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An Administrator's Toolbox for Gifted Education

An Administrator's Toolbox for Gifted Education | Great Books | Scoop.it
Tamara Fisher is a K-12 gifted education specialist for a school district located on an Indian reservation in northwestern Montana and past president of the Montana Association of Gifted and Talented Education.
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Shimer College - ACTC Student Conference

We're hosting this student conference for the first time, and it's the largest ACTC has ever convened. The theme of the conference is “The Liberal Arts and Student Reflections on Core Texts.”

Forty-eight student were nominated by ACTC member institutions (with a core curricular program similar to ours) to submit paper proposals; forty proposals were accepted, and, as of today, we expect 37 students to attend. Students will be coming from more than twenty-five colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. Two Shimer students will also be presenting papers at the conference. This promises to be an exciting weekend!


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How will reading instruction change when aligned to the Common Core?

How will reading instruction change when aligned to the Common Core? | Great Books | Scoop.it

It is exactly this “close reading” that Common Core supporters hope will usher in a new era of reading instruction—one where teachers select grade-appropriate texts for all students; where they have students read and reread those texts—perhaps more times than even makes sense or feels comfortable—to support deep comprehension and analysis; and where they push students to engage in the text itself—in the author’s words, not in how those words make us feel.


Via Mel Riddile
Mark Gillingham's insight:

Great Books Shared Inquiry shines at close reading. 

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Linda Dougherty's curator insight, January 29, 2013 8:54 AM

Interesting thought-provoking article on reading instruction and the Common Core.

 

David A Wilson's curator insight, August 13, 2013 7:18 PM

Good article

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Great Books, Black College Style

Great Books, Black College Style | Great Books | Scoop.it

Many colleges and universities across the nation have Great Books curricula, but unfortunately, all too often, these curricula are not inclusive and merely showcase Western thinkers and mainly men.


Via Samuel Henderson
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Books are the chief escape for boys and girls from all reaches of the world. 

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High Expectations and the Common Core

High Expectations and the Common Core | Great Books | Scoop.it

Getting “Real” about the Common Core and High Expectations « Co-Creating Solutions: A Blog by CTL


Via Mel Riddile
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The Common Core State Standards demonstrates what high expectations look like. 

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What English classes should look like in Common Core era #ccss #ccchat #edchat #engchat

What English classes should look like in Common Core era #ccss #ccchat #edchat #engchat | Great Books | Scoop.it
What English classes should look like in Common Core era Washington Post (blog) lit The recent controversy over how much fiction and non-fiction high school students are supposed to read under the Common Core State Standards begged the question of...

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Shimer College Alumni Speak: Eric Nicholson on Great Books education


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Samuel Henderson's curator insight, December 30, 2012 1:21 AM

"Great Books, in the hands and eyes of an active reader, are Self Organizing Learning micro-Environments. The greatness of the books is a function of the capacity of their ideas and and arguments to accommodate the self organized expansion of the reader's understanding."

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Six Insights About the Common Core | ASCD Inservice

Six Insights About the Common Core | ASCD Inservice | Great Books | Scoop.it
Mark Gillingham's insight:

Many get bogged down in the minutia of the CCSS, but these 6 insights help one get the bigger view.

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The WHY of the Common Core State Standards | video

Council of Great City Schools
via CommonCoreWorks.org

This three-minute video explains how the Common Core State Standards will help students achieve at high levels and help them learn what they need to know to graduate college- and career-ready.


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Siri, Take This Down: Will Voice Control Shape Our Writing? | The Atlantic

Siri, Take This Down: Will Voice Control Shape Our Writing? | The Atlantic | Great Books | Scoop.it

A thoughtful rumination on how voice to text dictation may shape both written and oral communication. - JL

 

By Robert Rosenberger

 

"In the case of voice-to-text technologies, however, all writing becomes a kind of rehearsal for verbal interaction. In this light, an important effect of computerized dictation technologies is that they could lead people to become more skillful speakers, and thus more thoughtful participants in meaningful discussions. If writers of the future are composing text almost exclusively through computerized dictation, then they may become more thoughtful and nuanced speakers in the process. That is, the effect of dictation technologies may not be just on our writing, but that they may train us to be better verbal communicators, not just with our machines but with our fellow humans too."


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Mobile That Works. Students need to do to learn-- THE Journal

Mobile That Works. Students need to do to learn-- THE Journal | Great Books | Scoop.it
Successful mobile learning initiatives require cultural change and a student-centric approach.
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Focusing on Job Skills Limits Students’ Prospects - Letters - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Focusing on Job Skills Limits Students’ Prospects - Letters - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Great Books | Scoop.it

The institution where I teach is a case in point of this “paradox of practicality.” Shimer College is a small liberal-arts college focused on small, discussion-based classes where students work their way through important primary texts in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. The core curriculum introduces them to the major concepts, figures, and problems in each discipline. During their time here, students are expected to do significant writing within each field of study, ranging from a literary analysis to a research paper in the social sciences to a detailed account of a scientific experiment of their own design.


