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creative, innovative + informative infographics to educate + inspire...
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United States Carbon Emissions: An Interactive Heat Map & New Research

United States Carbon Emissions: An Interactive Heat Map & New Research | green infographics | Scoop.it

When it comes to carbon emissions, don’t blame big cities -- blame the suburbs, says a new study from the University of California, Berkeley. The study, released Monday, found that population-dense cities contribute less greenhouse-gas emissions per person than other areas of the United States. However, these cities’ suburbs are so damaging to the environment that they effectively wipe out any climate benefits. The study will be published in science journal Environmental Science & Technology.


Using dozens of variables, researchers found that greenhouse-gas emissions -- largely from cars, trucks and other vehicles -- in the suburbs account for about 50 percent of all household emissions in the nation, even though less than 50 percent of the population lives in these areas.

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Infographic: Companies unprepared to address resource scarcities

Infographic:  Companies unprepared to address resource scarcities | green infographics | Scoop.it
New research shows that many businesses around the world won’t start planning until 2018. Is this too late?

Despite widespread warnings of resource scarcity over the next few decades, a significant proportion of global businesses are not prepared to address the predicted shortfall, according to new research by Carbon Trust.
The U.K.-based organization’s survey of 475 executives in the U.S., Brazil, China, Korea and the U.K. revealed while a majority acknowledged that their companies would have to charge more for their products and services as a result of resource constraints, 43 percent are not monitoring risks posed by incidents such as energy price increases and environmental disasters. Over 50 percent have not developed goals to reduce their company’s consumption of water, waste production or carbon emissions...

View the Carbon Trust infographic for more details on the survey.
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Duane Craig's curator insight, December 20, 2012 11:19 AM

And, the construction sector is woefully unprepared...

Jim Gramata's curator insight, December 21, 2012 10:37 PM

The earth is bounded and its resources finite. Hopefully it will be a proactive and not reactive decision to do what is critical to the sustainability of the earth. Spread the word....

Mercor's curator insight, January 31, 2013 9:50 AM

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The Hestia Project Maps Carbon Emissions of US Cities Down to Street Level

The Hestia Project Maps Carbon Emissions of US Cities Down to Street Level | green infographics | Scoop.it
A team of researchers from Arizona State University have developed a new software system, called Hestia, that is capable of estimating greenhouse gas emissions across entire urban landscapes, all the way down to street level and individual buildings.

The project, known as Hestia after the Greek goddess of home and hearth, allows the team to combine extensive public database “data-mining” with traffic simulation and building-by-building energy-consumption modeling.

According to researchers, Hestia’s increased detail and accuracy will help cities, and possibly even other nations, identify where an investment in energy and greenhouse gas savings would have the greatest impact...

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Reuse, Reduce and Relocate: minimize your environmental impact... [Infographic]

Reuse, Reduce and Relocate: minimize your environmental impact... [Infographic] | green infographics | Scoop.it
Although 'moving season' — mid-May through mid-Sept. — is behind us, the folks at MyMove.com have some thoughts on how to haul all of your worldly possessions from points A to B with minimal eco-impact.

Via Flora Moon
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Mercor's curator insight, February 8, 2013 8:38 AM

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Commuters: Be Green and Frugal

Commuters: Be Green and Frugal | green infographics | Scoop.it
With the recent spike in gas prices, conservation and gas credit cards are among the tools you can use to control costs and carbon emissions.

You may feel you’re forced to choose between being environmentally conscientious and staying within your budget. Well, you’re in luck. When it comes to transportation, you can often have your cake and eat it too. When you reduce your travel-related greenhouse gas emissions, you usually are being thrifty as well. It’s a win-win.

Transportation is the second largest source of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions; the electric power industry is number one. The focus here is transportation because as an individual, it is the sector in which you have the most control...

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Carbon map infographic: a new way to see the Earth move

Carbon map infographic: a new way to see the Earth move | green infographics | Scoop.it

How can you map the world to show global data in an immediately clear way? How can you show two datasets at once to see how they compare?

Kiln, a partnership of Guardian writer Duncan Clark and developer Robin Houston has come up with this beautiful new take on the globe. Watch the animated intro or click on the topics and see the map move before your eyes. Adding shading lets you compare two datasets to see how they relate – so you can see clearly how poorest countries have the fastest growing populations but the lowest emissions...

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How Much CO2 Is Created By… | GE Data Visualization

Charging you cellphone or preparing a cup of tea: play around with this visualization to find out how much carbon is released by various activities!


