coming from. More are seeking fresh produce at their grocery stores and farmers' markets. Some are even growing it in their backyards. What other trends are occurring, and what is most important to consumers?

Find out more about healthy eating at Good's Food hub: good.is/food.


Via Flora Moon
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Infographic: Companies unprepared to address resource scarcities

Infographic:  Companies unprepared to address resource scarcities | green infographics | Scoop.it
New research shows that many businesses around the world won’t start planning until 2018. Is this too late?

Despite widespread warnings of resource scarcity over the next few decades, a significant proportion of global businesses are not prepared to address the predicted shortfall, according to new research by Carbon Trust.
The U.K.-based organization’s survey of 475 executives in the U.S., Brazil, China, Korea and the U.K. revealed while a majority acknowledged that their companies would have to charge more for their products and services as a result of resource constraints, 43 percent are not monitoring risks posed by incidents such as energy price increases and environmental disasters. Over 50 percent have not developed goals to reduce their company’s consumption of water, waste production or carbon emissions...

View the Carbon Trust infographic for more details on the survey.
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Duane Craig's curator insight, December 20, 2012 11:19 AM

And, the construction sector is woefully unprepared...

Jim Gramata's curator insight, December 21, 2012 10:37 PM

The earth is bounded and its resources finite. Hopefully it will be a proactive and not reactive decision to do what is critical to the sustainability of the earth. Spread the word....

Mercor's curator insight, January 31, 2013 9:50 AM

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Guide to Greener Electronics [Greenpeace]

Guide to Greener Electronics [Greenpeace] | green infographics | Scoop.it
Consumers have expressed their desire for greener electronics, and the industry has shown that improvements are possible, but only if leading electronics companies apply the sector’s know-how and innovative spirit within the sustainability arena.


This 18th edition of Greenpeace’s Guide to Greener Electronics evaluates leading consumer electronics companies based on their commitment and progress in three environmental criteria: Energy and Climate, Greener Products, and Sustainable Operations. The Guide scores companies on overall policies and practices – not on specific products – to provide consumers with a snapshot of the sustainability of the biggest names in the industry.


Learn more about green electronics and the latest rankings at the link...

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An Infographic Breakdown Of The World's Greenest Cities

An Infographic Breakdown Of The World's Greenest Cities | green infographics | Scoop.it

This infographic focuses on the cities of London, New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, and Stockholm.


It’s hard to quantify what makes a city "greener" than any other metropolis, but there are some clues: car ownership, green space, bicycle usage, solar installations, recycling, and water consumption are just a few factors that create environmentally responsible cities.

An infographic from HouseTrip lays out what different cities are doing in an easy-to-read format. A handful of major world cities stand out as leaders. This infographic focuses on London, New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, and Stockholm; three of these cities made it into our top 10 smart cities list (two others were runners-up). Each of these cities have statistics worth mentioning. Amsterdam has one bike for every 0.73 people, Copenhagen has legislation requiring all new buildings to have green roofs (this will add 5,000 square meters of vegetation), and only 44% of New Yorkers own a car, compared to 95% of Americans overall.


Visit the link to view the full infographic and to read more about the specific elements that make each featured city 'green'...

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Global Warming: a new report on loss of life and global economic damage

Global Warming: a new report on loss of life and global economic damage | green infographics | Scoop.it

From devastating floods in China and the Philippines to droughts in Africa, the extreme weather patterns that hit the United States have impacted sites around the world as the face of global warming.

According to a new report, climate change has already contributed to 400,000 deaths per year and over $699 billion, 0.9 percent annually, in loss to gross domestic product (GDP). The report estimates even greater damage from air pollution caused by the burning of fossil fuels. also driving global warming.

'Climate Vulnerability Monitor: A Guide to the Cold Calculus of a Hot Planet (2nd Edition)' was written by over 50 scientists, economists and policy experts, and commissioned by 20 governments. The study calculates and compares the vulnerability of 184 countries in terms of environmental disasters, habitat change, health impact and industry stress.

Read on for statistics, implications and global health issues related to these new findings, proving that 'failing to deal with global warming will have real and lasting impacts on local communities, economies, health and safety, and people around the world.'

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What is the cost of climate change to our oceans?

