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Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering
Green building design topics including the fields of Architecture, and the disciplines of Engineering.
Curated by Duane Tilden
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Net Energy Metering Policies Helping To Spur Solar Growth

All across the United States, rooftop solar panels are popping up on homes, businesses and schools like mushrooms in a forest, and utility-scale solar projects are bringing huge amounts of clean energy into our communities.  Why?
Duane Tilden's insight:

>Today, smart policies — likeRenewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) and Net Energy Metering (NEM) — are helping to fuel solar’s explosive growth. Our industry now employs 120,000 Americans at 5,600 U.S. companies. What’s more, we’re now generating enough electricity to power more than 1.5 million homes, including the White House!

 

Part of this amazing success story can also be attributed to the fact that the average cost of a solar system has dropped by nearly 40 percent over the past two years and by a whopping 50 percent since 2010.  As a result, American consumers, businesses and schools are flocking to rooftop solar.  According to the most recent statistics, the residential market alone grew by 48 percent in the second quarter of 2013 compared to the same time period a year ago.  That’s nothing short of remarkable.

 

NEM has significantly contributed to this growth.  Simply put, NEM is a credit on your bill that represents the full value of electricity delivered.  Think of it this way: surplus energy generated by a home or business system is exported to the electricity grid, allowing a consumer’s meter to spin backwards.  This allows the homeowner or business owner to have greater control over their energy use and prices.  That’s literally the definition of “consumer choice.”<

 
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Detroit Completes One of Nation's Largest LED Parking Garage Retrofits - WSJ.com

Sixty-one Acres of LED Lighting will reduce garage energy-use by 80 percent; Entire property by 7 percent
Duane Tilden's insight:

>LED technology is one of the highest performing, currently available methods of lighting. Energy savings of 50 to 80 percent are common when compared to the lamps that are typically used in garages. LED lamps also have much longer operating lives, resulting in fewer materials and transportation resources needed over time. The MGM Grand Detroit LED retrofit, will save enough electricity to power more than 350 average homes per year. [...]

 

Earlier this year, the company initiated a program to install 1,600 induction technology lighting fixtures covering 160 acres of open lot parking area at its resorts in Las Vegas. These lamps are ideal for the hot Las Vegas climate and will have an operating life of up to 20 years. An estimated 2.7 million kWh will be saved annually following the project's completion.

 

Additionally, MGM Resorts recently announced the planned installation of one of the largest rooftop solar photovoltaic arrays in the world at the Mandalay Bay Resort Convention Center. The 6.2-megawatt installation will be MGM Resorts' first commercial solar project in the United States and will generate enough electricity to power the equivalent of 1,000 homes.<

 

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Air Conditioning the World stresses Global Energy Supply

Air Conditioning the World stresses Global Energy Supply | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it

The United States currently uses more energy for air- conditioning than all other countries combined—a sobering statistic from Stan Cox of the Land Institute in Salina, Kansas.

Duane Tilden's insight:

>According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, 87 percent of American households are equipped with air-conditioning, and the United States expends about 185 billion kilowatt hours of energy annually on residential cooling.  [...]

 

Rapid increases in the ownership of air conditioners are already occurring in many developing countries. According to research by McNeil and Letschert, the percentage of urban Chinese households with an air conditioner jumped from less than 1 percent in 1990 to 62 percent in 2003. In 2010 alone, 50 million air-conditioning units were sold in China.  [...]

 

[...] eight countries have the potential to exceed the United States’ yardstick of high air-conditioning usage, because of their warm climates and significant populations. Furthermore, the top three could surpass the United States by substantial amounts: India, China, and Indonesia by factors of 14, 5.2, and 3.1, respectively, if they adopt American standards of cooling.


