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Europe's Most Advanced Paper Recycling Plant Opened in UK - Waste Management World

Europe's Most Advanced Paper Recycling Plant Opened in UK - Waste Management World | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it

A recycled paper mill claimed to be the most advanced in Europe has been officially opened by Michael Fallon, the UK's minister of state for business & energy, at Partington Wharfside, Trafford.

Duane Tilden's insight:

SIACA said that the mill will help to some 450,000 tonnes a year of used paper from export by recycling it within the UK - reducing carbon emissions by 84,011 tonnes per year - equivalent to taking 28,000 cars off the road each.

 

Economic boost

According to the company PM-11 has led to the creation of 94 direct jobs plus opportunities for contractors and other roles.

 

"This cutting edge facility shows how state of the art technology and innovation can help drive growth. It’s a real boost for the economy and will create new jobs for Partington and the local area," commented Fallon.

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US Navy Builds Scale Model Aircraft Powered with Fuel From the Sea Concept

US Navy Builds Scale Model Aircraft Powered with Fuel From the Sea Concept | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
Navy researchers at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Materials Science and Technology Division, demonstrated pr
Duane Tilden's insight:

>"Using an innovative and proprietary NRL electrolytic cation exchange module (E-CEM), both dissolved and bound CO2 are removed from seawater at 92 percent efficiency by re-equilibrating carbonate and bicarbonate to CO2 and simultaneously producing H2. The gases are then converted to liquid hydrocarbons by a metal catalyst in a reactor system.

"In close collaboration with the Office of Naval Research P38 Naval Reserve program, NRL has developed a game-changing technology for extracting, simultaneously, CO2 and H2 from seawater," said Dr. Heather Willauer, NRL research chemist. "This is the first time technology of this nature has been demonstrated with the potential for transition, from the laboratory, to full-scale commercial implementation."

CO2 in the air and in seawater is an abundant carbon resource, but the concentration in the ocean (100 milligrams per liter [mg/L]) is about 140 times greater than that in air, and 1/3 the concentration of CO2 from a stack gas (296 mg/L). Two to three percent of the CO2 in seawater is dissolved CO2 gas in the form of carbonic acid, one percent is carbonate, and the remaining 96 to 97 percent is bound in bicarbonate.

NRL has made significant advances in the development of a gas-to-liquids (GTL) synthesis process to convert CO2 and H2 from seawater to a fuel-like fraction of C9-C16 molecules. In the first patented step, an iron-based catalyst has been developed that can achieve CO2 conversion levels up to 60 percent and decrease unwanted methane production in favor of longer-chain unsaturated hydrocarbons (olefins). These value-added hydrocarbons from this process serve as building blocks for the production of industrial chemicals and designer fuels.

In the second step these olefins can be converted to compounds of a higher molecular using controlled polymerization. The resulting liquid contains hydrocarbon molecules in the carbon range, C9-C16, suitable for use a possible renewable replacement for petroleum based jet fuel. 

The predicted cost of jet fuel using these technologies is in the range of $3-$6 per gallon, and with sufficient funding and partnerships, this approach could be commercially viable within the next seven to ten years. Pursuing remote land-based options would be the first step towards a future sea-based solution."<

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Radical beverage refrigeration technology cools on demand

Radical beverage refrigeration technology cools on demand | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
UK-based Pera Technology has developed a new refrigeration technology known as V-Tex, which has the ability to cool drinks while consuming less energy.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>The V-Tex has the ability to cool a standard 35cl can of drink in just 45 seconds, the company claims.

Paul Tattersall, project manager at Pera Technology, said: "The energy consumed by commercial refrigerators and freezers is quite staggering. Across Europe, an estimated 85TWh of electricity is used, comparable to around 25 million households. [...]

 

The Rapidcool consortium set out to develop a novel, fast-cooling apparatus that cools drinks on demand. This is a much smarter alternative to the current norm, where large volumes of drinks are stored in chillers for prolonged periods, just waiting to be consumed. This not only wastes a lot of energy, but chilled stock can easily run out. V-Tex technology is flexible and ensures consumers can always obtain a cooled beverage quickly.