What is the cost of climate change to our oceans? | green infographics | Scoop.it
A study claims to show how climate change could cost the marine economy trillions of dollars per year, but how can you cost the oceans?

Scientists in Sweden claim climate change could cause almost $2tn of damage per year through marine impacts alone by 2100 if emissions continue to rise at current rates.

Valuing the Ocean, a study by the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) is due to be published in June this year and has assigned monetary values to five categories of ocean services in a bid to establish an objective calculation for the costs of climate change to the marine economy.

The study uses one high- and one low-emissions scenario as defined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to show how quick and concerted efforts to minimise global warming could lead to savings of $1.37tn per year - or 0.25% or projected global GDP - by 2100...

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Imagining a City Without Its Public Transportation

Imagining a City Without Its Public Transportation | green infographics | Scoop.it
Antos, a WMATA transportation analyst, has for the last several months been managing a study [PDF] that makes the business case for transit in the D.C. area. The agency tried to isolate the actual impact of rail lines on economic development, property values and tax revenues in the immediate vicinity around each station (they conservatively estimate that Metrorail boosts the value of property within a half mile of stations by about seven to nine percent).

But they also modeled what the region would look like if its transit never existed. And this is where things get really interesting.

WMATA took the same transportation demand model that it uses to project ridership on a new line and instead ran a couple of scenarios with the region’s transit literally turned off. All of it: the regional rail, the buses and the metro system.

"It was literally just imagining Washington, and all of a sudden, you wake up tomorrow, and the transit system isn’t there," Antos says. "What would you do?"

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Research: Mapping the Impact of Traffic on the Livability of Streets

Research: Mapping the Impact of Traffic on the Livability of Streets | green infographics | Scoop.it
More automobile traffic = Fewer friends.

Looking at the social effects of traffic and neighborhood layout, and the analysis of peoples' environmental perceptions.

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If you build it, they will come: New study shows that bike lanes increase ridership

If you build it, they will come: New study shows that bike lanes increase ridership | green infographics | Scoop.it
When people feel safer they are more likely to ride a bike, and they feel safer in bike lanes.

The idea of "vehicular cycling", where cyclists share the road with cars and act like cars, is looking sillier with every new study. A few weeks ago a study showed that a shocking 40% of cycling deaths happened when a cyclist was rear ended, usually on arterial roads. Now a new study, Lessons from the Green Lanes, provides clear evidence that separated bike lanes work really well, not only at saving lives, but in attracting more cyclists, making cyclists feel safer, and increasing economic activity.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 6, 6:59 AM

Strategies to create sustainable urban places

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COP 19 conference: a key step in the fight against climate change

COP 19 conference: a key step in the fight against climate change | green infographics | Scoop.it

Sea levels and air temperatures continue to rise according to studies, which is expected to lead to more floods and worse heat waves. To help prevent this, the 19th UN Climate Conference takes place this month to discuss how to curb carbon emissions after 2020, including key steps towards a new globally binding agreement by 2015. Check out the infographic on climate change for more information.

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, November 9, 2013 3:50 PM

Will we be in time? What should we do to prepare to protect ourselves?

Jenny Byrne's curator insight, November 10, 2013 12:37 AM

it's true, a picture is worth a thousand words

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Imagining A Future City Filled With Driverless Cars And Without Any Parking Spaces

Imagining A Future City Filled With Driverless Cars And Without Any Parking Spaces | green infographics | Scoop.it

As self-driving cars move from fantasy to reality, what kind of effect will they have on cities?

A research and urban prototyping project called Shuffle City investigates, and in the process, becomes a manifesto for a new kind of modern city--one that depends less on traditional public transportation like buses or light rail and more on creating a fleet of continuously moving automated vehicles to serve urban mobility needs.

Shuffle City looks at the new possibilities that could arise from cities transitioning to cars without drivers. If cars were put into some constant flow as a public good, and if people didn’t all have their own vehicles, there would be no need for the concrete wastelands and lifeless towers that serve as a parking infrastructure in the urban landscapes of car-centric cities like Phoenix and Los Angeles (Under the current ownership model, the average car spends 21 hours per day parked.)

The share of city space ruled by parking lots will shrink, making way for more green space, environmental buffers, workspace, housing, retail, and denser planning for more walkable cities...