[...] Several institutions have recently made major technical advances in the design of more energy-efficient air conditioners. For example, developments at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory suggest that efficiency improvements of 20 to 70 percent are possible compared to current models of air conditioners. Changes in housing design and urban planning are also needed [...]<

 
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Quantitative Analysis of Factors Contributing to Urban Heat Island Intensity

Quantitative Analysis of Factors Contributing to Urban Heat Island Intensity | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it
Ryu, Young-Hee, Jong-Jin Baik, 2012: Quantitative Analysis of Factors Contributing to Urban Heat Island Intensity. J. Appl. Meteor. Climatol., 51, 842–854.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>This study identifies causative factors of the urban heat island (UHI) and quantifies their relative contributions to the daytime and nighttime UHI intensities using a mesoscale atmospheric model that includes a single-layer urban canopy model. A midlatitude city and summertime conditions are considered. Three main causative factors are identified: anthropogenic heat, impervious surfaces, and three-dimensional (3D) urban geometry. Furthermore, the 3D urban geometry factor is subdivided into three subfactors: additional heat stored in vertical walls, radiation trapping, and wind speed reduction. To separate the contributions of the factors and interactions between the factors, a factor separation analysis is performed. In the daytime, the impervious surfaces contribute most to the UHI intensity. The anthropogenic heat contributes positively to the UHI intensity, whereas the 3D urban geometry contributes negatively. In the nighttime, the anthropogenic heat itself contributes most to the UHI intensity, although it interacts strongly with other factors. The factor that contributes the second most is the impervious-surfaces factor. The 3D urban geometry contributes positively to the nighttime UHI intensity. Among the 3D urban geometry subfactors, the additional heat stored in vertical walls contributes most to both the daytime and nighttime UHI intensities. Extensive sensitivity experiments to anthropogenic heat intensity and urban surface parameters show that the relative importance and ranking order of the contributions are similar to those in the control experiment.

 

Keywords: Urban meteorology

Received: May 7, 2011;<

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Gerard Taulé Codinach's curator insight, April 28, 1:11 PM

Girona té una població de 100000 habitants i per aquest motiu té una illa de calor urbana important, amb una intensitat  mitjana anual de 5,4º i una intensitat màxima de 12,1º, assolida el 31 de desembre de 2007 a les 20,20 hores.

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Waste to Energy - Incinerator Operations threaten Community recycling programs

Waste to Energy - Incinerator Operations threaten Community recycling programs | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it
Rise in number of plants burning waste may be disincentive to greener methods of disposal
Duane Tilden's insight:

>Experts said the use of incinerators had consequences for recycling as local authorities were forced to divert waste to feed the plants. "The choice to invest in thermal treatment can hold back recycling efforts," Adam Baddeley, principal consultant at Eunomia, said. "At one level, the money invested in such plant simply isn't available to put into building recycling plants or collection infrastructure. And once you've built an incinerator or gasifier, there's a strong incentive to keep it fed with waste, even if that means keeping on collecting as 'black bag' rubbish, material that would be economically practicable to collect separately for recycling."

 

Charmian Larke, technical adviser for Cornwall Waste Forum, which unsuccessfully opposed a large incinerator in the south-west, questioned the planning process that resulted in incinerators being approved. "Some of them [planning officers] have spent their entire careers trying to get this incinerator so they are wedded to the idea," Larke said. "But if the council members understood how bad these contracts were, the officers would lose their jobs."

 

Larke claimed that many of the incinerators were built in poorer areas. "There's a feeling that people who are downtrodden have a harder time getting their act together to object, and hence it's easier to place nasty things next to them."<

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Atmospheric Gas Features - free slide submission, upload slide - weSRCH

Atmospheric Gas Features - free slide submission, upload slide - weSRCH | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it
The features are satnding gas pilot and motorized stack damper. This burner type has high standby losses. Air can move through the boiler and up the stack 24/7.... , Atmospheric Gas Features - free slide submission, upload slide - weSRCH.
Duane Tilden's insight:

Educational slideshow.

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Water Stress Threatens Future Energy Production

Water Stress Threatens Future Energy Production | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it
When we flip on a light, we rarely think about water.  But electricity generation is the biggest user of water in the United States.  Thermoelectric power plants alone use more than 200 billion gallons of water a day – about 49 percent of the...
Duane Tilden's insight:

>Large quantities of water are needed as well for the production, refining and transport of the fuels that light and heat our homes and buildings, and run our buses and cars.  Every gallon of gasoline at the pump takes about 13 gallons of water to make.

 

And of course hydroelectric energy requires water to drive the turbines that generate the power.  For every one-foot drop in the level of Lake Mead on the Colorado River, Hoover Dam loses 5-6 megawatts of generating capacity – enough to supply electricity to about 5,000 homes.