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Rescooped by Mark Gillingham from Common Core State Standards SMUSD
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Meeting the Common Core – Argumentative Writing in Grade 7

Reading and writing are two sides of a coin. Read, read, read. Write, write, write. 


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Tree Sitting – A Rebuttal to Clay Shirky

Tree Sitting – A Rebuttal to Clay Shirky | Great Books | Scoop.it

Clay Shirky observed at the Awl last week that he and I disagree over whether the trend toward MOOCs in higher education is reversible—he says no, and he says that I say yes—and I suppose he’s right, so far as that goes. But I don’t think that goes very far.There were a few cheap shots about “teamsters in tweed” that were worth noting. A lazy trope that depends on the belief that unions are essentially illegitimate, selfish, and retrograde, it’s a sly dig that lets him insinuate without directly asserting that anti-MOOC academics are self-interested and conservative luddites, that we are somehow positioning our own self-interest in opposition to the deep public spirit of Silicon Valley. It also passes along the insinuation that academics are powerfully unionized, which is far from the truth; as Jonathan Rees points out, would that we were more like teamsters.


But I’d just like to note the cheapness of that critique before moving on: as if self-interest is some unique academic perversion, as if Shirky himself lacks bread and a knowledge of which side it is buttered on, and—most importantly—as if the drive to make money off of students isn’t the only reason Silicon Valley is getting on the MOOC bandwagon. Because, of course, this was my original critique of Shirky’s language of “we educators”: he rhetorically inhabits that position in order to pooh-pooh its legitimacy as an opinion. He signs up for team education in order to run up the white flag on our behalf. Thanks, but, please, no thanks.


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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An idea worth debating. 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 12, 2013 6:26 PM

I was unfamiliar with the term Borg Complex before this. I have read Clay Shirky's work and I like the counterbalance that this article presents. I don't think MOOC's are reversable, but they can provided in a more responsible, mindful manner that leads to high quality learning.

Lance W. 's curator insight, February 12, 2013 10:56 PM

Very good read. 

Keith Wayne Brown's comment, February 12, 2013 11:34 PM
A really daoist response in some ways. The notion that the "useless" tree is quite useful in the overall and the long term, serving a purpose in the rhizomatic interconnection of cycles.
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Great Books and Business

Great Books and Business | Great Books | Scoop.it

Occupational training is not Gutenberg’s ultimate goal. Our ultimate goal is for our students to seek and embrace truth. But there are fringe benefits to that goal. Those fringe benefits — especially today — make great books students especially attractive to employers.

 

 


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Capturing the Visible Evidence of Invisible Learning | Academic Commons

Capturing the Visible Evidence of Invisible Learning | Academic Commons | Great Books | Scoop.it

From the website

 

A Picture of New Learning: Cross-Cutting Findings


"Collectively, what emerged from this work was an expansive picture of learning. Although we started out with questions about technology, early on it became clear that the questions were no longer merely about the “impact of tools” on learning; the emergent findings compelled us to confront the very nature of what we recognized as learning, which in turn fed back into what we were looking for in our teaching. Over the years, faculty experienced iterative cycles of innovation in their teaching practice, of reflection on an increasingly expansive range of student learning, and of experimentation shaped by the deepening complexity (and at times befuddlement) that emerged from trying to read the evidence of that learning. From this spiral of activity developed a research framework with broad implications for the now-emergent Web 2.0 technologies. We have come to articulate this range of cross-cutting findings under the headings of three types of learning: adaptive, embodied, and socially situated.

"Briefly, by adaptive learning we mean the skills and dispositions that students acquire which enable them to be flexible and innovative with their knowledge, what David Perkins calls a “flexible performance capability.”7 An emphasis on adaptive capacities in student learning emerged naturally from our foundational focus on visible intermediate processes. What became visiblewere the intermediate intellectual moves that students make in trying to work with difficult cultural materials or ideas, illuminating how novice learners progress toward expertise or expert-like thinking in these contexts.

 

"Our recognition of the embodied nature of learning emerged from this increased attention to intermediate processes--the varied forms of invention, judgment, reflection--when we realized that we were no longer accounting for simply cognitive activities. Many manifestations of the affective dimension of learning opened up in this intermediate space informed by new media, whether it was the way that students drew on their personal experience in social dialogue spaces, or the sensual and emotional dimensions of working with multimedia representations of history and culture. In these intermediate spaces, dimensions of affect such as motivation and confidence loomed large as well. We have come to think of this expansive range of learning as embodied, in that it pointed us to the ways that knowledge is experienced through the body as well as the mind, and how intellectual and cognitive thinking are embodied by whole learners and scholars.