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José Antônio Carlos - O Professor Pepe's curator insight, August 7, 2013 8:41 AM

Um desenho da cidade de nossos sonhos. Carros sem motoristas, ruas sem espaço para estacionamento, e por aí vai.

Kim Spence-Jones's curator insight, August 8, 2013 2:53 AM

Interface between cars and homes is an interesting area of R&D. Everything from entertainment synchronising to battery management.

miguel sa's curator insight, September 4, 2013 4:17 PM

Jacque Fresco has been talking about this sort of thing for awhile now, looks like its coming closer to reality~ 

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11,000 Years' Worth of Climate Data

11,000 Years' Worth of Climate Data | green infographics | Scoop.it

New research takes the deepest dive ever into historic climate records.


Back in 1999 Penn State climate scientist Michael Mann released the climate change movement's most potent symbol: The "hockey stick," a line graph of global temperature over the last 1,500 years that shows an unmistakable, massive uptick in the twentieth century when humans began to dump large amounts of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. It's among the most compelling bits of proof out there that human beings are behind global warming, and as such has become a target on Mann's back for climate denialists looking to draw a bead on scientists.


Now it's gotten a makeover: A study published in Science reconstructs global temperatures further back than ever before -- a full 11,300 years. The new analysis finds that the only problem with Mann's hockey stick was that its handle was about 9,000 years too short...

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Why a Four Degree Celsius Warmer World Must Be Avoided: Infographic

Why a Four Degree Celsius Warmer World Must Be Avoided: Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

The World Bank has issued a new report on global warming entitled 'Turn Down the Heat: Why a 4 Degree C Warmer World Must Be Avoided.'


Why should we avoid it?

Because it would be verging on apocalyptic. Coral reefs dead, rainforests dead, sections of the tropics becoming uninhabitable due to heat, spreading deserts, ice sheets collapsing, rising sea levels inundating cities and entire countries. The infographic below tries to be optimistic, but it is best to know the truth: we are currently a ship of fools sailing for planetary-scale disaster.

The lack of political will is leading to a situation in which we are being forced into the geoengineering option, because the technical solution, no matter how crazy it is, is not as difficult as the moral-political solution...

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Norm Miller's curator insight, January 22, 2013 5:01 PM

If the US Federal Government can not agree on fiscal reforms, what makes anyone think that longer term problems like global warming can be addressed with sufficient advanced planning to avert global warming.  We are probably not going to do anything sufficient to reverse this invitable trend, so why not simply accept the consequences and deal with them as a given?  Low lying lands will be gone, so don't buy any beachfront property not on a cliff.  Farming will need to adapt.  Our microorganisms will hopefully adapt.  We will likely have some food crisis but we do have the technology to handle many problems, and things will be easier if we start to wean ourselves off of carbon based fuels.  Many cities will be gone but I don't see it as the end of the world. 

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Environmental Data Mapped: Ecosystem Stress in the Great Lakes

Environmental Data Mapped:  Ecosystem Stress in the Great Lakes | green infographics | Scoop.it

A first-of-its-kind map that pulls together numerical data on nearly three dozen factors that affect the Great Lakes ecosystem shows that the lakes with the most urban and agricultural development in their watersheds are also those with the greatest environmental stress.


Lakes Erie and Ontario, the easternmost lakes, are challenged by high coastal population densities, an industrial legacy and phosphorous pollution from agricultural runoff. They are also downstream from wind currents that drop nitrogen generated by industries and power plants into their waters.

But the map’s patches of high-stress red and yellow should not be misinterpreted. The color scale is a relative measure that compares the combined stress of the 34 environmental indicators in a particular area to the stress level of the lake system as a whole.


To create the maps, the research team queried some 160 experts from universities, nonprofits and government agencies in the United States and Canada and compiled a list of 50 key biological, chemical or physical indicators, of which two-thirds had data sufficient enough to be plotted.

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Climate Change and Human Responsibility

Climate Change and Human Responsibility | green infographics | Scoop.it
It can’t be denied any longer: Sea levels are rising, major droughts are continuing, and record hot summers are being experienced all around the world. Climate change is real and, as residents of Earth, we have a responsibility to our planet to do something about it. A recent study conducted by Yale University and George Mason University finds that, for the first time since the research began in 2008, the majority of Americans believe that global warming is mostly a man-made phenomenon.

