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green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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NASA’s massive new dataset gives a daily weather report through 2100

NASA’s massive new dataset gives a daily weather report through 2100 | green infographics | Scoop.it
NASA’s massive new dataset tells us what the daily weather report will be in 2100.

A supercomputer at NASA has just provided us with high-resolution climate projections through the end of the century. The massive new 11-terabyte data set combines historical daily temperatures and precipitation measurements with climate simulations under two greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. The project spans from 1950 to 2100, but users can easily zero in on daily timescales for their own locales—which is precisely the point.

The projections can be found on Amazon for free for all to see and plan by. The space agency hopes that developing nations and poorer communities that may not have any spare supercomputers lying around will use the info to predict and prepare for climate change...

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Heat Mapping the World's Hottest Temperatures

Heat Mapping the World's Hottest Temperatures | green infographics | Scoop.it
The Andrew Sykes Group, a large air conditioning firm based in the UK, has developed this interactive displaying record highs, and current temperatures from select cities across the globe. 

While Climate Central's interactive tool (displaying the average temperature cities across the U.S. are expected to reach by 2100) did little to make those of us suffering a sweltering summer feel optimistic about the future, the interactive graphic at the link provides some perspective that current temperatures could be worse.

The Andrew Sykes Group has developed this interactive displaying record highs, and current temperatures from select cities across the globe. Smaller nodes represent cities, while larger nodes stand for the hottest temperatures ever seen on each continent.

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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, August 9, 2014 8:08 PM

The Andrew Sykes Group has developed this interactive displaying record highs, and current temperatures from select cities across the globe. Smaller nodes represent cities, while larger nodes stand for the hottest temperatures ever seen on each continent.

Russell Roberts's curator insight, September 14, 2014 4:10 AM

Fascinating interactive tool that displays the rising temperature trends around the world.  Science fact or just natural cycles, the planet is getting warmer.  This graphic is a sobering reminder of how lucky were are right now.  The future is going to be hot, drier, and more uncomfortable than it is now.  Aloha, Russ.

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What is a Climate and Energy Indicator? | Infographic

What is a Climate and Energy Indicator? | Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

This infographic is from the 2014 Environmental Performance Index. The Environmental Performance Index (EPI) ranks how well countries perform on high-priority environmental issues in two broad policy areas: protection of human health from environmental harm and protection of ecosystems. Within these two policy objectives the EPI scores country performance in nine issue areas comprised of 20 indicators. Indicators in the EPI measure how close countries are to meeting internationally established targets or, in the absence of agreed-upon targets, how they compare to the range of observed countries.

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Visualizing 100 Years Of Climate Data

Visualizing 100 Years Of Climate Data | green infographics | Scoop.it

What does 100 years worth of climate data look like when rendered in an interactive, color-coded map? A continental tug-of-war between red (for heat) and blue (for cold), as seasons come and go and cold air replaces the warm.

The infographic is the work of data visualization studio Halftone, whose principals originally pursued the idea of making a map to visualize data about coffee production against key environmental factors, like temperature and precipitation.


"Our goal with this project was not to facilitate precise analysis, but to expose how every single month produces a unique and beautiful artwork through our Voronoi tessellated approximation of a heat map," write the creators. "The underlying map of satellite imagery and major geographic features adds a second layer for exploration."

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Paint By Particle: A Beautiful Climate Model By NASA

Paint By Particle: A Beautiful Climate Model By NASA | green infographics | Scoop.it
With all of the satellites in our skies, NASA collects up to 30 million observations of the Earth each day.
But it is only when these observations are layered into one picture, called climate modeling, that we get to see the wispy beauty of our atmosphere. The video below, titled Paint By Particle, was published by NASAexplore and allows us to “watch as dust and sea salt swirl inside cyclones, carbon bursts from fires, sulfate streams from volcanoes—and see how these aerosols paint the modeled world.” Enjoy!
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Infographic: Bring the Heat | Environment

Infographic: Bring the Heat | Environment | green infographics | Scoop.it
Is a more complete picture of global carbon footprint rankings possible when weather is taken into account?

Carbon dioxide emissions affect the climate, but how do personal responses to local climate changes affect a country's carbon emissions? In hot areas of the world, people need more air conditioning and less heating. The opposite applies to cooler areas. Therefore, it's reasonable to expect a different baseline for carbon emissions from countries with extreme climates than ones with moderate weather...

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What is the cost of climate change to our oceans?

What is the cost of climate change to our oceans? | green infographics | Scoop.it
A study claims to show how climate change could cost the marine economy trillions of dollars per year, but how can you cost the oceans?

Scientists in Sweden claim climate change could cause almost $2tn of damage per year through marine impacts alone by 2100 if emissions continue to rise at current rates.

Valuing the Ocean, a study by the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) is due to be published in June this year and has assigned monetary values to five categories of ocean services in a bid to establish an objective calculation for the costs of climate change to the marine economy.

The study uses one high- and one low-emissions scenario as defined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to show how quick and concerted efforts to minimise global warming could lead to savings of $1.37tn per year - or 0.25% or projected global GDP - by 2100...

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Citizen Science – an interactive map of wind visualization and temperature

Citizen Science – an interactive map of wind visualization and temperature | green infographics | Scoop.it

Nicolas Garcia Belmonte has visualized wind motion in the USA- the visualization shows wind direction encoded in line angles, wind speed encoded in line lengths and disk radius, and temperature encoded in hue. All this for about 1200 weather stations across the country.

You can switch between different visual markers from the top menu, also play the wind motion for the 72 hours or select a specific time from the timeline below the graphic...