 

In short, energy production is deeply dependent on the availability of water.  And, as a reportreleased last week by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) makes clear, as climate change brings hotter temperatures, more widespread and severe droughts, and lower river and lake levels, the nation’s energy supply is becoming more vulnerable. [...]

 

One particularly interesting figure in the report compares the water requirements of seven different types of electric power facilities – nuclear, coal, biopower, natural gas combined-cycle, concentrated solar, photovoltaic solar and wind.  The last two come out as by far the most water-conserving electricity sources.  In contrast to the 20,000-60,000 gallons per megawatt-hour needed for nuclear and coal plants with “once-through” cooling systems, PV solar and wind require only negligible quantities.<

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Swansea Bay hydrokinetic project continues moving forward

Swansea Bay hydrokinetic project continues moving forward | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it
Energy development group Tidal Lagoon Power Limited has reached a significant milestone in the development of a massive hydroelectric power project with the announcement of three design, build and deliver agreements.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>[...]According to TLP, the US$966.5 million project will consist of a 6-mile-long, 35-foot-high semi-circular sea wall that will enclose an area west of Swansea Marina.  The wall would be dotted along its length with a number of hydro turbines, giving the project a cumulative capacity of around 250 MW.

 

Each of TLP's three partners adds a unique quality to the project's development, the company said.  Costain will work in developing and managing the schedule for pre-construction and construction phases, developing construction methodology for civil engineering works including turbine and sluice structures, access routes and complex temporary works, including temporary bund for construction turbine housing.

 

Meanwhile, Atkins will provide engineering design and geotechnical expertise. TLP said this includes "designing both the turbine house and the innovate breakwater bund wall, which uses a combination of giant tubular sand bags protected by armor made up of different sized rocks."

 

Last, Van Oord is developing construction methodology suitable for the harsh off-shore conditions in Swansea Bay.

 

The Swansea is the first tidal lagoon power project envisioned by TLP, which said in May that it is considering a similar project off Wales' north coast. As much as 10,000 MW of tidal lagoon power potential in the United Kingdom, the group said. [...]<

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IBM Uses Hot Water To Cool Supercomputer, Saves Energy by 40%

IBM Uses Hot Water To Cool Supercomputer, Saves Energy by 40% | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it
IBM, in collaboration with the Leibniz Supercomputer Center in Munich, is using hot water to its SuperMUC supercomputer. This is not new for IBM. It
Duane Tilden's insight:

>The system, called LRZ “SuperMUC”, is based on an IBM System x iDataPlex Direct Water Cooled dx360 M4 server. It is said to feature 150,000 cores and provides peak performance of up to three petaflops. In layman’s language it could be described as something equivalent of the processing power of 110,000 personal computers.

 

IBM claims that the technique needs 40% less energy to cool this machinery as compared to the other air-cooling systems. The heat is then used for the heating systems of the Leibniz Supercomputing Center campus. This accounts for an annual savings of $1.25 million on their heating bills.<

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The 21st century data center: You're doing it wrong | ZDNet

The 21st century data center: You're doing it wrong | ZDNet | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it
Outdated designs are keeping data centers from reaching their full potential.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>One example of this are data centers that use raised floors for cooling. Many IT pundits have discredited this method of cooling as wasteful, including Schneider Electric's territory manager for the Federal government and the ACT, Olaf Moon.


[...]

Cappuccio notes that engineering firms that are consulted to build data centers know about the newer and more efficient ways to do things. But rather than try something new, they prefer the stock standard cookie-cutter approach to creating data centers because it's fast and easy, he said.


[...]

"I've seen a lot of data centers being built that are too big," says Cappuccio. "We're finding people with data centers that are three to four years old when they realise they have far too much space, and are still providing air conditioning to those areas. So they begin to shrink them, putting up walls, bringing down the ceiling so they don't air condition the extra space."


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Integrating Building into the Smart Grid

Integrating Building into the Smart Grid | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it
It will take time to get from point A, today’s grid and building technologies and power markets to point B, a Smart Grid with intelligent buildings and transactive markets, but it can be done.