The main challenge faced by the team was to optimise cooling efficiency to meet consumer demand for extremely fast cooling without 'slushing'. This occurs when the outer layers of liquid freeze before the inner liquid is cooled. The V-Tex technology rotates the drink under optimised conditions to create a 'Rankine vortex' and obtain cooling speeds better than other approaches while avoiding the effects of slushing and fizzing when the drink is opened. The cooling chamber can be easily integrated into existing vending machines or open-cabinets, in addition to working as a standalone cooling unit.<

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RISC vs. CISC explained for data center systems

CISC processors suit virtually every task, but RISC processors can do more with less power. The RISC vs. CISC battle has moved into the data center, with compelling pros for RISC.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>RISC vs. CISC processors

Today's x86 processor designs are an amalgamation of features and functionality from the last 30 years, right up to today's Intel-VT and AMD-V instructions to support hardware-assisted virtualization.

But there's a problem with this complex instruction set computing (CISC) approach; every new instruction or feature adds tens of thousands of transistors to the processor die, adding power demands and latency even if the instructions are rarely used. The chip is extremely versatile, but it runs hot and sucks power with ever-increasing clock speeds.

Processors run much more efficiently when tailored to a specific task. Reduced instruction set computing (RISC) strips out unneeded features and functionality, and builds on task-specific capabilities. Simpler, more reliable RISC processors provide the same effective computing throughput at a fraction of the power and cooling.

The question in CISC vs. RISC arguments is versatility vs. efficiency. Traditional x86 CISC processors can tackle almost any computing task using an extraordinarily comprehensive instruction set. This made CISC the preferred chip design for general-purpose computing platforms: enterprise servers, desktop PCs and laptop/notebook systems.

Purpose-built RISC processors sacrifice versatility for efficiency. Removing unneeded instructions dramatically reduces the processor's transistor count. Tackling fewer tasks in hardware means those tasks are performed faster, even at lower clock speeds (less power) than a full x86 CISC counterpart.

Printers, home routers, and even multifunction telephones and remote controls use RISC processors, and the concept is growing dramatically for fully featured computing platforms. A tablet or smartphone's RISC processor can deliver smooth video playback, fast webpage display and a responsive user interface for many hours on a battery charge, with no cooling devices. This same chip design paradigm is systematically finding traction in data center systems.<

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Microgrids & The Future Of Energy

Microgrids & The Future Of Energy | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it

Since most of the world has taken electric lights, air conditioning, ubiquitous power outlets and so on for granted for several generations, it’s easy to forget that more than 1.5 billion people on the planet—about one person in five—still live without electricity.

 
Duane Tilden's insight:

>Microgrids are also gaining in popularity in advanced countries. For one thing, they are viewed as a source of standby power in the event of natural disasters, like Japan’s 2011 Fukushima earthquake or the U.S. east coast’s Hurricane Sandy in 2012. The Sendai microgrid, located on the campus of Tohoku Fukushi University in Japan, had been built as a prototype in 2004, but received global attention when it continued to provide electricity to the campus after the 2011 earthquake, even as much of the surrounding area remained powerless.

 

For institutions like hospitals that must remain open 24/7 no matter what, emergency power has long been available in the form of standby diesel generators that kick on in the event of blackouts. But now, many of these facilities are designing other kinds of backup systems that have lower carbon footprints. For example, the new emergency-power generator at the Markham-Stouffville regional hospital in Toronto will be fueled by natural gas, now in abundant supply. While these are not full-fledged microgrids, they nonetheless take advantage of many of the technology breakthroughs that are allowing larger microgrids in sites like Tanjung Batu Laut.<

 
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Scientists Convert Algae into Crude Oil in Less than One Hour

Scientists Convert Algae into Crude Oil in Less than One Hour | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory engineers a way to turn algae into usable crude oil without a million years wait or harmful and expensive chemicals.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>Department of Energy scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory say they’ve reduced nature’s million year process of turning algae into crude oil to one than takes less than an hour. The engineers created a chemical process that produces crude oil minutes after it is poured into harvested algae. The reaction is not only fast, but also continuous since it produces a recyclable by product containing phosphorus that can then be used to grow more algae.   [...]

The scientists say with additional conventional refining, the crude algae oil can be converted into a variety of fuels for aviation, gasoline burning cars, or diesel vehicles. Meanwhile, the wastewater can also be used to yield burnable gas or elemental substances like potassium and nitrogen, which, along with the cleansed water, can grow more algae.

