green infographics
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green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
Curated by Lauren Moss
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The World’s Congested Human Migration Routes in 5 Maps

The World’s Congested Human Migration Routes in 5 Maps | green infographics | Scoop.it

"The desperate men, women, and children flooding into Europe from the Middle East and Africa are not the only people moving along ever-shifting and dangerous migration routes. Last year saw the highest levels of global forced displacement on record—59.5 million individuals left their homes in 2014 due to 'persecution, conflict, generalized violence, or human rights violations' according to the United Nations. That's 8.3 million more people than the year before."


Via Seth Dixon
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Matthieu CLEMENT's curator insight, September 25, 2015 12:25 AM

Pour compléter et prolonger un petit peu notre dossier sur la crise des réfugiés en Europe. A analyser  une série de cartes dans l'article aux différentes échelles régionales.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 1, 2015 4:14 AM

The World’s Congested Human Migration Routes in 5 Maps

DigitalDimension's curator insight, December 11, 2016 5:39 PM
Os dejamos esta interesante pieza de National Geographic...
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Income Inequality: It’s Also Bad for Your Health

Income Inequality: It’s Also Bad for Your Health | green infographics | Scoop.it
A study found that in places with more unevenness of income, life spans were shorter.

We know that living in a poor community makes you less likely to live a long life. New evidence suggests that living in a community with high income inequality also seems to be bad for your health.

A study from researchers at the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute examined a series of risk factors that help explain the health (or sickness) of counties in the United States. In addition to the suspects you might expect — a high smoking rate, a lot of violent crime — the researchers found that people in unequal communities were more likely to die before the age of 75 than people in more equal communities, even if the average incomes were the same.

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The Most and Least Expensive States for Energy Costs

The Most and Least Expensive States for Energy Costs | green infographics | Scoop.it
EcoBuilding Pulse's interactive heat map displays how each state ranks for total energy costs, and breaksdown average electric, natural gas, and fuel costs from WalletHub's "Most and Least Energy Expensive States" report.
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The Most Bike-Friendly States In The U.S.

The Most Bike-Friendly States In The U.S. | green infographics | Scoop.it

Washington, Minnesota, and Wisconsin are the best states for cycling in the United States. Alabama, Montana, and Kentucky are the worst. States like Florida and New York fall somewhere in the middle.

That's according to The League of American Bicyclists, which every year ranks states on their friendliness to cycling. Washington keeps its No. 1 status from last year, with Wisconsin moving up five places. Montana has dropped 10 places to 49th. Meanwhile, California and Ohio are the most improved from 2013. The latter state is up 16 places, from 32nd to 16th.

Find more deatils at the link or see the full report and methodology here.

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A Map of History's Biggest Greenhouse Gas Polluters

A Map of History's Biggest Greenhouse Gas Polluters | green infographics | Scoop.it

A select few countries have been responsible for the majority of the world's CO2 emissions since the '70s.

To know the biggest CO2 spewers in recent history, have a look at these animated maps from the Paris-based data designer "JeremY Boy." They show the countries responsible for the bulk of emissions since 1971, with pulsating, foul-looking clouds each representing 300 million tonnes of C02. Note that some countries are left blank due to missing or incomplete information (certain governments don't accurately track bunker fuels, for instance), and that the data refers only to emissions from burning fossil fuels, not smaller sources like incinerating waste materials.

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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, March 29, 2014 9:34 AM

But while emissions are a global problem, the blame for producing them is not. A few countries have been disproportionately responsible for clouding the air with climate-bending gases. And though they may have cleaned up their act in recent years, significant damage has already been done.

 
Suggested by PIRatE Lab
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A Map of the Top 50 Markets for Efficient Lightbulb Sales Across the U.S.

A Map of the Top 50 Markets for Efficient Lightbulb Sales Across the U.S. | green infographics | Scoop.it
Since January 1st, 2014, there's been a renewed interest in energy-efficient lighting thanks to a law that requires a minimum level of efficiency from lightbulbs, making the century-old incandescents a thing of the past.

There's still about 70% of light sockets in the US that contain energy-inefficient lightbulbs, so the potential gains are huge. And with long-lived and very efficient LEDs dropping in price quickly, there's no excuses to stick with antiquated technology.

This map was compiled based on sales data from the biggest lightbulb seller in the US, combining sales numbers for a per capita look at which areas of the country are the top adopters of LED and compact fluorescent (CFL) bulbs.

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United States Carbon Emissions: An Interactive Heat Map & New Research

United States Carbon Emissions: An Interactive Heat Map & New Research | green infographics | Scoop.it

When it comes to carbon emissions, don’t blame big cities -- blame the suburbs, says a new study from the University of California, Berkeley. The study, released Monday, found that population-dense cities contribute less greenhouse-gas emissions per person than other areas of the United States. However, these cities’ suburbs are so damaging to the environment that they effectively wipe out any climate benefits. The study will be published in science journal Environmental Science & Technology.