Via Joan Tarruell, Stephane Bilodeau, Hans De Keulenaer, Diedert Debusscher
Duane Tilden's insight:

>Transactive energy will play a critical defining role in grid modernization and shaping the Smart Grid.  Buildings, as noted in last week’s article consume 40% of the nation’s energy.  And while building owners can justify purchase decisions on energy savings as well as sustainability values, there’s another crucial factor for building owners to invest in technologies that reduce energy use and deliver self-generation.  That reason is to address the increasing vulnerability of the electrical grid to momentary and sustained power outages to both natural and human causes.

 

Buildings and their occupants are impacted by grid-related power outages.  The negative impacts range from reduced work productivity and decreased occupant safety and health to reductions in lifestyle standards.  Just like real estate values are higher for green buildings with LEED recognition, in the future, buildings that are grid-hardened may command premium prices because they preserve delivery of services regardless of grid status.  It is a compelling new variable in value propositions for tenants and occupants.<

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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, June 2, 2013 6:13 PM

"A very important conference occurred in Portland, Oregon last week – the Gridwise Architecture Council hosted the first international Transactive Energy Conference.  The topic of transactive energy is so new that there’s no formal definition yet, but as the author of the Smart Grid Dictionary, here’s my suggestion.  Transactive energy is a software-defined, low-voltage distribution grid that enables market participation by distributed energy resources (DER) bidding generation of negawatts or kilowatts.  Transactive energy describes the convergence of technologies, policies, and financial drivers in an active prosumer market – where prosumers are buildings, EVs, microgrids, or other assets."

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DPR Construction's Phoenix Office First Net-Zero Energy Commercial Building in Arizona

PHOENIX, May 17, 2013 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- DPR Construction (DPR), a national technical builder specializing in highly complex and sustainable projects, announced today the achievement of net-zero energy consumption in its Phoenix Regional Office.

Duane Tilden's insight:

>The renovated 16,533-square-foot office building is located in Phoenix's Discovery Triangle at the corner of 44th Street and Van Buren. In less than 10 months, the team, which included national design firm SmithGroupJJR and global consulting firm DNV KEMA Energy and Sustainability, researched, designed, permitted, and built a highly-efficient, modern workplace with a number of innovative sustainability features including:

-- 87 operable windows working in tandem with the energy monitoring system to open and close based on the relative indoor and outdoor temperatures

-- 87-foot zinc clad solar chimney which creates a convection current to release hot air out of the building while drawing cooler air in

-- Shower towers that act as evaporative coolers by working together with the operable windows and solar chimney to regulate building temperatures

-- Twelve eight-foot Isis(R) Big Ass(R) Fans that enable free air flow within the office

-- 82 strategically positioned Solatubes(R) that nearly eliminate the need for artificial daytime lighting [...]<

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Untapped Market in Smaller Green Retrofits

Untapped Market in Smaller Green Retrofits | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it
While many "green" building techniques have become the norm for new construction, panelists at a recent ULI forum say significant opportunities exist for upgrading or retrofitting buildings with green systems and technology.

Via Sarah Jancot ESSEC
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Jessica Boriani's curator insight, May 7, 2013 10:45 AM

interesting, and surely, in order to have a more sustainable environment, we have to confront with the existing buildings. I am writing from Italy, and i think that along we the requirement of new smart near zero building we have to address the retrofit of the huge amount of industrial re-convertible buildings

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Call for Energy Efficient Air-Conditioning with Technological Development

Call for Energy Efficient Air-Conditioning with Technological Development | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it
Innovations could cut the growing amount of energy used for air-conditioning and refrigeration
Duane Tilden's insight:

>Conventional air conditioners employ refrigerants such as chlorofluorocarbons to absorb heat from the room to be cooled. That heat is then expelled outside, requiring electrically powered pumps and compressors. One idea to conserve energy is to replace coolant fluids and gases—which are often super-powered greenhouse gases capable of trapping more than 1,000 times more heat than CO2—with solid materials, such as bismuth telluride. A new device fromSheetak, developed in part with ARPA-E funding, uses electricity to change a thermoelectric solid to absorb heat, and could lead to cheaper air conditioners or refrigerators. Such refrigerators, which lack moving parts and are therefore less likely to break down, can be lifesavers in remote, rural areas for keeping medicines cool or food fresh.<

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DOE Regulations: Energy Efficiency Improvements for Motors cause Industry Challenges

DOE Regulations: Energy Efficiency Improvements for Motors cause Industry Challenges | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it

The United States has had efficiency regulations for industrial electric motors in place since October 1997, when the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct 92) set minimum efficiency levels for 1- to 200-hp general-purpose three phase motors. EPAct 92 was upgraded when the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) went into effect in December 2010. 