Via J. Campbell
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Why Carbon Footprints Matter: Calculating Your Impact

Why Carbon Footprints Matter: Calculating Your Impact | green infographics | Scoop.it
The energy that powers the world comes mostly from coal, gas, and oil, and that’s led us to CO2 levels over 390 parts per billion now, and climate change. We can think of climate change as a design question: where do we want to end up? Impact studies tell us what will happen to the planet as we warm up—it's basically a litany of horrors. At a 1.5 degree increase, we'll lose 10 percent of species. At 2 degrees, we'll lose 90 percent of coral reefs. At 3 degrees, 1 to 4 billion people will face water shortages, leading to war across the planet.
We need to each understand the basic math behind energy and climate change so we can reach the right solutions. We need a massive shift to renewable energy, and we also need changes in our everyday lives. One first step is understanding your own carbon footprint. 
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Duane Craig's curator insight, February 7, 2013 10:24 AM

It's strange how so many are concerned about leaving debt to the next generations, but unconcerned about leaving a compromised environment.

Mercor's curator insight, February 7, 2013 10:58 AM

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Electric Car's curator insight, February 8, 2013 3:56 AM

What is YOUR Carbon footprint?

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NYC's Daily Carbon Footprint Visualized

NYC's Daily Carbon Footprint Visualized | green infographics | Scoop.it

With one of the best public transportations systems in the world, individual New Yorkers tend to have smaller carbon footprints than typical Suburbanites, but with a population of over 8.2 million, the carbon footprint for the city itself is pretty outrageous.


This visualization shows what it would look like if all of the carbon dioxide emitted from vehicles, buildings, factories, and people could be captured in “bubbles.” Each turquoise orb represents one ton of CO2, which would fill a sphere with a diameter of 33 feet, and as of now two are released every second in the Big Apple!


Stop by the link to view the animated infographic...

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Don't Worry, Drive On: Fossil Fools & Fracking Lies

Don't Worry, Drive On: Fossil Fools & Fracking Lies | green infographics | Scoop.it
Two things never seem to change about crude oil: the constant warnings that our thirst for it is unsustainable, and the fact that we continue to use it...

 

These two troubling trends are issues which should be dealt with, and quickly, as this intriguing motion graphic from The Post Carbon Institute points out.
They make the case that in recent years the political rhetoric has increased, pointing to so-called “new” technologies as solutions to the un-sustainability of fossil fuels. One such technology, fracking, aims high pressure water and chemicals into our soils, releasing both oil and natural gasses. In fact an old technology, a multitude of problems arise from its use, not least of which is the pollution of ground waters and the destabilization of soils resulting in earthquakes in previously stable areas. As if that wasn’t bad enough, the technology is expensive to use and only begins to makes sense financially in a world with high enough fuel prices – the world of today.


Isn’t it time we start getting realistic about our true fuel situation? Watch the video at the link for more information, then check out The Post Carbon Institute to show your support...

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Brad Wells's curator insight, October 21, 2014 12:43 PM

This is info-packed...

Alex

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Breathing Earth: CO2 rates by country in real-time

Breathing Earth: CO2 rates by country in real-time | green infographics | Scoop.it
A visual real-time simulation that displays the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, birth rates, and death rates of every country in the world.

Breathing Earth, a real-time simulation displays the CO2 emissions of every country in the world, as well as their birth and death rates.
Although the CO2 emission, birth rate and death rate data used in Breathing Earth comes from reputable sources, data that measures things on such a massive scale can never be 100% accurate. Please note however that the CO2 emission levels shown here are much more likely to be too low than they are to be too high...

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Footspotting: Global Carbon Footprint Infographic

Footspotting: Global Carbon Footprint Infographic | green infographics | Scoop.it

As Sustainability month draws to a close, we've dug up a gem from the Coroflot archives: Stanford Kay's excellent infographic of global carbon emissions.

Kay's design succeeds in representing a potentially overwhelming set of data on several levels: some 200+ different countries are represented by bubbles, color-coded by continent, where the size of each is proportional to its carbon emissions.

Moreover, the arrangement of the bubbles completes the metaphor, adding a further dimension of scale to the graphic: it is difficult, if not impossible, to see the big picture when one is perusing the names of the individual countries. Thus, Kay's infographic also reminds us not to miss the forest for the trees.

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Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint

Visualizing the Global Carbon Footprint | green infographics | Scoop.it

One of the key things I reinforce in conversations about globalization is that the advantages are unevenly distributed and the negative externalities to the system are also unevenly distributed.  This clever infographic highlights both rather effectively. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Dale Fraza's comment, February 27, 2012 3:26 PM
Really surprised at a couple things:
1. Brazil's relative tinyness in comparison with the U.S. Guess I've always just heard bad things about Brazil in regards to deforestation and the like.
2. Just how much a formerly agricultural nation (China) has exploded. Something really needs to be done about the environmental havoc they are wreaking (not to be a total ethnocentrist or anything).