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creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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An Eye-Opening Map of the Future of Global Development

An Eye-Opening Map of the Future of Global Development | green infographics | Scoop.it

By 2050, the world’s population is projected to approach nine billion. With more people will come more developed land—a lot more.

Urbanization, agriculture, energy, and mining put 20 percent of the world’s remaining forests, grasslands, and other natural ecosystems at risk of conversion by 2050.

With that kind of expansion, there are sure to be harms—namely clean water, clean air, and biodiversity. 

To mitigate some of those risks, scientists and geographers at the Nature Conservancy have taken a crucial step by mapping the potential impact that human growth will have on natural lands.

It’s the most comprehensive look to date at how major forms of development will take over fragile ecosystems, if left unchecked...

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What’s Happening to Biodiversity? [infographic]

What’s Happening to Biodiversity? [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Biodiversity—the variety of plants, animals and ecosystems in the world—is a measure of our planet’s health.


Overexploitation of species, habitat destruction, and the introduction of invasive species are threatening Earth’s biodiversity. It’s time to turn the tide...

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World Supplies of Non-Renewable Resources, Visualized [Environmental Infographic]

World Supplies of Non-Renewable Resources, Visualized [Environmental Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

Politicians and oil companies might waste time debating whether or not we’ve reached peak oil. What they ignore is that we run out completely in under 40 years’ time, by which time a third of the planet’s biodiversity will be lost.

In the meantime, tantalum, that great mainstay of mobile telecoms, will last only a few years more and run out just in time to celebrate the planet breaking the 2oC barrier in 2060.
There’s so much more words could say, but this, a very relevant and informative environmensl visualization, says is so much better...

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Monitoring Marine Ecosystems: Ocean Acidification and New Efforts in Real Time Assessment

Monitoring Marine Ecosystems: Ocean Acidification and New Efforts in Real Time Assessment | green infographics | Scoop.it
Scientists have developed a satellite technique to capture a near real-time view of ocean acidification.

Their findings, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, showing how data from satellites that measure salinity and other ocean conditions could be combined to produce a new way of monitoring acidification.

Oceans are taking in about 90 percent of the excess heat created by human greenhouse gas emissions, but they’re also absorbing some of the carbon dioxide (CO2) itself. 

A set of chemical processes dissolves that CO2 and turns it into carbonic acid and sets off a complex changes to the chemistry of seawater, which dissolves shells and coral and creates a cascade effect that could disrupt entire marine ecosystems.

A recent study estimated $1 trillion annually in losses caused by ocean acidification by 2100, if left unmitigated. Some research has looked at “designer” corals and other creatures that could survive more acidic seas but more work needs to be done to figure out just what will thrive (or at least survive) the changing acidity...

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Environmental Data Mapped: Ecosystem Stress in the Great Lakes

Environmental Data Mapped:  Ecosystem Stress in the Great Lakes | green infographics | Scoop.it

A first-of-its-kind map that pulls together numerical data on nearly three dozen factors that affect the Great Lakes ecosystem shows that the lakes with the most urban and agricultural development in their watersheds are also those with the greatest environmental stress.


Lakes Erie and Ontario, the easternmost lakes, are challenged by high coastal population densities, an industrial legacy and phosphorous pollution from agricultural runoff. They are also downstream from wind currents that drop nitrogen generated by industries and power plants into their waters.

But the map’s patches of high-stress red and yellow should not be misinterpreted. The color scale is a relative measure that compares the combined stress of the 34 environmental indicators in a particular area to the stress level of the lake system as a whole.


To create the maps, the research team queried some 160 experts from universities, nonprofits and government agencies in the United States and Canada and compiled a list of 50 key biological, chemical or physical indicators, of which two-thirds had data sufficient enough to be plotted.

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Friday Infographic: Fishing Down the Food Chain | The Beacon

Friday Infographic: Fishing Down the Food Chain | The Beacon | green infographics | Scoop.it
Oceana is the largest international ocean conservation organization. Today’s infographic illustrates how overfishing fundamentally alters ocean ecosystems, leading to fewer and smaller fish over time.
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