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green infographics
creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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New York Is the World's Most Wasteful Megacity, in 3 Charts

New York Is the World's Most Wasteful Megacity, in 3 Charts | green infographics | Scoop.it

New York, many say, is the greatest city in the world. It also might be the most wasteful.

That's according to a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The large research team, led by Christopher A. Kennedy of the University of Toronto, examined how 27 "megacities" (metropolitan areas with more than 10 million people) metabolize resources and create waste. Together these monster cities consume 9.3 percent of the world's electricity and produce 12.6 percent of the world's waste—even though they contain only 6.7 percent of the world's population.

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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, May 7, 10:12 PM

“The New York metropolis has 12 million fewer people than Tokyo, yet it uses more energy in total: the equivalent of one oil supertanker every 1.5 days,” he said. “When I saw that, I thought it was just incredible.”

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All of Earth's land mammals by total weight in one graph

All of Earth's land mammals by total weight in one graph | green infographics | Scoop.it

Randall Munroe, a former NASA roboticist who nows draws clever geeky webcomics at XKCD, used data from Vaclav Smil's The Earth's Biosphere: Evolution, Dynamics, and Change ("plus a few other sources") to create a visualization of all of Earth's land mammals, which include us, by weight. It does certainly put things in perspective, especially when you compare wild land mammals to us and our livestock and pets.

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Global warming in one unmistakably compelling chart

Global warming in one unmistakably compelling chart | green infographics | Scoop.it
If you have any doubt the balance of the globe has warmed over the last century, view this chart.


Produced by NASA, the chart illustrates how temperatures have compared to “normal” from 1880 to present, from pole to pole.

From the 1880 to the 1920s, blue and green shades dominate the chart, signaling cooler than normal temperatures in that era.  Then, from the 1930s to the 1970s, warmer yellow, oranges, and reds shades ooze in, balancing the cooler shades.

The rapid warming at the northern high latitudes especially jumps out in recent decades, reflecting “Arctic amplification” or more intense warming in the Arctic.  Although the warming is most pronounced up north, it is apparent at almost every latitude.

But since the 1970s, the blue and green shades rapidly erode and oranges and reds take over, dramatically.

Find more information at the link...

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IOANNIS APOSTOLOU's curator insight, September 13, 2013 9:26 AM

Global warming facts!

Owen Roberts, BSc, MBA's curator insight, September 23, 2013 8:16 AM

GLOBAL WARMING - Here is an chart developed by NASA that shows how much global temperatures have changed during the last 140 years.  Quite compelling. 

Hein Holthuizen's comment, September 29, 2013 4:00 AM
There is no doubt about an general increase of temperature. Whether it is worrysome is not to be seen on this small scale. We had colder periodes like ice ages and now we are likely in a interglacial. So global temperatures change over time. Nice picture btw.
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Green Building to Accelerate, Survey Finds

Green Building to Accelerate, Survey Finds | green infographics | Scoop.it

Construction companies worldwide are shifting their business toward green building, with 51 percent of respondents to a survey by research firm McGraw-Hill Construction saying they expect more than 60 percent of their work to be green by 2015.

This is a significant increase from the 28 percent that said the same for their work in 2013 and the 13 percent in 2008, according to the company’s latest SmartMarket Report, World Green Building Trends.

This trend is not localized to one country or region; fom 2012 to 2015, the number of firms anticipating that more than 60 percent of their work will be green more than triples in South Africa; more than doubles in Germany, Norway and Brazil; and grows between 33 and 68 percent in the United States, Singapore, the United Kingdom, the United Arab Emirates and Australia, the report says...

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Jim Gramata's curator insight, March 5, 2013 8:50 PM

I think this will be the true global tipping point once big business sees there is so much money to be made in the green movement. It remains to be seen if that ends up being a good thing but the momentum is shifting and that is certainly good.

 

Mercor's curator insight, March 11, 2013 1:55 PM

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Charting Anticipated Solar Power Prices through 2025

Charting Anticipated Solar Power Prices through 2025 | green infographics | Scoop.it
A new survey of experts shows solar power will become much cheaper through 2025, while expanding greatly, but for these trends to continue for the long term will require a commitment to funding research.
Prices for solar modules—the part of solar panels that produce electricity—will continue to fall, in line with the long-term trend since 1980, according to a survey of experts by Near Zero, a nonprofit energy research organization.
To get a sense of what future prices for solar power are likely to be, as well as other challenges and bottlenecks that the industry faces, Near Zero conducted a formal, quantitative survey from leaders in the industry, universities, and national labs, as a means of formally collecting expert judgments on a topic. By aggregating forecasts made independently by a variety of experts, these results reflect the collective wisdom of the group about how the solar power industry is most likely to develop, and also help to characterize the range of uncertainty about the future...
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Solar expected to make up 40 percent of PG&E's renewable portfolio by 2020

Solar expected to make up 40 percent of PG&E's renewable portfolio by 2020 | green infographics | Scoop.it
Solar power, which makes up a tiny part of Californias overall energy mix, will account for the biggest piece of the states renewable energy pie by the end of the decade, according to the states largest utilities.