Duane Tilden's insight:

>Several years ago, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a technical study as to what could be done to raise the efficiency levels of “small” motors. After years of study and litigation, the Small Motor Rule was passed that covers two-digit NEMA frame single- and three-phase 1/3 through 3 horsepower motors in Open enclosures.

 

Although the Small Motor Rule seems simple, it has the effect of creating motors with much larger footprints, particularly on single phase designs where capacitor start/induction run motors may largely be discontinued in Open enclosures. In some cases, a TEFC motor may be more cost effective and smaller than an Open motor.

 The DOE is presently conducting another technical study on “medium” AC induction motors of 1- to 500-hp. In their study, DOE is evaluating a possible increase in nominal motor efficiency of 1 – 3 NEMA bands (approximately 0.4 to 1.5%) above NEMA Premium Efficiency levels as defined in MG 1-2011 table 12-12. Although this sounds simple to do, such a motor redesign could entail new laminations, winding equipment and in many cases, new frames to fit the extra material. Some designs may not fit where existing motor designs of the same ratings fit today. This means that OEMs would need to redesign their machine if that is an issue and end users may have trouble fitting the new higher efficiency replacement motor into their equipment or existing envelope.<

 

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Biofuel Production from Palm oil plantation waste

Biofuel Production from Palm oil plantation waste | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it
NextFuels to produce biofuels from palm plantation residue - Renewable Energy Magazine, at the heart of clean energy journalism
Duane Tilden's insight:

>Edible palm oil has surpassed soybean to become the largest source of cooking oil in the world, accounting for over 50 million tons of oil annually.

 

While plantation owners have managed to increase the productivity of their land by 15X since the late 80s, the growth of the industry has created a corresponding residue problem. Approximately 4.4 to 6 metric tons of agricultural waste is generated for each metric ton of oil. There are over 1,000 crude palm oil (CPO) mills in Southeast Asia and a single (60 tons per hour) mill can generate 135,000 tons of agricultural residue a year.

 

NextFuels uses a system called bio-liquefaction that efficiently transforms agricultural biomass to green energy. Biomass is placed into the plant mixed with water. The mixture is then heated to 330-degree Celsius while pressure is increased to 220 bar. Increasing the pressure keeps the water from coming to a boil, which conserves energy.

 

When cooled, the hydrocarbons form a putty-like substance called GreenCrude. Roughly 25 percent of the GreenCrude can be burned as a solid fuel in industrial boilers. The remaining 75 percent can be converted into a liquid-fuel equivalent to petroleum that is compatible with existing pipelines and vehicles.

 

The equipment required to convert GreenCrude into liquid fuels, in a process called hydrodeoxygenation, is already installed at most refineries and can... <

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NASA - Ecosystem, Vegetation Affect Intensity of Urban Heat Island Effect

NASA - Ecosystem, Vegetation Affect Intensity of Urban Heat Island Effect | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it
NASA researchers studying have found that the intensity of the "heat island" created by a city depends on the ecosystem it replaced and on the regional climate.
Duane Tilden's insight:

I have measured the heat island effect in the Greater Vancouver area, specifically Metrotown, Burnaby to be in the order of 6 deg C, during a late summer evening.

>"The placement and structure of cities -- and what was there before -- really does matter," said Marc Imhoff, biologist and remote sensing specialist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "The amount of the heat differential between the city and the surrounding environment depends on how much of the ground is covered by trees and vegetation. Understanding urban heating will be important for building new cities and retrofitting existing ones." 

Goddard researchers including Imhoff, Lahouari Bounoua, Ping Zhang, and Robert Wolfe presented their findings on Dec. 16 in San Francisco at the Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union.