The new process promises to reduce time and save money compared to other techniques by combining several chemical steps and skipping the process of drying out the algae. Instead, the new process uses a slurry that contains as much as 80 to 90 percent water while eliminating the need for complex processing solvents like hexane to extract the energy rich oils from the algae. Elliott said in addition to saving time, “there are bonuses, like being able to extract usable gas from the water and then recycle the remaining water and nutrients to help grow more algae, which further reduces costs.”<




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Jarod Zeckowski's curator insight, March 3, 11:01 AM

6) a million year natural process is turned into minutes in a lab.

 

7) Algae has long been considered a potential biofuel

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USDA, US Navy Unveil Farm to Fleet Program Shift to Biofuels Blends

USDA, US Navy Unveil Farm to Fleet Program Shift to Biofuels Blends | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
In Washington, U.S.Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack and Navy Secretary Ray Mabus unveiled the “Farm to Fleet” program, through which the Navy will begin to add biofuels into its regular domestic purchases of approximately 77 million gallons of...
Duane Tilden's insight:

>The Navy’s Transition to Biofuels: Testing and Certification

The Navy began testing aviation biofuels and marine biofuels on a ship-by-ship and jet-by-jet basis several years ago. Last summer, the Navy demonstrated a Green Strike Group operating on biofuels during the 2012 RIMPAC exercises.[RIMPAC is the world's largest international maritime warfare exercise, held every two years out of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, hosted by the US Pacific Fleet and featuring 22 nations and 42 ships in 2012, enhancing interoperability between Pacific Rim armed forces].

“It was at RIMPAC,” McGinn observed, “that we really got an end-to-end view on all the supply chain issues. Now, we are ready to deploy quickly. Now, it’s down to business. The intention now is to alert industry that we are open for business and that we are starting this program in a very realistic way.”

The Navy’s Transition to Biofuels: Capacity Building and Assurance of Supply

Alongside the testing and certification efforts, the Navy, USDA and DOE had announced a program in 2012 to directly invest up to $510 million, through the DPA Title III office and Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), in order to assure that capital would be available to build production capacity and offset feedstock costs for drop-in biofuels that would meet the Navy’s needs, timelines and cost goals.

[Note for newer readers: DOE and DOD’s portion goes to DPA Title III to build biorefineries, USDA’s portion is in CCC funds to address feedstock development.]<

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ETI | ETI seeks proposals for a project to reduce district heat network costs

ETI | ETI seeks proposals for a project to reduce district heat network costs | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
The Energy Technologies Institute (ETI) is seeking proposals from organisations to deliver a new project to identify novel ways of reducing the capital costs of district heat network infrastructure.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>District heat networks supply heat to homes and businesses through pipes carrying hot water. They have great potential to deliver CO2 emissions reductions and cost benefits through the use of low carbon heat, waste heat (from power stations, industry and other sources), combined heat and power  and large-scale heat pump deployment.

The ETI’s project will assess innovative solutions to reduce the capital and total lifetime costs of heat network pipes, and to reduce any disruption caused during their installation.

The Request for Proposals (RfP) announced today (11 December) is focused on identifying innovative solutions. These may include advanced installation approaches; tunnelling, drilling and excavation techniques; alternative pipework and insulation materials; jointing techniques; pipe routing and novel system designs; planning; sub-surface detection technologies; plus other areas to be proposed.

It is expected that the project team selected will need to be made up of a number of organisations with experience and insight into district heat network delivery.<

 

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Fuel cell switched on at Cal State San Bernardino

Fuel cell switched on at Cal State San Bernardino | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it

A new 1.4 MW utility-owned a fuel cell is now in full operation at Cal State San Bernardino.

Duane Tilden's insight:

>"Electricity generated by the fuel cell is going straight into the Edison grid, and the university will be able to utilize the waste heat it produces to preheat the campus heating system, resulting in an estimated annual savings of $120,000 from avoided natural gas costs," said Tony Simpson, senior director of facilities services at Cal State San Bernardino.

The combined heat and power configuration —known as cogeneration — of the fuel cell will reduce the campus's carbon dioxide emissions by lessening reliance on the high temperature hot water generators currently in operation. The fuel cell will continue to use natural gas to generate ultra-clean electricity through an electrochemical reaction, but because there is no combustion, unhealthful emissions are reduced.