Last year, Pacific Gas & Electric got most of its renewable energy from wind, bioenergy, geothermal and small hydropower dams. Solar accounted for about 1 percent. But that mix is quickly changing, and by 2020, the San Francisco-based utility expects solar to account for 40 percent of its renewable portfolio.
California's aggressive "Renewable Portfolio Standard" law requires utilities to purchase 33 percent of their electricity from renewable sources by 2020. Bioenergy, geothermal, solar, wind, wave and tidal power and small hydroelectric dams -- which cause less harm to the environment than large hydro dams -- all count toward meeting the law...
But solar is the fastest-growing piece of renewable portfolios, driven by federal stimulus funding for large solar power plants, a drop in solar panel prices and a boom in the number of developers competing for long-term utility contracts in California...

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Charts: The rise of renewable energy

Charts: The rise of renewable energy | green infographics | Scoop.it

The world’s appetite for energy is projected to rise more than 50 percent by 2035 and renewables will be the fastest growing source.

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Clean Energy Trends 2014: New Solar Energy Capacity Exceeds Wind For First Time

Clean Energy Trends 2014: New Solar Energy Capacity Exceeds Wind For First Time | green infographics | Scoop.it

Clean Edge's latest report on the global energy market shines a spotlight on five key clean energy trends likely to shape future.

The landscape of the global renewable energy market continues to shift with changes in economic and social conditions and policies. While some renewable energy sectors – notably, solar photovoltaic (PV) deployment – experienced “dazzling growth, success and rising stock prices,” others saw a drop in deployments, as well as challenges on the policy and finance fronts, according to a global clean energy market report from Clean Edge, released March 26.


More details and data at the link.

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Open Data in Charts: Comparing the open society across countries

Open Data in Charts: Comparing the open society across countries | green infographics | Scoop.it

How open-data compares against other national metrics


The Open Knowledge Foundation has inaugurated an index of the most open-data-friendly countries. Britain and America lead. Yet comparing the index against GDP, corruption perceptions (from Transparency International’s annual ranking) and the UN Human Development Index uncovers surprising findings. The clusters and outliers suggest that for middle-income countries there is a link with open-data practices, but not among the richest countries. Likewise, some of the least corrupt countries are nevertheless middling in making their data open. Together, the charts suggest there is still a long way to go to get states to release their data openly...


Via Mark P
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All solar efficiency breakthroughs since 1975 on a single chart

All solar efficiency breakthroughs since 1975 on a single chart | green infographics | Scoop.it

The National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV), which is part of the U.S. National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL), maintains a chart that shows efficiency records for all kinds of research solar technologies of all types (thin-film, single-junction cells, multi-junction cells, organic cells, quantum dot cells, etc). Above is the latest version as of April 2013.


On it, you can see the steady pace of progress and how different solar cell compositions compare to each other. Of course, these record-breaking cells were probably very expensive to manufacture and made only in very small quantities, so don't expect to see efficiency numbers like these in commercial PV... But over time, yesterday's record-breakers become today's mass-market products, so all this progress isn't just for the sake of breaking records either.

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Why Carbon Footprints Matter: Calculating Your Impact

Why Carbon Footprints Matter: Calculating Your Impact | green infographics | Scoop.it
The energy that powers the world comes mostly from coal, gas, and oil, and that’s led us to CO2 levels over 390 parts per billion now, and climate change. We can think of climate change as a design question: where do we want to end up? Impact studies tell us what will happen to the planet as we warm up—it's basically a litany of horrors. At a 1.5 degree increase, we'll lose 10 percent of species. At 2 degrees, we'll lose 90 percent of coral reefs. At 3 degrees, 1 to 4 billion people will face water shortages, leading to war across the planet.
We need to each understand the basic math behind energy and climate change so we can reach the right solutions. We need a massive shift to renewable energy, and we also need changes in our everyday lives. One first step is understanding your own carbon footprint. 
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Duane Craig's curator insight, February 7, 2013 10:24 AM

It's strange how so many are concerned about leaving debt to the next generations, but unconcerned about leaving a compromised environment.

Mercor's curator insight, February 7, 2013 10:58 AM

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Electric Car's curator insight, February 8, 2013 3:56 AM

What is YOUR Carbon footprint?

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Map of the Day: Where Americans Use the Most Oil

Map of the Day: Where Americans Use the Most Oil | green infographics | Scoop.it
3.5 percent of U.S. counties consume more than 10 percent of the nation's oil.

America consumes a lot of energy. Counties play a large role in this overall consumption — and many of them contain large cities like Los Angeles and Chicago.

Deron Lovaas, the federal transportation policy director for the Natural Resources Defense Council, posted a map charting oil consumption by county on the NRDC staff blog Thursday.

The map is the product of a joint research effort of the NRDC, the Sierra Club, and the League of Conservation Voters to identify the most oil dependent locations across the United States.


As shown in the map (and accompanying list of national averages), oil consumption is geographically uneven and highly concentrated. Lovaas notes that "just 108 counties out of the nation's 3,144, or about 3.5 percent of the total consume more than 10 percent of the nation's oil." Not surprisingly, Los Angeles county had the most annual oil consumption, at nearly 1.9 billion gallons in 2010. Harris county, Texas, follows with 1.7 billion gallons, and Cook county, Illinois, takes third with 1.6 billion.

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Chart of the Day: Africa's Greenest Cities

Chart of the Day: Africa's Greenest Cities | green infographics | Scoop.it
A graphic in the Siemens African Green City Index offers a side-by-side comparison of some key environmental factors in fifteen major African cities.

Overall, cities from the south and north perform the best. Cape Town, Durban, Johannesburg, Casablanca, Tunis and Accra all rank above average on the environmental scale. Pretoria generates the most waste. Johannesburg and Cairo consume the most water. Accra is one of the densest cities, and Tunis uses the most electricity.

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