Using dozens of variables, researchers found that greenhouse-gas emissions -- largely from cars, trucks and other vehicles -- in the suburbs account for about 50 percent of all household emissions in the nation, even though less than 50 percent of the population lives in these areas.

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Top 10 Countries With LEED-Certified Projects | EcoWatch

Top 10 Countries With LEED-Certified Projects | EcoWatch | green infographics | Scoop.it

A new report from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) contains all the numbers and rankings a green building advocate could want to know regarding Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) projects in the U.S. and beyond.


LEED in Motion: Places and Policies highlights projects around the globe and the impact the green building set of standards made in the 13 years since it was created. LEED’s expansion has been massive, as about 40 percent of the properties that are pursing registration and/or certification are located outside of the U.S.

There are nearly 60,000 LEED green building projects in the world, spanning 10.6 billion square feet. Canada, India, China, the United Arab Emirates and Brazil are the countries with the most LEED projects outside of the U.S.

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Tour the Country’s Energy Infrastructure Through A New Interactive Map

Tour the Country’s Energy Infrastructure Through A New Interactive Map | green infographics | Scoop.it

Examining the network of power plants, transmission wires, and pipelines gives new insights into the inner workings of the electrical grid.


Every time you switch on a light, charge your electronics or heat your home in the winter, you’re relying upon a tremendous network of energy infrastructure that literally stretches across the country: power plants, pipelines, transmission wires and storage facilities.

It can be hard to visualize all this infrastructure and understand how it makes abundant energy available throughout the country. To help see a bigger picture, a new map, just released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, combines a range of data (locations of power plants, electricity lines, natural gas pipelines, refineries, storage facilities and more) into an elegant, interactive interface that helps to piece how it all fits together. You can also zoom in on your own city to see the types of power plants generating electricity nearby.

The map also includes layers of real-time information on storm movement and risks, allowing energy analysts to better understand the potential impact of storms.

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Norm Miller's curator insight, July 30, 2013 1:32 PM

Understanding the grid in real time is somewhat facilitated by this new interactive map.

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Data Visualization: Explore the United States of Energy

Data Visualization: Explore the United States of Energy | green infographics | Scoop.it

Finally… After almost 50 years of dependence on foreign sources to meet our growing energy needs, our country is finally in a position to begin reversing the trend. Through advances in drilling technology, discoveries of new oil and natural gas reserves and swift progress in the renewables sector, the United States is setting a course for energy self-sufficiency.

The complex story of energy in America and making it relevant to an increasingly distracted public remains one of our biggest challenges as energy industry communicators. In the information economy, there’s a lot of loose change. Content that lacks context. A rapidly growing punditocracy. An immense amount of noise.

Someone has to break through.


In the spirit of this endeavor, we created the United States of Energy map, the first data visualization piece of its kind to comprehensively detail our nation’s vast and diverse energy portfolio...

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An Integrated Perspective: the 2013 Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report

An Integrated Perspective: the 2013 Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report | green infographics | Scoop.it
The new Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report ranks energy systems of 105 countries from an integrated economic, environmental and energy security perspective.

The findings reveal that high-income countries have proven best at managing the transition to a new energy architecture. Norway ranks in first place in the index, where a strong energy policy coupled with multiple energy resources has delivered cheap, plentiful and relatively clean power and generated large national revenues.
However, the index also finds that high-income and rapidly growing countries alike often underperform across a wide range of environmental sustainability metrics. With demand for energy rapidly increasing at the same time as some nations are reconsidering costly renewable obligations and CO2 targets, the report calls for affirmative action to address this.
Lauren Moss's insight:

For a visual representation of the statistics, visit the link at the article for the report's interactive map, ranking countries on a numerical scale on the following categories:

  • overall performance
  • economic growth and development
  • environmental sustainability
  • energy access and security
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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, December 11, 2012 8:39 PM

The scale and complexity of the global energy industry demands a country-by-country approach to managing change,” said Arthur Hanna, Managing Director, Energy Industry, Accenture, and a Member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on New Energy Architecture. “The Energy Architecture Performance Index helps nations take stock of their energy architecture challenges and identify specific focus areas coupled with best-in-class examples to use when managing their transition.

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Storm-Surge Flood Zones | Visual.ly

Storm-Surge Flood Zones | Visual.ly | green infographics | Scoop.it

This interactive map shows the potential storm-surge flooding by hurricane size, by classification/catagory. Actual flooding may vary due to storm variables or data errors. Flooding from rain not included.

Note: Heed official advisories, not this map, for life and property decisions...

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Eco-Literacy Map | Visual.ly

Eco-Literacy Map | Visual.ly | green infographics | Scoop.it

'The Visual Communication of Ecological Literacy: Designing, Learning and Emergent Ecological Perception'.