Additionally, the fuel cell is highly efficient, generating more power from a given unit of fuel and lower greenhouse gas emissions compared to combustion-based power sources in a similar size range. Cogeneration DFC power plants can achieve total thermal efficiencies up to 90 percent, depending on the application.<

 

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US Federal Government to Triple Use of Renewable Energy by 2020

Obama is set to announce plans for the federal government to source 20 percent of its electricity from renewables such as solar and wind by 2020.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>According to the AP, the “federal government occupies nearly 500,000 buildings, operates 600,000 vehicles and purchases more than $500 billion per year in goods and services,” which amounts to some pretty substantial emissions. Currently the government sources 7.5 percent of it’s electricity from renewable energy, but today’s announcement looks for that amount to triple to 20 percent within just seven years. (It is not presently clear how this ties into President Obama’s 2010 goal that the federal government cut carbon emissions by 28 percent by 2020).

So far there are few details as to how this goal is to be accomplished, but more optimistic onlookers might view this as one of the more promising developments in Obama’s oft-confusing “all-of-the-above” strategy for U.S. energy independence. Indeed, it follows an emerging trend towards renewable energy within individual sectors of federal government. The Department of Defense already has goals to meet 25 percent of its energy needs from renewable sources by 2025, while the government has invested $4 billion in making its buildings more efficient. These changes, among others, have seen federal agencies reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by 15 percent since 2009.<



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Obama approves border-crossing pipeline carrying corrosive fracked gas diluent to Alberta Tar-Sands

Obama approves border-crossing pipeline carrying corrosive fracked gas diluent to Alberta Tar-Sands | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
But the pipeline has problems with stress corrosion cracking. Is it safe to expand?
Duane Tilden's insight:

>Kinder Morgan Cochin LLC is now allowed to reverse and expand to build a 1,900-mile proposed pipeline to transport gas produced by hydraulic fracturing of the Eagle Ford Shale basin in Texas north into Alberta. It would carry gas condensate that is used to dilute the bitumen in the tar sands. The extra-thick oil produced in the tar sands needs to be cut with 30 per cent condensate so it can be carried, according to the Financial Post. 

The Cochin pipeline has had some safety issues in the past, however. Last year, the National Energy Board sent Kinder Morgan a letter regarding Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) failure in the U.S. back in 2003. At the time, the U.S. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) issued an order imposing a 20 per cent pressure restriction on the pipeline. Kinder Morgan later voluntarily imposed a further restriction on the operating pressure and received approval to increase  the operating pressure of the pipeline in US to 6895 kPa (1000 psi) in March 2012.<

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Spectrolab Breaks Own Solar Cell Efficiency Record

Spectrolab Breaks Own Solar Cell Efficiency Record | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
Spectrolab has achieved a new world record efficiency for a multi-junction solar cell.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>The Sylmar, California-based company’s previous record of 37.8 percent was set in April. Analysts Lux Research predicts that by 2022 Spectrolab cells could reach 50 percent efficiency. And Boeing says the new semiconductor bonding technology could be used to power spacecraft and unmanned aerial vehicles.<

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Clean Energy rebranded by DOE to Combined Heat and Power (CHP)

Clean Energy rebranded by DOE to Combined Heat and Power (CHP) | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
In a move that had been in the works for a while, the U.S. Department of Energy recently announced that its Clean Energy Application Centers have been rebranded as CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships, or CHP TAPs.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>The CHP TAPs maintain the same regional offices that existed under the former Clean Energy Application Centers:

Pacific (California, Nevada);

Southwest (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, Wyoming);

Northwest (Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington);

Midwest (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota);

Southeast (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee);

Mid-Atlantic (Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia); and

Northeast (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont).

With the new energy in these programs, now is the time to take advantage of the expertise offered by the Department of Energy and its CHP TAPs. Industrial users, municipalities, hospitals, college campuses and other large users of energy need to review and understand the significant benefits of CHP, district energy and waste heat capture technologies.<

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Albany County Sewer District unveils new heat and power system - YNN Hudson Valley

Albany County Sewer District unveils new heat and power system - YNN Hudson Valley | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it

Albany County Sewer District unveils new heat and power system YNN Hudson Valley The Organic Rankine Cycle captures waste heat from evaporated sludge to make electricity.


