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creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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The Health Profile Of Every County In America, Mapped

The Health Profile Of Every County In America, Mapped | green infographics | Scoop.it
This snapshot shines a light on how where we live matters when it comes to our well-being.

When we talk about the health of America, we often talk in broad strokes. We focus on big trends—say, in obesity or diabetes—not what's happening at a more local level.

That's unfortunate for two reasons. One, we might miss some of the variety of health out there—for example, that one county in a state is appreciably less healthy than another. And, two, we might overlook local factors that affect our health as much as federal or state policy, or even our own personal responsibility.

The idea of the County Health Rankings is to shine a light on the local, and show how where we live matters.

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Map: Is There a Risky Chemical Plant Near You?

Map: Is There a Risky Chemical Plant Near You? | green infographics | Scoop.it

Millions of Americans live near a site that could put them in harm's way if hazardous chemicals leak or catch fire. The Environmental Protection Agency monitors roughly 12,000 facilities that store one or more of 140 toxic or flammable chemicals that are potentially hazardous to nearby communities.

The interactive map, based on data from the EPA's Risk Management Program, shows at least 9,000 facilities where a "catastrophic chemical release" or what the EPA calls a "worst-case scenario" could harm nearby residents. At the link, hover over any site to see its exact location, the chemicals it stores, and how many accidents it documented in its most recent 5-year reporting period. 

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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, April 20, 2014 9:52 AM

Good to be informed.

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Infographic: Everything You Need To Know About GMO Laws [or the lack there of]

Infographic: Everything You Need To Know About GMO Laws [or the lack there of] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Are genetically modified foods, better known as GMOs, safe to eat? Although there is no definitive answer to this question yet, American consumers eat genetically engineered foods all the time. However, the maze of labeling laws makes choosing whether or not they want to eat them a totally different story...

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, December 2, 2013 7:34 PM

The Huffington Post and visual.ly tell it like it is with GMOs.

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From Farm to Fork: Our Toxic Food System - infographic

From Farm to Fork: Our Toxic Food System - infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

Food is the fuel we use to get our bodies into motion. 

However, with the way our current food system works, processed foods such as chips, soda, french fries, hamburgers and candy are making up a significant portion of our daily food intake. They’re readily available at every food store, and an ice cold Coca-Cola is very difficult to pass up in favor of sparkling water. The problem, though, is that it’s not even about choosing healthy options. Today, 80% of food in the U.S. is supplied by massive factory farms associated with a myriad of environmental and health risks.


Do you know where your food comes from? Or what’s in it? How is a hotdog made? Today’s conventional food system depends heavily on the use of toxic chemicals and synthetic inputs that pose threats to our health — especially children’s.

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FarmRoof®'s curator insight, June 28, 2013 2:51 PM

What a great infographic!

sTreet's comment, July 5, 2013 4:03 AM
fantastic
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The Seas of Plastic | Visual.ly

The Seas of Plastic | Visual.ly | green infographics | Scoop.it

'We created an interactive data visualisation about plastic pollution in the world’s oceans based on a study that our scientist and oceanographer Laurent Lebreton published in 2012. It is based on the results of a numerical model of floating marine debris and serves to identify the 5 plastic gyres as well as other accumulation zones. Furthermore it provides an insight to relative contributors by regions and allows for comparison by region and accumulation zone.'

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Infographic: The Impact Of EV Solar Charging Stations

Infographic:   The Impact Of EV Solar Charging Stations | green infographics | Scoop.it

There are more benefits to driving a solar charged vehicle than meets the eye.


As technology for these vehicles improve, so will their travel distance and accessibility, as charging stations are becoming more common, with locations at airports, malls, and even college campuses.

Electric vehicles are good for the environment, and recent studies have shown they also play a role in our health. 


This infographic outlines their benefits, compares emissions from the different types of charging stations, maps locations across the US, and summarizes the positive impact electric vehincles have on the economy, environment and our health.

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Electric Car's curator insight, December 30, 2012 12:30 AM

Tesla Motors ( NASDAQ : TSLA ) And SolarCity

have released their Supercharger network

 

Built secretly, Tesla and SolarCity have revealed the first six Superchargers, which will allow the Model S and other electric cars that have the hardware fitted to drive long distances with ultra fast charging, 100% free through California, Nevada and Arizona.

 

Tesla Motors and Elon Musk, CEO, have delivered an audacious preemptive strike on BigOil and Fossil Fuel dealers:

 

Tesla has grabbed the moral environmental high ground with the ambition to have these Solar Powered SuperChargers installed throughout the U.S.A. and then in 2013 - Asia and Europe

Mercor's curator insight, January 31, 2013 9:40 AM

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How Organic is it? (infographic)

How Organic is it? (infographic) | green infographics | Scoop.it

Organic, 100% organic, some of this is organic... it's easy to see why we need a deciphering tool. In an effort to make the best food choices for families and the environment, we often choose organic.