The tube map was used to display the relationship between disciplinary traditions within the intensely transdisciplinary research...


More information at the infographic link.

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By 2050, the Greenest City May Not Be in the First World

By 2050, the Greenest City May Not Be in the First World | green infographics | Scoop.it
Cities might be burning three times more energy in 2050 than they did in 2005—unless they act now.

Currently, more than half of the world’s people live in cities. Given the trend of jobs returning to urban centers, it may not be surprising that by 2030 the world’s cities will be home to 60 percent of the world’s population. Cities are adapting to accommodate the growing population by becoming sustainable and green.

Yet assuming that the current rapid pace of population growth continues, cities will be burning three times more energy per capita in 2050 than they did in 2005 despite their “green” efforts. Even with increasing favor toward public transport in the first world’s largest cities, the cities with the greatest opportunity to reduce energy use are those in the still-developing second world, particularly in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.

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Mapping Los Angeles's Better But Still Terrible Air Quality

Mapping Los Angeles's Better But Still Terrible Air Quality | green infographics | Scoop.it

Though the persistent brown halo around Downtown might suggest otherwise, the amount of cancer-causing toxins in the Los Angeles basin air has fallen 65 percent since 2005, says a new report out from the South Coast Air Quality Management District. Don't breathe too deeply yet. Despite the improvement, "The levels still occurring here in Southern California are too high and need to be further reduced," an executive officer of the SCAQMD tells the Daily News.

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State-by-State Temperature Map: Red-Hot Out West

State-by-State Temperature Map: Red-Hot Out West | green infographics | Scoop.it

Take a look at this year's temperatures by state. California was five degrees warmer than its 20th-century average, whereas Michigan and Mississippi experienced near record cold. 

That is to say, climate change doesn't mean it will never be cold again, but it does mean that when a heat wave hits, it is more likely to be more extreme than the ones preceding it. "It is very likely that heat waves will be more intense, more frequent and longer lasting in a future warmer climate," the Intergovernmetnal Panel on Climate Change wrote back in 2007.

Any individual weather event or pattern can't be blamed directly on the atmospheric changes caused by burning fossil fuels. But if we ask the question a little bit differently, we can discern a climate trend: how likely is it that California would be experiencing the kind of heat we've seen without the human influence on the climate? It might happen, but it'd be very, very unlikely.

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Map: Is There a Risky Chemical Plant Near You?

Map: Is There a Risky Chemical Plant Near You? | green infographics | Scoop.it

Millions of Americans live near a site that could put them in harm's way if hazardous chemicals leak or catch fire. The Environmental Protection Agency monitors roughly 12,000 facilities that store one or more of 140 toxic or flammable chemicals that are potentially hazardous to nearby communities.

The interactive map, based on data from the EPA's Risk Management Program, shows at least 9,000 facilities where a "catastrophic chemical release" or what the EPA calls a "worst-case scenario" could harm nearby residents. At the link, hover over any site to see its exact location, the chemicals it stores, and how many accidents it documented in its most recent 5-year reporting period. 

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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, April 20, 2014 9:52 AM

Good to be informed.

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Google's Next Goal: To Stop Deforestation with Global Forest Watch

Google's Next Goal: To Stop Deforestation with Global Forest Watch | green infographics | Scoop.it

Deforestation has long been cited as a problem, but a lack of accessible data meant that the general public had to take someone's word for the figures. As a result, its threat always seemed more abstract and nebulous than, say, climate change or rising sea levels.


Until now: Google has unveiled its Global Forest Watch, an online tool that monitors deforestation around the world in near-real time.

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Antonio Lopez's curator insight, February 28, 2014 6:05 AM

One role of media should be to act like those speed monitors we see that tell us how fast we are going. Hopefully a program like Google's Global Forest Watch can help us monitor deforestation in real time.

thinking peasant's curator insight, February 28, 2014 6:51 AM

maybe they have not gone over to the dark side for good?

Daniel LaLiberte's comment, March 10, 2014 11:59 AM
Another writeup at: http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-26287137
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Google Highlights Global Deforestation with Interactive Map

Google Highlights Global Deforestation with Interactive Map | green infographics | Scoop.it

Google earth has partnered with a research team at the University of Maryland in the realization of an interactive, digital map that highlights global deforestation.

The data used has been compiled from the results of a decade long analysis of 654,178 landsat images. each color indication on the interface corresponds to collected informational evidence: red -- forest loss from 2000-2012; blue -- forest gain from 2000-2012; magenta -- both loss and gain; green -- forest extent.

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, January 15, 2014 8:28 AM

Will we be in time to turn around the amount of deforestation on the earth to stop the destruction?

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New Interactive Map Estimates Solar Potential For D.C. Buildings

New Interactive Map Estimates Solar Potential For D.C. Buildings | green infographics | Scoop.it

Have you ever wondered what the solar potential of your home is? Or where you work? Or the White House maybe?