Scientists first discovered the heat island effect in the 1800s when they observed cities growing warmer than surrounding rural areas, particularly in summer. Urban surfaces of asphalt, concrete, and other materials -- also referred to as "impervious surfaces" -- absorb more solar radiation by day. At night, much of that heat is given up to the urban air, creating a warm bubble over a city that can be as much as 1 to 3°C (2 to 5°F) higher than temperatures in surrounding rural areas. 

The impervious surfaces of cities also lead to faster runoff from land, reducing the natural cooling effects of water on the landscape. More importantly, the lack of trees and other vegetation means less evapotranspiration -- the process by which trees "exhale" water. Trees also provide shade, a secondary cooling effect in urban landscapes.

Using instruments from NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, as well as the joint U.S. Geological Survey-NASA satellite Landsat, researchers created land-use maps distinguishing urban surfaces from vegetation. The team then used computer models to assess the impact of urbanized land on energy, water, and carbon balances at Earth's surface. <

 




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Construction Materials Scarcities in India spurs alleged Mafia-Political corruption

In several areas, Indian rules and regulations make honest business impossible. The only choice is illegal business or no business.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>Sand is essential for construction. Sand, gravel and cement are mixed to produce concrete. But an acute sand shortage has been created by licensing and environmental bottlenecks. So, mafia groups are mining river beds illegally across India. It’s easy: one mechanical excavator can extract several truckloads of sand every night.

 

Sand helps retain monsoon water in river beds, releasing the water gradually in the dry season. Excessive mining endangers this. Central and state governments have detailed environmental rules for extraction, made even tougher by court interventions. Ideally, we should have environmentally safe mining that meets rising construction demand.

 

Instead we have grossly insufficient legal mining, huge illegal mining, sand scarcity for construction, and big illegal profits split between the mafia and politicians.

 

A former cabinet minister recently declared that political parties are now funded mainly by the mafia, not by big business. This again is part of the untold Durga Sakthi story.

 

Politicians used to demand bribes for mining licences. Now, they deliberately hold back leases to make sand scarcer, and more profitable. [...]<

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Integration: Net-zero energy design | Consulting-Specifying Engineer

Integration: Net-zero energy design | Consulting-Specifying Engineer | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it
-ASHRAE has a goal: net-zero energy for all new buildings by 2030. What do engineers need to know to achieve this goal on their projects?
Duane Tilden's insight:

>As net-zero energy and low-energy design projects become more prevalent, engineers must be prepared to collaborate with all members of a project team including architects, energy specialists, lighting designers, builders, and owners in order to accomplish net-zero energy goals with little to no cost premium. Is this possible today or will it take another 10 or more years to get there?

There are many examples of completed projects demonstrating that not only is this possible, but it has been done in all regions of the country using readily available building products and common construction methods. So what’s the secret? It’s all about the design.<

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Cambridge Plans Massive Energy Efficiency Retrofit

Cambridge Plans Massive Energy Efficiency Retrofit | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it
This medieval English city is investing $1.5 billion for energy upgrades for the entire city.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>It’s one thing to build super-energy-efficient new homes and offices – it’s another matter entirely to bring ancient buildings up to par. But the medieval university city of Cambridge, England, plans to do just that with a $1.5 billion retrofit program.

 

The newly launched Cambridge Retrofit Project aims to reduce carbon emissions from buildings 30% before 2050 through a massive, city-wide retrofit scheme.  [...]

 

While the primary goal is reduced energy consumption and carbon emissions, the program also aims to build up local businesses, create warmer homes and increase the value of properties.

 

Energy savings alone are expected to be worth $2.3 billion and the city’s carbon footprint, currently 830,000 tons a year, is expected to fall 1% a year, eventually reaching 500,000 tons a year as a result of the retrofit program.<

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Formal consultation commences on the world’s first purpose built tidal lagoon | Specification Online

Formal consultation commences on the world’s first purpose built tidal lagoon | Specification Online | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it
The formal consultation process has started on the world’s first purpose built tidal lagoon for Swansea Bay, with public exhibitions taking place at 18 locations around the Swansea Bay area until August 5.
Duane Tilden's insight:

>The proposed tidal lagoon will have a rated capacity of 240 Megawatts (MW), generating 400GWh net annual output. This is enough electricity for approximately 121,000 homes. 