Via Microgen Concepts
Duane Tilden's insight:

>"It can reduce electric costs by $400,000 a year. It is much cleaner. It is going to reduce carbon emissions. So it will help the environment," said Ed Kear, NYSERDA Senior Project Manager.<

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UK Bioenergy: Dedicated Biomass Plants no Competition for CHP Plants

UK Bioenergy: Dedicated Biomass Plants no Competition for CHP Plants | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
As Ed Davey, U.K. Secretary of State for Energy & Climate Change, spoke to the Environment Council in Brussels, saying: “We call for urgent action on reaching an ambitious 2030 energy and climate change agreement, to spur on investment in green, reliable energy,” at home in Britain t
Duane Tilden's insight:

>"Biomass with CHP

In contrast with dedicated power only biomass plants, biomass-fired combined heat and power installations are continuing to attract investment in the UK, given that they still qualify for significant government support.

 

A number of these projects have made advances over the previous few months. For instance, RWE Innogy UK (formerly RWE npower renewables), is in the final stages of commissioning its Markinch Biomass CHP plant in Fife, Scotland. This 65 MW plant will supply up to 120 tonnes of industrial steam per hour to paper manufacturer Tullis Russell. RWE Innogy is investing some £200 million (US$300 million) in the development, which was built by Metso and Jacobs.

In October 2013 Estover Energy revealed that planning consent has been granted by Dover District Council for its proposal to develop a £65 million (US$100 million) biomass-fired CHP in the South East of England at Sandwich, in Kent. Generating 11-15 MWe and 8-12 MWth, the plant will use locally sourced low-grade wood as fuel.

Construction is forecast to begin in spring 2014 at the Discovery Park science and technology park.

And in the July, the Helius Energy-developed CoRDe biomass energy plant in Rothes, Speyside, Scotland began operations, using by-products from nearby malt whisky distilleries to produce renewable energy and an animal feed protein supplement, Pot Ale Syrup. Construction began in 2011 on the 8.32 MWe and 66.5 t/h pot ale evaporator plan. The total development and construction costs of the project were £60.5 million. ..."<

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Utility companies to continue mergers and acquisitions

Utility companies to continue mergers and acquisitions | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
Mergers and acquisitions in the U.S. electric utilities industry will maintain a steady pace over the next few years.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>Slower load growth is causing utilities to look beyond their service territories. Load growth has been moderating in recent years primarily because of greater energy conservation and efficiency, increased distributed generation and the 2008 – 2009 economic downturn. These growth trends have pushed some utilities to look beyond their service territories for additional load growth in areas that are growing faster than the national average.

Expanding regulated businesses and diversifying operations reduce risk profiles. Many utilities look to expand their regulated businesses to increase the stability and predictability of cash flows, while also maximizing operational efficiency and spreading operating and maintenance costs over a wider customer base.

Since many utilities are completing or currently at the peak of their capital spending cycle, they will look to diversify their business and attempt to identify new avenues of growth to increase their regulated asset base and earnings. Larger deep-pocketed utilities will also be better positioned to handle future capital expenditure cycles, including increasingly stringent environmental mandates.

Decline in ROEs will spur additional cost reductions, which can be achieved through merger synergies. Falling returns on equity (ROEs) means utilities are looking at consolidation to realize additional cost savings through operational synergies and reduced overheads.<

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Graphene Supercapacitors Ready for Electric Vehicle Energy Storage

Graphene Supercapacitors Ready for Electric Vehicle Energy Storage | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
Conventional batteries take so long to charge that they cannot efficiently store braking energy. Graphene supercapacitors store almost as much but charge in just 16 seconds.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>Now Santhakumar Kannappan at the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology in Korea and a few pals say they have a solution based on the wonder material of the moment–graphene. These guys have built high-performance supercapacitors out of graphene that store almost as much energy as a lithium-ion battery. They can charge and discharge in seconds and maintain all this over many tens of thousands of charging cycles.

The trick these guys have perfected is to make a highly porous form of graphene that has a huge internal surface area. They create this graphene by reducing graphene oxide particles with hydrazine in water agitated with ultrasound.

