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green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
Curated by Lauren Moss
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How to Add Bike Lanes Without Messing Up Traffic Flow: An Animated Visualization

How to Add Bike Lanes Without Messing Up Traffic Flow: An Animated Visualization | green infographics | Scoop.it

As bike lanes get added to streets around the US one common concern keeps arising: how will this affect congestion? Narrowing roadways by including bike lanes seems like it would clearly increase car traffic, but data from New York City suggests that when done correctly, adding bike lanes can actually speed up traffic flow. Since 2007, the city has added over 30 miles of protected bike lanes.

The solution most commonly used? Road diets.

A road diet is commonly described as “removing travel lanes from a roadway and utilizing the space for other uses and travel modes.” There are many implementation strategies, but when done correctly they provide smoother traffic flow through neighborhoods and better safety for everyone using the road...

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Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities

Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities | green infographics | Scoop.it
Architects and Planners across the country are harnessing the potential of Big Data to build information-laden city-scale models. By gathering and synthesizing such factors as traffic, energy usage, water flows, and air quality, the urban design field is hoping to layout smarter, more efficient, and more resilient forms of development.
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Hilary McEwan's curator insight, February 17, 2015 7:17 AM

Having already made a huge difference to the landscape of the financial, public health and manufacturing sectors, it looks like we can expect Big Data to keep on trucking, so to speak, and right in to the major infrastructure decisions that drive our city planning.


But does it make sense to plan a city on digital footprints instead of real-time foot fall and the day to day needs of the population? Each of us behaves very differently online to how we live offline, so can turning that data into a streetplan really change the way we live for the better?

Juanma Holgado's curator insight, February 21, 2015 4:57 AM

Big Data i arquitectura, la construccio inteligent de la ciutat cercant eficiencia i sostenibilitat

Norm Miller's curator insight, February 23, 2015 11:23 PM

This is like BMS but for cities.   It makes sense.  

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INFOGRAPHIC: 19 Brilliant Student Teams Headed to the 2013 Solar Decathlon

INFOGRAPHIC: 19 Brilliant Student Teams Headed to the 2013 Solar Decathlon | green infographics | Scoop.it
The Department of Energy just launched a great infographic that shines light on the teams in the 2013 Solar Decathlon and the competition as a whole.

19 teams of brilliant students from across the states and around the world will compete to build the most efficient solar-powered house in the 2013 Solar Decathlon

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IOANNIS APOSTOLOU's curator insight, September 22, 2013 4:42 AM

Team efforts always creates new future!

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Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic)

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | green infographics | Scoop.it

For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future.

In the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned “arcology” - a word that combines “architecture” and “ecology," with a goal of building structures to house large populations in self-contained environments with a self-sustaining economy and agriculture.
 
“In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri)
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luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 7:42 AM
For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future as giant structures that contain entire metropolises. To some, these buildings present the best means for cities to exist in harmony with nature, while others forsee grotesque monstrosities destructive to the human spirit. In the mid-20th century, engineer and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller imagined city-enclosing plastic domes and enormous housing projects resembling nuclear cooling towers. These ideas are impractical but they explore the limits of conventional architectural thinking.  Science fiction writers and artists often imagine future architecture that oppresses the human spirit. Megastructures such as the pyramid-like Tyrell Buildings of “Blade Runner” dominate a decrepit skyline. The decaying old city is simply covered with layers of newer, larger buildings in a process of “retrofitting.” Beginning in the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned a more humane approach. The word “arcology” is a combination of “architecture” and “ecology.” The goal is to build megastructures that would house a population of a million or more people, but in a self-contained environment with its own economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri) In 1996, a group of 75 Japanese corporations commissioned Soleri to design the one-kilometer-tall Hyper Bulding, a vertical city for 100,000 people. Existing in harmony with nature, the Hyper Building was designed to recycle waste, produce food in greenhouses, and use the sun’s light and heat for power and climate control.  The structure was designed for passive heating and cooling without the need for machinery. An economic recession put the brakes on the project and it was never built. Soleri’s arcology concept is being put to the test in the Arcosanti experimental community being built in Arizona. Construction began in 1970. When complete the town will house 5,000 people. Buildings are composed of locally produced concrete and are designed to capture sunlight and heat. To be built in the desert near Abu Dhabi, Masdar is a 2.3-square-mile (6 sq km) planned city of 40,000 residents. Buildings are designed to reduce reliance on artificial lighting and air conditioning, and the city will run entirely on solar power and renewable energy. Begun in 2006, the project is planned for completion around 2020-2025.
Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 9, 2013 5:44 AM

Amazing and beautiful analysis!! Believe it or not, the science fiction also has something to teach us about the city of tomorrow.

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Urbanist Toolkit Bracket Challenge: Championship Round

Urbanist Toolkit Bracket Challenge: Championship Round | green infographics | Scoop.it

Welcome to the first annual Urbanist Toolkit Bracket Challenge, where the hottest trends in urbanism go head-to-head in a conceptual game that challenges the instincts, tastes, and urban design wisdom of readers.

Here's how it works:

Thirty-two in-form tools of urbanism have been seeded, according to their popularity and utility, into four regional groups: the Ed Koch, the Sidewalk Ballet, the Le Corbusier, and the Dandyhorse. The four #1 seeds -- car share, bike lanes, farmers' markets, and the waterfront promenade -- are paired off against decidedly more obscure options.