In addition to generating electricity, the £650 million development will also provide visitor facilities and other amenities including art, education, mariculture and sporting/recreational facilities. The seawall is expected to be open to the public during daylight hours for walking, running, cycling etc, though access will be controlled in extreme weather.

LDA Design, the project masterplanners and landscape architects for Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon, has completed the coordination of exhibition material for the public exhibitions. As part of the formal consultation for the proposed Development Consent Order (DCO) application by Tidal Lagoon (Swansea Bay) plc (TLSB), a new, virtual 3D programme has been prepared, which shows the proposed lagoon in the context of Swansea Bay.  <

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Scientists Adding Color to Solar Panels

Scientists Adding Color to Solar Panels | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it
If you have noticed the design and layout of solar panels around, you would have thought a minute or two about its aesthetics. Though not too bad, the dark
Duane Tilden's insight:

>The Institute is developing a SIS (semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor) variety solar panel. The package consists of a silicon substrate which absorbs light and converts it into electricity.[...]

 

The change in color does not make solar cells less efficient. The cell’s working is also not affected by the thickness of the conductive oxide layer. The SIS cell has the same simulated efficiency of around 20%.

 

The technology might later on use a type of inkjet printing that deposits the oxide layer with more flexibility, which would allow complex designs too. With this, solar cells could turn out to be part of beautiful architectural designs in future.<

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Green Building Taking Off in Hospitality, Retail Industries

Green Building Taking Off in Hospitality, Retail Industries | Green Building Design - Architecture & Engineering | Scoop.it

Green building is taking off in the hospitality and retail industries, [...]  This year, retail owners that are building green for over half of their projects rose to 38%, up from just 18% in 2011. That's expected to rise to 52% by 2015. 

Duane Tilden's insight:

>"Green building has taken such hold in the industry that even sectors with unique challenges, such as retail and hospitality, are making stronger investments," says Harvey Bernstein, vice president at McGraw Hill Construction. "Clearly the benefits that owners are reporting are key reasons for their green building investments, and as they find better ways to measure those impacts and quantify the value to their sales velocity and to the well-being of their staff, customers and guests, we expect even more rapid engagement in green."

 

While lower operating costs are the most frequently reported reason for going green (66% of retailers, 73% of hotels), other factors are also considered very important in their decision-making process:

Utility rebatesProtecting/enhancing brand - just as important as costs for hotelsImproving ROI[...]Energy efficiency is still a key goal, recycling and waste management are also critically important. A strong majority say they require green practices from suppliers, especially on waste handling (75%). <
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Go geothermal to maximize energy efficiency

A huge leap in energy conservation, and undoubtedly the most innovative of all energy saving tactics has its origins in the earth itself
Duane Tilden's insight:

>This geothermal system provides a quiet environment with a consistent temperature throughout the house or building; efficiently comfortable in the winter, and cool in the summer. The heating or cooling mode can be changed with a simple switch on the indoor thermostat. With virtually no use of fossil fuel, costs for heating and cooling for a typical 4,000-square-foot home can run as low as $2 per day/$60 per month.<

 

 

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Jessica Boriani's curator insight, June 18, 2013 3:29 AM

In the project Casa Zero Energy, in Italy- Udine, we have applied the system indicated in this article. Infact, the residential building was officialy presented in 2010, and is lived since. 

we use geothermal system to heat and cool the house, and photo-voltaic panels integretated with solar ones for electricity.

since 2010 we monitor the house in order to better understand the behavior of the building whilst lived in by a family of four persons.

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WPL Publishing Schedules LEED Green Associate Exam Preparation Webinar Series

(PRWEB) May 18, 2013 WPL Publishing soon will kick off a four-part webinar series to help people prepare for the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Green Associate (LEED GA) exam.
Duane Tilden's insight:

The series, which will begin June 4 and end June 25, is intended to bridge the gaps between other exam preparation resources, such as the U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC) “Green Building & LEED Core Concepts Guide” and “LEED Green Associate Study Guide.” To register for the four-part series, entitled “LEED Green Associate Exam Preparation,” visit http://tinyurl.com/crfdy5m.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1254975#ixzz2TgoQsny8

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