The graphene powder is then packed into a coin-shaped cell, and dried at 140 °C and at a pressure of 300/kg/cm for five hours.

The resulting graphene electrode is highly porous. A single gram of this stuff has a surface area bigger than a basketball court. That’s important because it allows the electrode to accomodate much more electrolyte (an ionic liquid called EBIMF 1 M). And this ultimately determines the amount of charge the supercapacitor can hold.

Kannappan and co have measured the performance of their supercapacitor and are clearly impressed with the results. They say it has a specific capacitance of over 150 Farrads per gram can store energy at a density of more than 64 watt-hours per kilogram at a current density of 5 amps per gram.

That’s almost comparable with lithium-ion batteries, which have an energy density of between 100 and 200 watt-hours per kilogram.

These supercapacitors have other advantages too. Kannappan and co say they can fully charge them in just 16 seconds and have repeated this some 10,000 times without a significant reduction in capacitance. “These values are the highest so far reported in the literature,” they say.<

 
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China hands 'death sentence' to 75% of solar cell makers- Nikkei Asian Review

China hands 'death sentence' to 75% of solar cell makers- Nikkei Asian Review | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it

SHANGHAI -- The Chinese government is pushing for a drastic shakeout of the country's overcrowded solar cell industry, supporting only a quarter of players and practically telling the rest to get out of the business. 

The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology has announced a list of 134 producers of silicon materials, solar panels and other components of photovoltaic systems as meeting certain conditions, as measured by 2012 production, capacity utilization and technical standards.


Via Pol Bacquet
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Virendra's curator insight, January 13, 9:05 AM

Finally how long  can  China stretch?  It could be taken as an early sign of implementation of proposed measures in third plenum refom agenda.
I guess we've started getting answers now.
Government's withdrawal of support from such companies will definitley make Indian manufacturer more competitive.

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Biofuel Start-Up Uses Drought Resistant Jatropha Plant Seeds

Biofuel Start-Up Uses Drought Resistant Jatropha Plant Seeds | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
Advances in molecular genetics and DNA sequencing technology have allowed a San Diego start-up to domesticate jatropha, a plant with seeds that produce high-quality oil that can be refined into low-carbon biofuel.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>Hailed about six years ago as the next big thing in biofuels, jatropha attracted hundreds of millions of dollars in investments, only to fall from favor as the recession set in and as growers discovered that the wild bush yielded too few seeds to produce enough petroleum to be profitable.

But SGB, the biofuels company that planted the bushes, pressed on. Thanks to advances in molecular genetics and DNA sequencing technology, the San Diego start-up has, in a few years, succeeded in domesticating jatropha, a process that once took decades.

SGB is growing hybrid strains of the plant that produce biofuel in quantities that it says are competitive with petroleum priced at $99 a barrel. Oil is around $100 a barrel.

The company has deals to plant 250,000 acres of jatropha in Brazil, India and other countries expected to eventually produce about 70 million gallons of fuel a year. That has attracted the interest of energy giants, airlines and other multinational companies seeking alternatives to fossil fuels. They see jatropha as a hedge against spikes in petroleum prices and as a way to comply with government mandates that require the use of low-carbon fuels.<

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Siemens awarded largest onshore wind power construction contract in Iowa

Siemens awarded largest onshore wind power construction contract in Iowa | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
Siemens has received an order from the U.S. energy company MidAmerican Energy for the supply of 448 wind turbines.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>Hamburg, 2013-Dec-16

Siemens to supply 448 wind turbines with a total capacity of 1,050 megawatts and provide service for several yearsThe customer, MidAmerican Energy, will equip five wind power projects in the U.S. state of Iowa with Siemens wind turbinesClean energy for nearly 320,000 American households

Siemens has received an order from the U.S. energy company MidAmerican Energy for the supply of 448 wind turbines. With a total capacity of 1,050 megawatts (MW), this represents not only the largest order for onshore wind turbines for Siemens, but also the largest single order for onshore wind power awarded globally to date. The wind turbines, each with a nominal rating of 2.3 MW and a rotor diameter of 108 meters, are to be installed in five different projects in Iowa. Siemens will also be responsible for service and maintenance of the wind turbines.<

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Geothermal Energy Association honors leaders in Innovation & Renewable Energy

The Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) in the US announced the winners for the GEA Honors, which recognize companies and individuals that have made significant contributions to advancing technology, spurring economic development and protecting the environment during the past year. 