As sobering images of catastrophes are making headlines, this graphic looks at how people are recognizing that the effects of their actions aren’t just an increasing danger to the world but are a direct threat to the future for themselves and their families.
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Jim Gramata's curator insight, December 14, 2012 2:35 PM

Decisions have consequences. In some cases irreversible and significant. Changing Tides....great post

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Infographic: Climate Change and Human Responsibility

Infographic: Climate Change and Human Responsibility | green infographics | Scoop.it

It can't be denied any longer: Sea levels are rising, major droughts are continuing, and record hot summers are being experienced al around the world.

A recent study conducted by Yale University and George Mason University finds that for the first time since the research began in 2008, the majority of Americans believe that global warming is mostly a man-made phenomenon. And as sobering images of catastrophes make headlines, people are recognizing that the effects of their actions are not just an increasing danger to the world but a direct threat to themselves and their families.

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Eco-Literacy Map | Visual.ly

Eco-Literacy Map | Visual.ly | green infographics | Scoop.it

'The Visual Communication of Ecological Literacy: Designing, Learning and Emergent Ecological Perception'.


The tube map was used to display the relationship between disciplinary traditions within the intensely transdisciplinary research...


More information at the infographic link.

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Climate Change at the Neighborhood Level

Climate Change at the Neighborhood Level | green infographics | Scoop.it
Researchers in Los Angeles try out a more granular approach to temperature change estimates.

Most climate maps break down the world into grid squares 200 kilometers wide. That's great for creating a regional picture, but too big for what's happening at the city & neighborhood levels. New work coming out of the UCLA Dept of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences greatly improves that resolution, predicting temperature changes in grid sections just two km wide in the Los Angeles region.

The new report, 'Mid-Century Warming in the Los Angeles Region' finds that climate change will likely affect some parts of Los Angeles more heavily than others, with potential temperature increases of between 1.7 and 7.5 degrees F. Inland areas and places at high elevation are predicted to see temperatures rise 20 to 50 percent more than areas near the coast or within the L.A. basin.

This more method of evaluation is an important tool for planners and policymakers, who would like to have more precise information about how to respond to changing temperature levels within cities, and ideally, to pinpoint efforts aimed at reducing those potential impacts...

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New York City Energy Use All Over the Map

New York City Energy Use All Over the Map | green infographics | Scoop.it
New York City’s appetite for energy is immense, making it a revealing case study for how people use — and waste — energy.

“Midtown Manhattan has more energy use than the whole country of Kenya, and New York state uses more energy than all of sub-Saharan Africa,” said Vijay Modi, a professor of mechanical engineering at Columbia University. “There is just this intense use of energy in cities like New York.”

A new project by Modi and graduate student Bianca Howard aims to put the city’s energy consumption on the map. The results of their work are displayed on an interactive map estimating the total annual energy consumption for nearly every building across the five boroughs.

Their research allows New Yorkers to get a rough idea of how much energy is used inside their homes, offices and businesses — and it offers a peek into the building next door, down the street and across the city. The goal of the project is to take some of the mystery out of energy usage..

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Anatomy of a Smart City

Anatomy of a Smart City | green infographics | Scoop.it

The 19th century was a century of empires, 20th century was a century of nation states and the 21st century will be a century of cities...

This outstanding infographic (courtesy of postscapes.com) begins with some information about our current state of urbanization.

Did you know that 1.3 million people are moving to cities each week?! It then explains the need for smart cities and delves into what is required to establish these intelligent connected environments, how the smart city may take various forms in the developing worlds and what specific technologies are necessary to achieve such grand goals in practice.

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Christian Allié's comment, August 8, 2013 6:20 AM
"« Le 21ème siècle sera spirituel ou ne sera pas »
"The 21st century will be spiritual or will not"
http://lespoir.jimdo.com/2012/08/31/le-21%C3%A8me-si%C3%A8cle-sera-spirituel-ou-ne-sera-pas/
About cities too........may be !
Margarida Sá Costa's curator insight, August 8, 2013 11:27 AM

cities of the future....future new human political organizations?

Grd Lyon-millenaire3's comment, August 19, 2013 6:06 AM
It supposes an organization at the world level but which and with whom? Doubtless adds us in a transitional period. The best is yet to come.