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creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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New York Is the World's Most Wasteful Megacity, in 3 Charts

New York Is the World's Most Wasteful Megacity, in 3 Charts | green infographics | Scoop.it

New York, many say, is the greatest city in the world. It also might be the most wasteful.

That's according to a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The large research team, led by Christopher A. Kennedy of the University of Toronto, examined how 27 "megacities" (metropolitan areas with more than 10 million people) metabolize resources and create waste. Together these monster cities consume 9.3 percent of the world's electricity and produce 12.6 percent of the world's waste—even though they contain only 6.7 percent of the world's population.

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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, May 7, 10:12 PM

“The New York metropolis has 12 million fewer people than Tokyo, yet it uses more energy in total: the equivalent of one oil supertanker every 1.5 days,” he said. “When I saw that, I thought it was just incredible.”

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The Cost of Sprawl: A Visual Comparison

The Cost of Sprawl: A Visual Comparison | green infographics | Scoop.it

The cost of sprawl is 2.5 times more expensive than the compact city.

Sidewalks, water and wastewater pipes, schools and libraries, police and fire protection, and of course, roads. And whether the costs are paid by the homeowner, the local government, or businesses, the lower density in the suburbs leads to higher costs to operate, maintain and replace all these services...

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Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, March 10, 10:12 AM

     Sprawl is the spread of development over the landscape. For suburban areas it's going to be more expensive than urban areas. Sprawl in suburban areas would overall take more time in making it more as an urban area. Making urban areas more industrial is going to be a lot easier especially since the area has already been industrialized. 

I.C.

Eben Lenderking's curator insight, March 11, 8:22 AM

Pile 'em high

Suzette Jackson's curator insight, May 24, 2:04 AM

The cost of sprawl is 2.5 times more expensive than the compact city.

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Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities

Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities | green infographics | Scoop.it
Architects and Planners across the country are harnessing the potential of Big Data to build information-laden city-scale models. By gathering and synthesizing such factors as traffic, energy usage, water flows, and air quality, the urban design field is hoping to layout smarter, more efficient, and more resilient forms of development.
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Hilary McEwan's curator insight, February 17, 7:17 AM

Having already made a huge difference to the landscape of the financial, public health and manufacturing sectors, it looks like we can expect Big Data to keep on trucking, so to speak, and right in to the major infrastructure decisions that drive our city planning.


But does it make sense to plan a city on digital footprints instead of real-time foot fall and the day to day needs of the population? Each of us behaves very differently online to how we live offline, so can turning that data into a streetplan really change the way we live for the better?

Juanma Holgado's curator insight, February 21, 4:57 AM

Big Data i arquitectura, la construccio inteligent de la ciutat cercant eficiencia i sostenibilitat

Norm Miller's curator insight, February 23, 11:23 PM

This is like BMS but for cities.   It makes sense.  

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Flowing Maps Explore the City's Impact on the Local Environment

Flowing Maps Explore the City's Impact on the Local Environment | green infographics | Scoop.it

Digital artist and illustrator Istvan has created a series of maps which artfully imagine the affect of cities and their human inhabitants on the local environment. His colorful images aren’t scientific in nature, but rather a personal exploration of what it might look like if the energies of the metropolis flowed out of the city itself.

“I wanted to represent the influence of cities on their environment as a kind of invisible fluid that overflows from the city to its surrounding.”

The flow of each city map was digitally rendered using local terrain to simulate the erosion flow Istvan desired, then reworked in Photoshop to create a unique identity for each place. The final images were printed on 70cm square acrylic glass.


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How Much Space Do Cars Take? Cyclists Demonstrate How Bicycles Fight Congestion

How Much Space Do Cars Take? Cyclists Demonstrate How Bicycles Fight Congestion | green infographics | Scoop.it

People that commute by car spend an inordinate amount of time staring at taillights. There’s no way they’re getting around that traffic in front of them. But what about bike commuters? This group of Latvian cyclists recently created a powerful demonstration of the large footprint created by cars that carry just one occupant.

The four cyclists strapped on fragile frameworks shaped like cars, then hopped into the local traffic in Riga to show how much room they would occupy on their daily commute. The difference communicates loud and clear: if these cyclists were actually in cars, they would seriously add to congestion.