What does the organic label really mean? It tells you that organic meat, poultry, eggs and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones. It is a promise to you that plant foods are produced without using most conventional pesticides. That your fruit and veggies didn’t come to that lovely size and color with use of fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge, bioengineering or ionizing radiation...

This infographic is a straightforward explanation of what organic means to livestock and fruit and vegetables.

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The Importance of Green Schools [Infographic]

The Importance of Green Schools [Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it
Has your school or school district considered going green? With budgets slashed across the board and many schools desperately fighting just to keep their doors open, it seems the push to make schools greener may have gotten lost in the red tape shuffle.

But as the US Green Building Council reminds us, greener schools are healthier schools that save in the long run on everything from sick days to energy costs. This neat infographic shows it nicely. There are 700 MILLION kids nationwide entering our schools everyday. And that figure does not even take into account all of the teachers, administrators, and school staff that walk the halls every day.

With 25 percent of the American population spending the better part of their day in a school, isn't it worth it in terms of health and cost savings to make sure that those schools are toxin-free and energy efficient?

 

Check out this infographic from the US Green Building Council for more details, statistics and facts related to green schools...

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Global Warming: a new report on loss of life and global economic damage

Global Warming: a new report on loss of life and global economic damage | green infographics | Scoop.it

From devastating floods in China and the Philippines to droughts in Africa, the extreme weather patterns that hit the United States have impacted sites around the world as the face of global warming.

According to a new report, climate change has already contributed to 400,000 deaths per year and over $699 billion, 0.9 percent annually, in loss to gross domestic product (GDP). The report estimates even greater damage from air pollution caused by the burning of fossil fuels. also driving global warming.

'Climate Vulnerability Monitor: A Guide to the Cold Calculus of a Hot Planet (2nd Edition)' was written by over 50 scientists, economists and policy experts, and commissioned by 20 governments. The study calculates and compares the vulnerability of 184 countries in terms of environmental disasters, habitat change, health impact and industry stress.

Read on for statistics, implications and global health issues related to these new findings, proving that 'failing to deal with global warming will have real and lasting impacts on local communities, economies, health and safety, and people around the world.'

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Scorecard for the Sea: The Ocean Health Index

Scorecard for the Sea: The Ocean Health Index | green infographics | Scoop.it
To feed, employ, and sustain the world, our oceans must first be in good health. It is becoming increasingly clear that humans have a substantial impact on these marine ecosystems, and that these impacts are not just threatening the high-seas, but also the humans that depend on them for their livelihoods and well-being.

The health of our oceans is, therefore, primarily a human concern. But how do we measure the health of something as vast and bewildering as an entire ocean?

For many years, scientists have struggled to find a way to make the concept of ocean health meaningful and measureable. There have been a few breakthroughs but no real solution to allow us to concretely measure if things are getting better or worse and by how much? That is, until now.

Published in last week’s issue of the journal Nature The Ocean Health Index is a groundbreaking tool that allows us to take a look at how we as humans benefit from the big blue. The Index examines social, economic, and ecological factors, scaling both globally and locally to give us an accurate assessment. It finally gives us the baseline we need to measure progress...

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Ocean Health Study Raises Concerns, Offers Some Hope

Ocean Health Study Raises Concerns, Offers Some Hope | green infographics | Scoop.it

A comprehensive study of global oceanic health gave the world’s oceans a score of 60 out of 100.

The Ocean Health Index, produced by an international team of scientists, policymakers, and conservationists, assessed the vitality of 171 coastal countries and territorial regions in ten categories, including ecological characteristics such as “Coastal Protection,” “Biodiversity,” and sustainable seafood harvests, and economic qualities like “Coastal Livelihoods and Economies” and “Tourism and Recreation.”

The study is “the first comprehensive global measurement of ocean health that includes people as part of the ocean ecosystem,” and is designed to help strengthen national and regional efforts to preserve our coastal environments and evaluate marine health...

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Fruits/Vegetables/Herbs: When Are They In Season? [infographic]

Fruits/Vegetables/Herbs: When Are They In Season? [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it
In a world where you can buy any fruit and vegetables any time of the year, quality, nutrients, and environmental factors are compromised in the process.

