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creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
Curated by Lauren Moss
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A Terrifying, Fascinating Timelapse of 30 Years of Human Impact on Earth

A Terrifying, Fascinating Timelapse of 30 Years of Human Impact on Earth | green infographics | Scoop.it
A new interactive project from Google, NASA and the US Geological Survey.

Since the 70s, NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey have been amassing satellite images of our planet as part of the Landsat program, revealing a record of change over time: cities expanding, lakes and forests disappearing, new islands emerging off the coast of rising metropolises like Dubai. These historic pictures show stunning change across the earth's surface, in both our natural environments and our man-made ones.


Three decades of global change can be viewed digitally in a recent project between NASA, the USGS, TIME, Google, and theCREATE Lab at Carnegie Mellon. Landsat images taken between 1984 and 2012 have been converted into a seamless, navigable animation built from millions of satellite photos. As Google wrote this morning on its blog: "We believe this is the most comprehensive picture of our changing planet ever made available to the public."


Visit the link for more details and to view a few of the GIFs Google has created showing some of the most startling pockets of change...

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Enrico De Angelis's comment, May 29, 2013 2:15 AM
beautiful, thanks, google!
Rescooped by Lauren Moss from Geography Education
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Stunning Satellite Images of Earth

Stunning Satellite Images of Earth | green infographics | Scoop.it

Of all the cosmic bodies studied in the long history of astronomy and space travel, the one that got the least attention was the one that ought to matter most to us—Earth.

That changed when NASA created the Landsat program, a series of satellites that would perpetually orbit our planet, looking not out but down. Landsat was built for public monitoring of how the human species was altering the surface of the planet. The space agency, along with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), has accumulated a stunning catalog of images that, when riffled through and stitched together, create a high-definition slide show of our rapidly changing Earth, which for the first time date all the way back to 1984.


These Timelapse pictures tell the pretty and not-so-pretty story of a finite planet and how its residents are treating it — razing even as we build, destroying even as we preserve.

Visit the article link to see an exclusive timelapse of climate change, deforestation and urban sprawl unfolding as Earth evolves over 30 years...


Via Seth Dixon
Lauren Moss's insight:

The impact of global urbanization, deforestation, and resource depletion are expressed in dramatic satellite imagery and timelapse video of a changing earth.

These depictions show the massive scale of the environmental impact of climate change, rising sea levels and urban growth, and underscore the need to develop a viable plan for addressing these issues.

Many thanks to Seth Dixon for sharing this resource.

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oyndrila's curator insight, May 17, 2013 1:24 PM

Exciting!!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:55 AM

summer work KQ2 key concepts: remote sensing, deforestation, desertification, land use, geospatial

Jill Wallace's curator insight, August 20, 2015 7:57 PM

Great images!