A new interactive map commissioned by the District Department of the Environment and created by Mapdwell allows users to click on almost any building in the city and see "how much electricity can be produced on their rooftops from solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, how the financial investment will pay off, and how much pollution will be reduced." You can also see where solar systems are already installed and what the yearly financial benefit is.

The data used to create the map comes from the Army's Light Detection and Ranging (Lidar) system, aerial imagery from the D.C. Geographic Information System and building footprints from EarthData International, Inc. Mapdwell is "a collaborative effort by researchers, academics, and professionals at MIT."

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Bertrand Auzemery's curator insight, December 18, 2013 3:12 AM

Potentiel solaire de nos toits

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Visualizing 100 Years Of Climate Data

Visualizing 100 Years Of Climate Data | green infographics | Scoop.it

What does 100 years worth of climate data look like when rendered in an interactive, color-coded map? A continental tug-of-war between red (for heat) and blue (for cold), as seasons come and go and cold air replaces the warm.

The infographic is the work of data visualization studio Halftone, whose principals originally pursued the idea of making a map to visualize data about coffee production against key environmental factors, like temperature and precipitation.


"Our goal with this project was not to facilitate precise analysis, but to expose how every single month produces a unique and beautiful artwork through our Voronoi tessellated approximation of a heat map," write the creators. "The underlying map of satellite imagery and major geographic features adds a second layer for exploration."

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NOAA's new interactive map shows all the vegetation on the planet

NOAA's new interactive map shows all the vegetation on the planet | green infographics | Scoop.it

Thanks to the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite, NOAA has put together an incredible interactive map of the world's greenery, we can now see to an amazing degree of detail which parts of the planet is covered in green and which are bare.

The map is thanks to the ability of the satellite to collect 2 TB of data every week -- and that's only the portion of data collected for the vegetation index...

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alistairm 's curator insight, June 24, 2013 3:54 AM

I'm hoping we'll see seasonal changes too! Great potential for looking at conservation issues, biodiversity, urban encroachment etc

Steve Mattison's curator insight, July 19, 2013 9:36 AM

It is a lot greener than you would think considering all the slash and burn hype the media puts out.

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Global Gouging: A Survey of Fuel Prices Around the World

Global Gouging: A Survey of Fuel Prices Around the World | green infographics | Scoop.it

In spite of increasing domestic oil production, four-dollar-per-gallon gasoline remains an on-again/off-again reality in the United States.


That’s because oil and gas are global commodities, and the U.S. market isn’t as insular as we might like. The prices we pay, however, still stand out as cheap. Most of our global neighbors see fuel prices at the pump so high that even the most bumptious Texas oilman would blush. We’ve assembled the costs of a gallon of the most popular juice in every country we could—be it leaded crud in Ghana, sugar-derived ethanol in Brazil, or near avgas in Bahrain—based on the most recent data available...


Check out some of the pricing highs and lows on the dimensional map of fuel prices around the world.

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PowerPoint & Keynote Solutions from Chillibreeze's curator insight, January 5, 2013 7:51 PM

This is kind an infomap. Notice how fuel prices are indicated for each country. I will continue  searching for examples of maps that communicate.

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Global Climate at Risk as Nearly 1,200 New Coal Plants Proposed [interactive infographic]

Global Climate at Risk as Nearly 1,200 New Coal Plants Proposed [interactive infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

The World Resources Institute (WRI) released a report, Global Coal Risk Assessment, that analyzes information about proposed new coal-fired plants and other market trends in order to assess potential future risks to the global climate.

The report finds that there are 1,199 new coal power plants in the works, totaling more than 1.4 million megawatts of capacity worldwide. That’s four times the capacity of all the coal-fired power plants in the U.S. Seventy-six percent of the coal plants are proposed for India and China, with the U.S. seventh in the world for coal power plants in development.
According to the WRI, if all of these projects are built, it would add new coal power capacity that is almost four times the current capacity of all coal-fired plants in the U.S.


View the locations of proposed coal-fired power plants by country in this interactive map at the article link.

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Living portrait of a storm – a live data visualization of Sandy

Living portrait of a storm – a live data visualization of Sandy | green infographics | Scoop.it

Sitting in London, our thoughts are with all those suffering the devastating effects of Storm Sandy in the US and elsewhere.

For those anxious to track its chaos, this fascinating live data visualisation created by Fernanda Vegas and Martin Wattenberg on HINT.FM represents the destructive force of nature in all its complexity. The Wind Map was created as a “living portrait of the wind currents over the U.S,” which artfully reflects the weather patterns and their emotional impact on our lives.


To find out more about the impact of Storm Sandy visit The New York Times microsite which assesses the damage with data visualisations alongside images of the impact taken at the worst-hit areas...

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