As the industrial and economic age of technology has evolved, so has the availability of food year-round. But to accept that these foods are of the utmost quality and quantity (by which I mean $) year-round is quite a fallacy. If you find yourself eating strawberries around Christmas time for instance, it’s most likely those strawberries were picked well over half a year ago and stored in some facility to keep until you bought them at your market. So what’s the problem? Why is it bad to eat any fruit I want, whenever I want?

Well, while there might not be anything incredibly wrong with it, if you buy your produce by the season, the chances that your fruits and vegetables being much cheaper, fresher, and tastier is much more likely. There’s a reason why most restaurants around the world buy by the season. Also, something is lost in both the flavor and nutrients when you artificially keep these foods ‘alive’ for that long.

P.S. for all of you environmentally conscious folks, the carbon footprint that is produced from shipping and storing these fruits and vegetables year-round is quite substantial. So go ahead and visit your local produce market co-op farmers market community garden whatever and get some EATS! Or even better, grow your own!

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No Kid Hungry: Campaign to End Childhood Hunger

No Kid Hungry: Campaign to End Childhood Hunger | green infographics | Scoop.it
The thought of children going to sleep hungry anywhere in the world is tough to swallow.

People may think that hunger is a problem which resides firmly in the hands of third world countries — but they’re mistaken. America has a problem too. America has the food and programs in place to end childhood hunger, but they are up against a lot: the stigmas and embarrassments that surround hunger, the challenges presented by access to healthy food, and the struggle to connect children with the resources they need to thrive.
In 1983, actor Jeff Bridges founded the End Hunger Network, a nonprofit organization dedicated to feeding children around the world. It works with the entertainment industry and partners to produce and support media projects to end U.S. childhood hunger. They have recently partnered with Share Our Strength’s No Kid Hungry national campaign to end childhood hunger in America by 2015. This newly formed partnership will help make this goal even more attainable...

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Income Inequality: It’s Also Bad for Your Health

Income Inequality: It’s Also Bad for Your Health | green infographics | Scoop.it
A study found that in places with more unevenness of income, life spans were shorter.

We know that living in a poor community makes you less likely to live a long life. New evidence suggests that living in a community with high income inequality also seems to be bad for your health.

A study from researchers at the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute examined a series of risk factors that help explain the health (or sickness) of counties in the United States. In addition to the suspects you might expect — a high smoking rate, a lot of violent crime — the researchers found that people in unequal communities were more likely to die before the age of 75 than people in more equal communities, even if the average incomes were the same.

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Mercury Rising: Protecting the Health of Humans, Waterways and Fish [infographic]

Mercury Rising: Protecting the Health of Humans, Waterways and Fish [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

The news is abuzz with reports of mercury-contaminated fish traversing our waters, and www.fix.com has created an infographic entitled “Mercury Rising: Enjoy Fish Without the Risk” explaining the dangers of mercury, who it affects, and how to avoid consuming this neurotoxin. Mercury is found naturally in our environment, however, in high concentrations, it can be dangerous. Unfortunately, due to contaminated emissions from businesses such as power plants, cement plants, and chemical manufacturers, over 18 million acres of lakes, wetlands, and estuaries are now contaminated by mercury. Additionally, over 1.2 million river miles have also been contaminated, and those numbers are rising every year.

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Infographic: How Our Cities Are Shaping Us

Infographic: How Our Cities Are Shaping Us | green infographics | Scoop.it

Architects and city planners are becoming more and more familiar with the health effects of our built environment.  This to-the-point infographic, designed by Chris Yoon, cites a few ways in which mid-20th century city planning trends have contributed to a growing obesity problem in the United States.  This data has alarmed scientists, planners and city officials into stressing the importance of redesigning the physical spaces so as to encourage physical activity and healthy choices.


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World Health Day - Battle of the Cities | Infographic

World Health Day - Battle of the Cities | Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

Is your city the fittest? In honor of World Health Day MapMyFitness hosted a global challenge to find the fittest cities.


The Battle of the Cities contest encouraged users worldwide to log workouts for city points. The winners were chosen based on the percentage of increased activity over the weekend compared to the last 30 days. Over 18,000 cities competed and the results are in...

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Jim Gramata's curator insight, April 12, 2013 9:55 AM

Way to get fit Chicago. We take first place...where's the medal?

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Infographic: America's Fresh Food Movement

Infographic: America's Fresh Food Movement | green infographics | Scoop.it

According to a 2012 survey, 87% of U.S. consumers agree that they eat more whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables now that they did five years ago.

Amidst high-profile medical research proving the healthfulness of these types of food, as well as a subsequent backlash against processed, consumer-packaged goods, the American public is taking note of where the food's coming from. More are seeking fresh produce at their grocery stores and farmers' markets. Some are even growing it in their backyards. What other trends are occurring, and what is most important to consumers?