 

Duane Tilden's insight:

>US Geothermal's 22 MW Neal Hot Springs Power Plant took the technical advancement prize. The facility, near Vale, Oregon, is considered the first commercial, supercritical Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) binary power plant.

TAS Energy designed, manufactured and installed the supercritical ORC binary power plant employing R134a, an organic working fluid that is non-toxic and non-flammable.

GeothermEx was recognized for its role in economic development and its "substantial contribution to the development of local, regional or national markets through the development of geothermal systems."

According to the GEA, the company excels in the facilitation of common understanding between developers and financiers. To date, GeothermEx's evaluations have enabled the development of more than 7,000 MW of geothermal power, the total financed to date exceeding $12 billion.

Dale Merrick of Canby Geothermal received the Environmental Stewardship award, which was presented in conjunction with the Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI).

" Dale Merrick has been a leader and visionary working to implement a community-based geothermal development project at Canby , California," the GEA said in a written statement. "The project would produce power and cascade the remaining energy to support an existing geothermal district heating system and future greenhouse and aquaculture businesses.

"If successful, Canby would be the first net-zero community in California and a model to the 71 communities in the state identified by the CEC as having a co-located geothermal resource. Projects like the Canby Geothermal System take many different types of support, and an advocate and visionary, like Dale Merrick, is essential. Canby Geothermal is a classic example of what a geothermal 'champion' and a supportive community can do, the industry association said.<

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Mining, Fracking, And Drilling Exploitation of Public Lands Exceed Natural Carbon Sink Processes

Mining, Fracking, And Drilling Exploitation of Public Lands Exceed Natural Carbon Sink Processes | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
A report released Thursday by the Center for American Progress finds that public lands in the continental United States are the source of 4.5 times more carbon pollution than they are able to naturally absorb.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>This imbalance is primarily due to the large quantities of coal, oil, and natural gas that are extracted from public lands. 42.1 percent of the country’s coal, 26.2 percent of its oil, and 17.8 percent of its natural gas are currently sourced from public lands both onshore and offshore.

Using data from the United States Geological Survey and Stratus Consulting, the CAP analysis determined that when combusted, fossil fuels extracted from public lands are the source of 1,154 million metric tons of carbon dioxide annually, while those same lands absorb only 259 million metric tons every year. As the authors wrote, the carbon sink that should be our national parks, forests, and other public lands is now “clogged.”

These findings are important considering that the first tenet of President Barack Obama’s Climate Action plan is to “cut carbon pollution in America.” The president’s “all of the above energy” plan, however, calls for continued expansion of mining and drilling on the 700 million acres of public lands managed by the federal government — contributing to high levels of carbon pollution.<

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Fortum inaugurates new waste-to-energy CHP plant in Sweden

Fortum inaugurates new waste-to-energy CHP plant in Sweden | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
The new power plant unit, Brista 2, produces district heat for local residents and electricity for the Nordic power market from sorted municipal and industrial waste.
Duane Tilden's insight:
>"Brista 2 is already the fourth CHP plant we have commissioned this year in the Nordic and Baltic countries. Combined heat and power production is at the core of our strategy, and whenever possible we utilise renewable and local fuels," says Per Langer, Executive Vice President of Fortum's Heat Division. Production capacity of the new Brista plant unit is 60 megawatts (MW) heat and 20 MW electricity. The annual heat production, about 500 gigawatt-hours (GWh), corresponds to the annual heating needs of about 50,000 mid-sized homes. The estimated annual electricity production of Brista 2 is 140 GWh. Fortum co-owns the plant (85%) together with the municipal energy company Sollentuna Energi (15%). <
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Renewable Geothermal Power - a Vast & Untapped Energy Resource

Renewable Geothermal Power - a Vast  & Untapped Energy Resource | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
There are no plans for new coal plants to be built in the United States. This opens doors for the geothermal industry possibly more than ever before in U.S. history.
Duane Tilden's insight:

> Geothermal energy is a renewable source of electricity that has the same important baseload qualities [...]  (of coal for) electric power generation in the U.S. at a fraction of the cost. 