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Russell Roberts's curator insight, October 17, 2014 12:23 PM

Interesting study from Latvia.  Something to think about when fossil fuels  run out or become too expensive to buy. Protection from bad weather is a definite plus for cars.  Or, you could have commuters park their cars in a municipal lot and use bikes to reach their workplaces once they enter the city.  Aloha, Russ.

Jim Gramata's curator insight, October 27, 2014 10:49 AM

Visually compelling look at the power of the bike commute 

Agence Relations d'Utilité Publique's curator insight, November 24, 2014 5:06 AM

Les images parlent d'elles même...

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Are These Cities Foreshadowing the End of Sprawl?

Are These Cities Foreshadowing the End of Sprawl? | green infographics | Scoop.it
Are Atlanta, Detroit, and Miami set to put car-dependent development in park and pull forward as the new leaders of walkable urban development?

When it comes to discussing sprawl, Atlanta and Detroit have served as poster children for expansive geographic footprints that create driving-dependent lifestyles. However, new research predicts that these two metropolises may now be representative of the cities transitioning from sprawl-based development to walkable urbanism, signaling a major shift in development and lifestyle patterns. The report, "Foot Traffic Ahead: Ranking Walkable Urbanism in America's Largest Metros" predicts that if current development trends continue, cities such as Atlanta, Detroit, and Miami will bound from the bottom third of the list, where they currently reside, to the top 10 metropolises for walkable urban places...

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INFOGRAPHIC: How Green Cities Can Help Sustain the Future

INFOGRAPHIC: How Green Cities Can Help Sustain the Future | green infographics | Scoop.it

People around the world are moving to urban areas in record numbers – and for the first time ever there’s more people living in cities than in rural areas. This trend is only set to accelerate, so it’s high time to develop solutions to make our cities more sustainable. CityTownInfo just launched a new infographic that shows how greener cities can pave the way to a sustainable future – check it out after the break.

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Norm Miller's curator insight, April 15, 2014 1:24 PM

Mixed use and density does lower resources per capita.  But this is the first estimate I've seen.

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Infographic: How Metro Compares To Other U.S. Transit Systems

Infographic: How Metro Compares To Other U.S. Transit Systems | green infographics | Scoop.it

From the University of North Carolina's School of Government comes this infographic that compares Metro against four other transit systems in major U.S. cities. There's even a comparison of complaints, with D.C.'s three being unreliable service, weekend track work and wait times, and faulty escalators. 

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The 10 Most Walkable Cities In America

The 10 Most Walkable Cities In America | green infographics | Scoop.it

About 30,000 sites now use Walk Score's walkability grading system. The Seattle-based company, has done a lot to encourage people to factor in walkability when deciding where to live.

Walk Score's latest ranking of America's most walkable cities shows the best from last year are still the best today. New York, San Francisco and Boston occupy the first three places, as they did last year. Philadelphia, Miami and Chicago come next. Each is classified as "very walkable," which means "most errands can be accomplished on foot." 

Walk Score assesses proximity to neighborhood amenities, crunching data for 10 million addresses and 2 billion walking routes. This year, it added a couple of extra criteria, including "depth of choice" in an area and "pedestrian friendliness."

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Four Infographics About Resilient Urban Systems

Four Infographics About Resilient Urban Systems | green infographics | Scoop.it

Cities across the globe are witnessing an increasing frequency of extreme weather events. This combined with population growth and urbanization means it is more crucial than ever that the systems that keep our cities functioning are resilient to the complex, uncertain and constantly changing risks that face them.

These four infographics are taken from the new report Toolkit for Resilient Cities, produced by Siemens, Arup and Regional Plan Association (RPA), and feature urban resilience from the perspective of the electricity grid, water systems, buildings and transport.

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The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic

The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic | green infographics | Scoop.it

Have you ever wondered where you or your children may be living in 2050?
Experts predict that by then three-quarters of the world's population will live in cities. For part of its 
Tomorrow's Cities season the BBC takes a look through the crystal ball to imagine what city life might be like in 40 years' time.

Find more details at the interactive graphic at the link.

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, August 23, 2013 4:15 PM

Here's some ideas on how we might live in the future. What do you think?