It's the nature of an elimination tournament: two urban design features enter, one urban design feature emerges victorious. At the moment we have a choice between Bike Lanes and Pedestrian Street.


The Pedestrian Street easily trumped the Waterfront Promenade, 69-31, to advance to the finals. On the left side of the bracket, Bike Lanes sent congestion pricing back to the theoretical realm, 60-40, in a match-up that many people found particularly aggravating, for reasons that commenter Quinn Raymond elucidated at the very start of the bracket challenge: "The final question is basically, 'Would you rather stab yourself in the face or the chest?'"

(Confused? Check out the Final Four, the Elite Eight, the Sweet Sixteen, or the initial post for more info on the entries.)

Lauren Moss's insight:

An interesting concept in the realm of planning and development: a challenge to determine the urban design elements that readers of the Atlantic Cities prioritize as transformative.

For more details, view previous articles on this inaugural, interactive challenge...

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Funnel Incorporated + Green Infographics

Funnel Incorporated + Green Infographics | green infographics | Scoop.it
Funnel Incorporated creates information design that makes the complex clear.

One well-executed infographic or icon can be used for fundraising, presentations, media outreach, online, annual reports, events and more making this investment cost effective as well.

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Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities

Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities | green infographics | Scoop.it
Architects and Planners across the country are harnessing the potential of Big Data to build information-laden city-scale models. By gathering and synthesizing such factors as traffic, energy usage, water flows, and air quality, the urban design field is hoping to layout smarter, more efficient, and more resilient forms of development.
more...
Hilary McEwan's curator insight, February 17, 2015 7:17 AM

Having already made a huge difference to the landscape of the financial, public health and manufacturing sectors, it looks like we can expect Big Data to keep on trucking, so to speak, and right in to the major infrastructure decisions that drive our city planning.


But does it make sense to plan a city on digital footprints instead of real-time foot fall and the day to day needs of the population? Each of us behaves very differently online to how we live offline, so can turning that data into a streetplan really change the way we live for the better?

Juanma Holgado's curator insight, February 21, 2015 4:57 AM

Big Data i arquitectura, la construccio inteligent de la ciutat cercant eficiencia i sostenibilitat

Norm Miller's curator insight, February 23, 2015 11:23 PM

This is like BMS but for cities.   It makes sense.  

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Shaping The Office Of The Future: Workspace Design Trends [Infographic]

Shaping The Office Of The Future: Workspace Design Trends [Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

We have been witnessing major transformations in the corporate mentality regarding office design. Here are some of the main workspace design trends...

According to this infographic from Alliance Interiors, more changes are yet to come, as the office of the future will be less business-focused and more employee-oriented. As a result of switching from closed offices to open offices- one of the most visible upgrade in workspace layout- we find out that the speed and accuracy of work has increased with 440%. This is mostly why open offices will continue to shape working environments in the years to come.

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Clarence | MSRE, LEED GA's curator insight, September 5, 2014 1:46 PM

Norm Miller's insight:  There is more to it than in this review encouraging open offices.  JLL had a nice report that focused on value adding activities and noting that solo thinking in isolation was one of those.  But this is still very useful.

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Infographic: How 10 Historical Planners Have Shaped Today's Cities

Infographic: How 10 Historical Planners Have Shaped Today's Cities | green infographics | Scoop.it

Urban design isn’t easy, so when we find a way to make cities work, we often stick with it for a decent chunk of time. Throughout history, urban planners have presented different ideas on how to design successful cities, and their impact is still being felt today.

This infographic looks at how ten urban planners have shaped cities, including London, Paris and Washington D.C.

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IOANNIS APOSTOLOU's curator insight, September 13, 2013 9:27 AM

History lesson for city planning!

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Town Square Initiative: New York - Urban Planning and Design Concepts

Town Square Initiative: New York - Urban Planning and Design Concepts | green infographics | Scoop.it

The Town Square Initiative is a yearlong volunteer effort in which Gensler designers set out to unearth and re-imagine unexpected open space in cities around the globe. All 43 Gensler offices were invited to participate in the conceptual project, in which we challenged our designers to identify open space in the city and reimagine it as a town square.


Visit the link for more images, diagrams and information on Gensler New York’s design of their future city.

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Infographics: Using The Olympic Rings To Show Vast Inequalities

Infographics: Using The Olympic Rings To Show Vast Inequalities | green infographics | Scoop.it
The Olympics promise many things--triumph of the human spirit, amazing athletic prowess, upsets and underdogs--but the most modern games are ultimately nothing if not a massive, global spectacle.

Gustavo Sousa, a painter and creative director at Mother’s London office, was interested in exploring behind the pomp and circumstance. “Events like these can be a good time for reflection,” Sousa says. These graphics illustrate stripped-down statistics from each region through simple scale shifts of the tournament’s iconic quintet of overlapping loops.“The rings represent healthy competition and union, but we know the world isn’t perfect. Maybe understanding the differences is the first step to try to make things more equal.”

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Sustainable Cities Institute: The Sustainable City

Sustainable Cities Institute: The Sustainable City | green infographics | Scoop.it
#SEA2030 The Sustainable Cities Institute has a fun interactive map. Have you seen it?
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