“Baseload is always better,” [...] “[I]t assures a steady revenue stream which is much better for financing.”For a nation that’s thinking to the long term, geo plants are:

Firm. They can run 24 hours a day regardless of extraneous conditions.Flexible. Geothermal’s flow can be load following or allow for imbalance, can provide a spinning reserve or a non-spinning reserve, and works well as replacement or supplemental reserve.

Falcone says of geothermal’s flow options: “By being able to load follow, geothermal can be reduced during low need time and increased without much effort. There is no need to store power that cannot be used. The price of power can be kept lower than other renewables since more of it is sold than the intermittent power sources like wind and solar.”

Falcone adds, “There are now efforts to marry solar with geothermal so that extra power can be produced during sunny peak hours.

“There is no need to invest in fossil fuel to create heat in order to generate power, so the environment is better off.”But today’s solicitations for renewable energy in Western states tend to ignore these unique benefits of geothermal power. Additional long-term analysis shows geothermal plants are:

Small. Geothermal-impacted land in 2030 is expected to be around 7.5 km2/TW-hr/yr, as opposed to 9.7 .5 km2/TW-hr/yr for a coal plant.Hardy. Long-lasting geothermal plants include those at The Geysers in California (since the 1960s) and at the Lardarello field in Italy (since 1904).<
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NSF awards grant to Mechanical Engineer prof for underwater kite marine power research

NSF awards grant to Mechanical Engineer prof for underwater kite marine power research | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
A three-year, US$300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation will allow Worcester Polytechnic Institute associate professor of mechanical engineering David Olinger to conduct research on developing a new form of ocean energy.
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Duane Tilden's curator insight, November 11, 2013 9:37 PM

"The research builds on Olinger's prior research, funded by the NSF and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, in which he developed a low-cost kite system that used wind to generate power. Olinger and a team of graduate students developed computational models that predict trajectories and power output for kites of different sizes and tethers of different lengths, which can be used to design kites capable of flying in stable, high-speed figure-eight patterns under changing weather conditions.

The same algorithms can be applied to the design of underwater kites, Olinger said, but "instead of moving air, you have moving water and the kites have rigid wings."

Olinger will now evaluate possible designs for undersea kites and explore methods for tethering them to floating platforms similar to those used for oil and gas rigs.

WPI said the team will also examine the advantages and disadvantages of mounting turbine generators directly to the kites or placing the generators on the platforms. [...]

Olinger's kite system is similar to one already being developed by Swedish company Minesto, though a WPI representative said the two projects are not related."<

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Connecticut Storm Proofing with Micro-Grid Developments

Connecticut Storm Proofing with Micro-Grid Developments | Green Energy Technologies & Development | Scoop.it
Press Release Gov. Dannel P. Malloy announced Oct. 30 that nine towns that are part of a pilot microgrid program, including Windham and Storrs, are eligible for additional funding.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>A pilot microgrid program, administered by the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, was created under Public Act 12-148 to increase the safety and quality of life for Connecticut residents during electric grid outage situations.

 

Microgrids provide electricity to critical facilities and town centers on a 24/7, daily basis. They will also include a system of “trips” and “transfers” to isolate the microgrid and provide power within its network even when there is a large-scale outage.

 

The first round of the program awarded $18 million in grants to microgrid projects in Bridgeport, Fairfield, Groton, Hartford, Middletown, Storrs/Mansfield, Windham and Woodbridge as part of the Governor’s Storm Legislation.

 

Those projects are expected to become operational over the course of the next 18 months, with the first projects slated to come online in early 2014. [...]

 

“Our first-in-the-nation microgrid program is an essential tool to help minimize hardships to our residents and businesses when severe storms occur. We all know that it is not a question of if, but when the next super storm will strike, and it is essential we do everything we can to be prepared,” Gov. Malloy said.

 

Commenting on the additional funding, DEEP Commissioner Daniel C. Esty said, “It is essential to public safety that power be maintained to critical facilities and town centers even when the electric grid is down… Connecticut and the northeast continue to experience more severe and more frequent storms, so it is vital that the state aggressively pursues the development of microgrids statewide so that we are in a better position to provide critical services to the state’s residents and businesses.”<

 

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