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Imagining A Future City Filled With Driverless Cars And Without Any Parking Spaces

Imagining A Future City Filled With Driverless Cars And Without Any Parking Spaces | green infographics | Scoop.it

As self-driving cars move from fantasy to reality, what kind of effect will they have on cities?

A research and urban prototyping project called Shuffle City investigates, and in the process, becomes a manifesto for a new kind of modern city--one that depends less on traditional public transportation like buses or light rail and more on creating a fleet of continuously moving automated vehicles to serve urban mobility needs.

Shuffle City looks at the new possibilities that could arise from cities transitioning to cars without drivers. If cars were put into some constant flow as a public good, and if people didn’t all have their own vehicles, there would be no need for the concrete wastelands and lifeless towers that serve as a parking infrastructure in the urban landscapes of car-centric cities like Phoenix and Los Angeles (Under the current ownership model, the average car spends 21 hours per day parked.)

The share of city space ruled by parking lots will shrink, making way for more green space, environmental buffers, workspace, housing, retail, and denser planning for more walkable cities...

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José Antônio Carlos - O Professor Pepe's curator insight, August 7, 2013 8:41 AM

Um desenho da cidade de nossos sonhos. Carros sem motoristas, ruas sem espaço para estacionamento, e por aí vai.

Kim Spence-Jones's curator insight, August 8, 2013 2:53 AM

Interface between cars and homes is an interesting area of R&D. Everything from entertainment synchronising to battery management.

miguel sa's curator insight, September 4, 2013 4:17 PM

Jacque Fresco has been talking about this sort of thing for awhile now, looks like its coming closer to reality~ 

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Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic)

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | green infographics | Scoop.it

For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future.

In the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned “arcology” - a word that combines “architecture” and “ecology," with a goal of building structures to house large populations in self-contained environments with a self-sustaining economy and agriculture.
 
“In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri)
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luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 7:42 AM
For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future as giant structures that contain entire metropolises. To some, these buildings present the best means for cities to exist in harmony with nature, while others forsee grotesque monstrosities destructive to the human spirit. In the mid-20th century, engineer and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller imagined city-enclosing plastic domes and enormous housing projects resembling nuclear cooling towers. These ideas are impractical but they explore the limits of conventional architectural thinking.  Science fiction writers and artists often imagine future architecture that oppresses the human spirit. Megastructures such as the pyramid-like Tyrell Buildings of “Blade Runner” dominate a decrepit skyline. The decaying old city is simply covered with layers of newer, larger buildings in a process of “retrofitting.” Beginning in the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned a more humane approach. The word “arcology” is a combination of “architecture” and “ecology.” The goal is to build megastructures that would house a population of a million or more people, but in a self-contained environment with its own economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri) In 1996, a group of 75 Japanese corporations commissioned Soleri to design the one-kilometer-tall Hyper Bulding, a vertical city for 100,000 people. Existing in harmony with nature, the Hyper Building was designed to recycle waste, produce food in greenhouses, and use the sun’s light and heat for power and climate control.  The structure was designed for passive heating and cooling without the need for machinery. An economic recession put the brakes on the project and it was never built. Soleri’s arcology concept is being put to the test in the Arcosanti experimental community being built in Arizona. Construction began in 1970. When complete the town will house 5,000 people. Buildings are composed of locally produced concrete and are designed to capture sunlight and heat. To be built in the desert near Abu Dhabi, Masdar is a 2.3-square-mile (6 sq km) planned city of 40,000 residents. Buildings are designed to reduce reliance on artificial lighting and air conditioning, and the city will run entirely on solar power and renewable energy. Begun in 2006, the project is planned for completion around 2020-2025.
Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 9, 2013 5:44 AM

Amazing and beautiful analysis!! Believe it or not, the science fiction also has something to teach us about the city of tomorrow.

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By 2050, the Greenest City May Not Be in the First World

By 2050, the Greenest City May Not Be in the First World | green infographics | Scoop.it
Cities might be burning three times more energy in 2050 than they did in 2005—unless they act now.

Currently, more than half of the world’s people live in cities. Given the trend of jobs returning to urban centers, it may not be surprising that by 2030 the world’s cities will be home to 60 percent of the world’s population. Cities are adapting to accommodate the growing population by becoming sustainable and green.