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Mapping the LA Neighborhoods Most at Risk From Global Warming

Mapping the LA Neighborhoods Most at Risk From Global Warming | green infographics | Scoop.it

The UCLA Luskin Center and Environmental Defense Fund have just released a new report looking at Los Angeles's opportunities for using more solar power (which are still 98% untapped, they say) and it includes these fascinating maps of which areas of LA County are most vulnerable to global warming.

According to the report, it's the "first study to provide specific climate-change projections for the greater Los Angeles area [in the years 2041 to 2060], with unique projections down to the neighborhood level." By mid-century, SoCal can look forward to "slightly warmer winters and springs but much warmer summers and falls, with more frequent heat waves," but the burden won't be spread around evenly: "The study predicts a likely tripling in the number of extremely hot days in the downtown area and quadrupling the number in the valleys and at high elevations." But of course higher temps aren't the only threat.

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State-by-State Temperature Map: Red-Hot Out West

State-by-State Temperature Map: Red-Hot Out West | green infographics | Scoop.it

Take a look at this year's temperatures by state. California was five degrees warmer than its 20th-century average, whereas Michigan and Mississippi experienced near record cold. 

That is to say, climate change doesn't mean it will never be cold again, but it does mean that when a heat wave hits, it is more likely to be more extreme than the ones preceding it. "It is very likely that heat waves will be more intense, more frequent and longer lasting in a future warmer climate," the Intergovernmetnal Panel on Climate Change wrote back in 2007.

Any individual weather event or pattern can't be blamed directly on the atmospheric changes caused by burning fossil fuels. But if we ask the question a little bit differently, we can discern a climate trend: how likely is it that California would be experiencing the kind of heat we've seen without the human influence on the climate? It might happen, but it'd be very, very unlikely.

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Cooling Los Angeles, From the Roof Down

Cooling Los Angeles, From the Roof Down | green infographics | Scoop.it

What’s the coolest place in Los Angeles? It may be right over your head. Starting in 2014, thanks to an update of the Municipal Building Code, all new or refurbished buildings will be equipped with “cool roofs.”

A cool roof is built of reflective rather than absorptive material. Compared to traditional roofs, cool roofs can be as much as 50 degrees cooler on the roof surface, and can lower interior building temperatures by several degrees. Los Angeles is the first major American city to pass a cool-roof ordinance...

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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, January 5, 2014 12:31 AM

We can even go this one better with green roof designs.  But light is preferable to dark when it comes to surfaces in our hot climate (this is why adobes were white washed).  Our most energy-intensive season is the the hottest period at end of summer/early fall months, with most of that energy going into air conditioning to cool heated buildings.

Norm Miller's curator insight, January 8, 2014 1:48 PM

Great to see LA becoming a leader in requiring cool roofs that cost no more.

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11,000 Years' Worth of Climate Data

11,000 Years' Worth of Climate Data | green infographics | Scoop.it

New research takes the deepest dive ever into historic climate records.


Back in 1999 Penn State climate scientist Michael Mann released the climate change movement's most potent symbol: The "hockey stick," a line graph of global temperature over the last 1,500 years that shows an unmistakable, massive uptick in the twentieth century when humans began to dump large amounts of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. It's among the most compelling bits of proof out there that human beings are behind global warming, and as such has become a target on Mann's back for climate denialists looking to draw a bead on scientists.


Now it's gotten a makeover: A study published in Science reconstructs global temperatures further back than ever before -- a full 11,300 years. The new analysis finds that the only problem with Mann's hockey stick was that its handle was about 9,000 years too short...

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Global Climate at Risk as Nearly 1,200 New Coal Plants Proposed [interactive infographic]

Global Climate at Risk as Nearly 1,200 New Coal Plants Proposed [interactive infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it

The World Resources Institute (WRI) released a report, Global Coal Risk Assessment, that analyzes information about proposed new coal-fired plants and other market trends in order to assess potential future risks to the global climate.

The report finds that there are 1,199 new coal power plants in the works, totaling more than 1.4 million megawatts of capacity worldwide. That’s four times the capacity of all the coal-fired power plants in the U.S. Seventy-six percent of the coal plants are proposed for India and China, with the U.S. seventh in the world for coal power plants in development.
According to the WRI, if all of these projects are built, it would add new coal power capacity that is almost four times the current capacity of all coal-fired plants in the U.S.


View the locations of proposed coal-fired power plants by country in this interactive map at the article link.

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Climate Change Infographics: Sea Level Rise

Climate Change Infographics: Sea Level Rise | green infographics | Scoop.it
Infographics have been popping up everywhere lately. A combination of image and information (often as graphs and charts), they are a great way to present.

Over coming weeks I hope to feature infographics regarding climate change, nature and health, along with some background information about their design and use.

The first one, showing the predicted effects of sea level rise on the world’s major cities, comes from Keeping our head above water | GDS Publishing.

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Storm Surge Interactive Map Shows What Parts of NYC Could be Affected by Rising Sea Levels

Storm Surge Interactive Map Shows What Parts of NYC Could be Affected by Rising Sea Levels | green infographics | Scoop.it
Climate Central's new Storm Surge interactive map helps New Yorkers see if their neighborhoods could be flooded by rising sea levels.

Although the city has committed to investing in a system to deter an abundance of stormwater overflow, flooding is still a major concern for New York City. The New Jersey non-profit, Climate Central, has created an interactive map that illustrates to New Yorkers just how global warming and flooding could affect the city by as early as 2020. Called Surging Seas, the map allows visitors to type in their zip codes and see projected flooding risks over time...

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