Find out more about healthy eating at Good's Food hub: good.is/food.


Via Flora Moon
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Prop 37 may not have passed, but the Non-GMO movement is still winning...

Prop 37 may not have passed, but the Non-GMO movement is still winning... | green infographics | Scoop.it

We know many are feeling disappointment about the defeat of proposition 37 in California, but there is actually a lot to celebrate.

Prop 37 has exponentially elevated the GMO conversation, not just in California but across the country. Opportunities to protect the future of our food are still powerful and plentiful, so stay positive and stay engaged!

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Don't Worry, Drive On: Fossil Fools & Fracking Lies

Don't Worry, Drive On: Fossil Fools & Fracking Lies | green infographics | Scoop.it
Two things never seem to change about crude oil: the constant warnings that our thirst for it is unsustainable, and the fact that we continue to use it...

 

These two troubling trends are issues which should be dealt with, and quickly, as this intriguing motion graphic from The Post Carbon Institute points out.
They make the case that in recent years the political rhetoric has increased, pointing to so-called “new” technologies as solutions to the un-sustainability of fossil fuels. One such technology, fracking, aims high pressure water and chemicals into our soils, releasing both oil and natural gasses. In fact an old technology, a multitude of problems arise from its use, not least of which is the pollution of ground waters and the destabilization of soils resulting in earthquakes in previously stable areas. As if that wasn’t bad enough, the technology is expensive to use and only begins to makes sense financially in a world with high enough fuel prices – the world of today.


Isn’t it time we start getting realistic about our true fuel situation? Watch the video at the link for more information, then check out The Post Carbon Institute to show your support...

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Brad Wells's curator insight, October 21, 2014 12:43 PM

This is info-packed...

Alex

a

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Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture

Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture | green infographics | Scoop.it
There are currently 1 billion people in the world today who are hungry. There's also another billion people who over eat unhealthy foods.

 Food production around the world today is mostly done through industrial agriculture, and by judging current issues with obesity, worldwide food shortages, and the destruction of soil, it may not be the best process. We need to be able to feed our world without destroying it, and finding a more sustainable approach to accomplishing that is becoming more important.

The current system contributes to 1/3 of global emissions, is a polluter of our world’s water resources, and is a contributor to health problems. Industrial agriculture relies on mass produced, mechanized labor-saving policies that have pushed people out of rural areas and into cities, consolidating land and resources into fewer hands.

Agroecology looks to reduces agriculture’s impact on climate by working within natural systems. This is especially beneficial in rural areas, because the local community a major part of the growing process. The approach can conserve and protect soil and water — through terracing, contour farming, intercropping, and agroforestry — especially beneficial in areas where farmers lack modern irrigation infrastructure, or have farms situated on hillsides and other difficult farming sites...

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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, October 1, 2013 9:53 PM

Clearly industrial agriculture is not sustainable, and must be replaced entirely with systems that reverse the current damage and restore the balance that used to exist before we messed things up.  We can use plants and animals not only to feed ourselves, but to *improve* the environment for all life on the planet.

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Always thought that Tap Water was clean? Think again (Infographic)

Always thought that Tap Water was clean? Think again (Infographic) | green infographics | Scoop.it

Did you know that tap water can contain pesticides, herbicides, bacterias, micro-organisms, organic materials and radio-nuclicides which can cause water-related illness?

Learn how you can reduce the risk of disease by up to 33% with effective water filtration...

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Infographic: Which States Have the Worst Air?

Infographic: Which States Have the Worst Air? | green infographics | Scoop.it
Which states have the largest share of toxic emissions from the electric sector? And how does that threaten our health?

The Natural Resources Defense Council recently published its yearly 'Toxic Twenty' list that ranks states by air pollution.

Find more details and statistics on air quality and the related health issues at the article link...

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Food and Water infographics | Center for Investigative Reporting

Food and Water infographics | Center for Investigative Reporting | green infographics | Scoop.it

There's something about a searing hot summer day that leads a guy to kick off his shoes, turn on his fan and head to the Internet in search of cool graphics about the importance of water in the global food system.

Thanks to the Water Footprint Network, where we found several of these...

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Infographic: 9 Shocking Facts About the Food Industry

Infographic: 9 Shocking Facts About the Food Industry | green infographics | Scoop.it
The U.S. grows more corn than any other country on Earth. That’s a good thing, right? Well…depends on how you look at it.

Modern farming techniques and massive government subsidies have turned corn into an incredibly productive — and incredibly cheap — crop. This infographic created with TakePart looks at how those innocent-looking yellow ears are a big reason why the American diet has gotten worse and American waistlines have gotten larger over the past half century...

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