Yet assuming that the current rapid pace of population growth continues, cities will be burning three times more energy per capita in 2050 than they did in 2005 despite their “green” efforts. Even with increasing favor toward public transport in the first world’s largest cities, the cities with the greatest opportunity to reduce energy use are those in the still-developing second world, particularly in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.

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Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities

Using Big Data to Design Smarter Cities | green infographics | Scoop.it
Architects and Planners across the country are harnessing the potential of Big Data to build information-laden city-scale models. By gathering and synthesizing such factors as traffic, energy usage, water flows, and air quality, the urban design field is hoping to layout smarter, more efficient, and more resilient forms of development.
more...
Hilary McEwan's curator insight, February 17, 7:17 AM

Having already made a huge difference to the landscape of the financial, public health and manufacturing sectors, it looks like we can expect Big Data to keep on trucking, so to speak, and right in to the major infrastructure decisions that drive our city planning.


But does it make sense to plan a city on digital footprints instead of real-time foot fall and the day to day needs of the population? Each of us behaves very differently online to how we live offline, so can turning that data into a streetplan really change the way we live for the better?

Juanma Holgado's curator insight, February 21, 4:57 AM

Big Data i arquitectura, la construccio inteligent de la ciutat cercant eficiencia i sostenibilitat

Norm Miller's curator insight, February 23, 11:23 PM

This is like BMS but for cities.   It makes sense.  

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Flowing Maps Explore the City's Impact on the Local Environment

Flowing Maps Explore the City's Impact on the Local Environment | green infographics | Scoop.it

Digital artist and illustrator Istvan has created a series of maps which artfully imagine the affect of cities and their human inhabitants on the local environment. His colorful images aren’t scientific in nature, but rather a personal exploration of what it might look like if the energies of the metropolis flowed out of the city itself.

“I wanted to represent the influence of cities on their environment as a kind of invisible fluid that overflows from the city to its surrounding.”

The flow of each city map was digitally rendered using local terrain to simulate the erosion flow Istvan desired, then reworked in Photoshop to create a unique identity for each place. The final images were printed on 70cm square acrylic glass.


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The 2014 GOOD City Index

The 2014 GOOD City Index | green infographics | Scoop.it
GOOD's annual breakdown of the most inspiring cities in the world.

'The heartbeat of a city is a difficult thing to measure. Some, like physicists Geoffrey West and Luis Bettencourt, say you can measure a city by the precise pace at which its citizens walk. Others think a city’s true worth lies in the cost of its housing, or the growth of its population, or the fiscal outlook of its property developers. At GOOD, we believe that a city’s heartbeat is best measured in “possibility”—the pervading sense that though a place may be far from perfect, its citizens are taking a bold stake in its future through a mixture of creativity, hustle, and civic engagement.'

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Suzette Jackson's curator insight, May 29, 6:10 AM

How do you measure a #good #city?

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Colourful City Clock Diagram Depicts The Pulse Of The City

Colourful City Clock Diagram Depicts The Pulse Of The City | green infographics | Scoop.it

The folks over at Spacing Vancouver have compiled this multi-layered diagram which depicts the operating hours of every business within 200m from the Broadway-City Hall station on Cambie Street. The purpose of this time diagram is to show how "this continuous flow orchestrates the city's metabolism." Check out the complete story from Spacing Vancouver over here.

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Cities Leading the Way in Solar Energy [infographic]

Cities Leading the Way in Solar Energy [infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it
Since 2002, the U.S. has increased its installed solar photovolatic capacity by a factor of 200. Which cities are leading the way?

The U.S. now has more than 200 times the amount of installed solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity than it did in 2002, according to a new report from Environment America, and the top 20 cities for this capacity contain more solar power today than the amount installed for the total country six years ago. "Shining Cities: At the Forefront of America's Solar Energy Revolution" looks at which metropolises were in the lead of PV capacity in 2013, and what cities top the country when it comes to capacity per capita. The top cities may not necessarily be the locales you expect, but this data may highlight potential markets that are hot for building PV installations.

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9 Charts That Tell You Where Life Is Pretty Terrific

9 Charts That Tell You Where Life Is Pretty Terrific | green infographics | Scoop.it

The Paris-based think tank known as the OECD is just out with its semi-annual survey of how different economies stack up in terms of social well-being. (Well-being is basically the polite way economists talk about happiness.) The organization even has a new data visualization to let you see where your country ranks in certain key measures.

Called "Society at a Glance," the report is well worth a read. But here are some of the most interesting bits of data we found, in no particular order.

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Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, March 20, 2014 11:47 AM

Un análisis de datos a la VENA!

Russell Roberts's curator insight, March 22, 2014 11:20 AM

Thanks to reporter Matt Phillips of "The Atlantic Cities" website for this revealing set of bar graphs. The data were compiled by the French think tank "OECD" and showed where nations placed on the "social well being" or happiness scale.  The United States didn't do well in a number of areas...perhaps this is something our political leadership should study before they pass legislation that costs us much but delivers so little.    Aloha, Russ.

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2013's Best Performing American Cities

2013's Best Performing American Cities | green infographics | Scoop.it
New rankings from the Milken Institute show just how diverse our tech economy has become.

To the casual observer, the narratives of economic growth in American cities seem fairly obvious: the Sunbelt is adding people, the Rustbelt is failing, and big cities like New York, Chicago, Boston and D.C. are coming back. But the reality is far more complicated once you start adding real-world statistics into the picture.

Each year, the Milken Institute’s "Best Performing Cities" index injects some much-needed clarity into the debates surrounding metro growth and decline. An "outcomes-based" ranking, the report takes into account both short and long-term growth in job numbers, wages and salary, and the concentration and size of high-tech industries — an increasingly important part of success in today’s knowledge-driven economy.

The result is a data-driven look at economic growth in America's 200 largest metropolitan areas.

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The 10 Most Bike-Friendly Cities in the U.S.

The 10 Most Bike-Friendly Cities in the U.S. | green infographics | Scoop.it
Based on the number of bike facilities per square mile, San Francisco is the best city for bikers in the United States.


According to new data, the city has 5.6 bike-able miles per square mile, including on-street bike lanes, multi-use bike paths and signed bike routes. Residents of Austin, Texas, Long Beach, Calif., and Philadelphia rank right below San Francisco.

This annotated map of the U.S., made by Statista, shows the 10 cities in the U.S. with the most bike facilities per square mile, according to data from the Alliance for Biking and Walking.

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Bhopkins's curator insight, November 23, 2013 8:42 AM

10 cities with the most bike facilities per square mile - Baltimore is not on the list.

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The Neighborhood Data Portal Every City Needs

The Neighborhood Data Portal Every City Needs | green infographics | Scoop.it
Los Angeles rolls out interactive neighborhood health profiles covering everything from crime stats to obesity rates.

As the open data movement has matured, public city-wide vital stats have come to feel more like a citizen's right than a civic innovation. This is where things should head next: Take all of that data, map it, connect the dots between public health, land use, economics, education, crime and housing. And portray those patterns – and the inequality they often reveal – down to the neighborhood level.


Los Angeles has recently done just this, rolling out a web tool as part of its Plan for a Healthy Los Angeles that maps a tremendous number of metrics about life in the region, at both the city and neighborhood scales. Just a sampling of the dozens of metrics, via the portal from the L.A. Department of City Planning, the L.A. County Department of Public Health and The California Endowment:

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Infographic: How Our Cities Are Shaping Us

Infographic: How Our Cities Are Shaping Us | green infographics | Scoop.it

Architects and city planners are becoming more and more familiar with the health effects of our built environment.  This to-the-point infographic, designed by Chris Yoon, cites a few ways in which mid-20th century city planning trends have contributed to a growing obesity problem in the United States.  This data has alarmed scientists, planners and city officials into stressing the importance of redesigning the physical spaces so as to encourage physical activity and healthy choices.


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Top 6 Cities Leading The Green Building Revolution | Infographic

Top 6 Cities Leading The Green Building Revolution | Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

Find our which cities are leading the green building revolution--what's working and what they could do better.

Most people agree that green building makes sense–environmentally and financially, and we’re now designing buildings with materials and technologies that conserve energy automatically.


This infographic compares the efforts of six leading cities–New York, Vancouver, Copenhagen, London, Amsterdam and Stockholm–providing a bird’s eye view of  how cities are embracing the green revolution in the race to drastically reduce global CO2 emissions.

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