 

"nasmuch as this new learning is embodied, similarly is it socially situated. Influenced by the range of work on situated learning, communities of practice, and participatory learning, our work with new technologies continuously brought us to see the impact new forms of engagement through media had on the students’ relative stance to learning. This effect was not merely a sense of heightened interest due to the novelty of new forms of social learning. Rather, what we were seeing was evidence of the ways that multimedia authoring, for example, constructed for students a salient sense of audience and public accountability for their work; this, in turn, had an impact on nearly every aspect of the authoring process--visible in the smallest and largest compositional decisions. The socially situated nature of learning became a summative value, capturing what Seely Brown calls “learning to be,” beyond mere knowledge acquisition to a way of thinking, acting, and a sense of identity.


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Kent Wallén, Jim Lerman
Mark Gillingham's insight:

When using social media, new technology, or collaborative discussion students show you their engagement and motivation. 

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, January 18, 2013 3:11 PM

Quite expansive and informative documentation of a group of largely humanities scholars at numerous campuses who have worked hard to integrate digital media into their scholarship and teaching.

Ignacio Jaramillo's curator insight, January 22, 2013 8:54 AM

The Difference that Inquiry Makes:
A Collaborative Case Study of Technology and Learning, from the Visible Knowledge Project.
Edited By Randy Bass & Bret Eynon

 

http://www.academiccommons.org/files/BassEynonCapturing.pdf

 

The essay complements eighteen case studies on teaching, learning, and new media technologies. Together the essay and studies constitute the digital volume "The Difference that Inquiry Makes: A Collaborative Case Study of Learning and Technology, from the Visible Knowledge Project." For more information about VKP, see https://digitalcommons.georgetown.edu/blogs/vkp/

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Can Common Core Bring Instruction Back?

Can Common Core Bring Instruction Back? | Great Books | Scoop.it

In this age of accountability, assessment has become a popular buzz word. DIBELS, DRA, BLT, WPM…the alphabet soup of how we assess if students can read or not is expanding at a rapid pace. The voracious appetite of this assessment monster is seriously threatening instruction. Teachers are so worried about assessment that they don’t focus on instruction, they just assess. Assessment has edged out good old fashioned instructional practices. It is evident across all grade levels. Elementary Sight Word Instruction Let’s think about sight word instruction. Teachers are notorious for calling students over, holding up flash cards, checklist in hand, carefully holding up cards, then telling them which words they have to practice more. Teachers ask students to read the sight words from PowerPoints, school walls, long lists, and carefully mark what they should study later. IS this instruction? Sounds to me, a lot like an assessment. Is this checking for understanding? Checking for understanding should come after instruction. It should not be the instruction. What is the actual instruction? Students need to read books, have books read to them, have models of what to do when you read. They need to touch books-a lot-to get sight words. Sight word tests are an assessment of what they have learned from instruction and exposure to text, not the other way around.


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Common core, whole child, teacher leadership, and action research: A perfect storm?

Common core, whole child, teacher leadership, and action research: A perfect storm? | Great Books | Scoop.it

The Common Core State Standards are more than an upgrade to what's already being done, they're a different approach and a new opportunity to support the whole child, writes educator Craig Mertler.


Via Darren Burris
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How does CCSS help you grow as a teacher? Craig Mertler has suggestions. 

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Think Alouds: Unpacking the Standards

Think Alouds: Unpacking the Standards | Great Books | Scoop.it

If you are having trouble understanding the Common Core Standards, and how to begin teaching with it, check this presentation out.


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How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today

How Technology is Changing the Way Children Think and Focus | Psychology Today | Great Books | Scoop.it

 

 By Jim Taylor, Ph. D.

 

"There is...a growing body of research that technology can be both beneficial and harmful to different ways in which children think. Moreover, this influence isn’t just affecting children on the surface of their thinking. Rather, because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops. For example, as the technology writer Nicholas Carr has observed, the emergence of reading encouraged our brains to be focused and imaginative. In contrast, the rise of the Internet is strengthening our ability to scan information rapidly and efficiently.

 

"The effects of technology on children are complicated, with both benefits and costs. Whether technology helps or hurts in the development of your children’s thinking depends on what specific technology is used and how and what frequency it is used. At least early in their lives, the power to dictate your children’s relationship with technology and, as a result, its influence on them, from synaptic activity to conscious thought.

 

"Over the next several weeks, I’m going to focus on the areas in which the latest thinking and research has shown technology to have the greatest influence on how children think: attention, information overload, decision making, and memory/learning. Importantly, all of these areas are ones in which you can have a counteracting influence on how technology affects your children."


Via Deborah McNelis, M.Ed, Terry Doherty, Meryl Jaffe, PhD, Jim Lerman
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WEAC's curator insight, August 7, 2015 9:55 AM

"Because their brains are still developing and malleable, frequent exposure by so-called digital natives to technology is actually wiring the brain in ways very different than in previous generations. What is clear is that, as with advances throughout history, the technology that is available determines how our brains develops."

Larry Heuser's curator insight, August 8, 2015 3:27 PM

Using the Internet is like jet skiing.  Skimming along the surface of the water at high speed, exposed to a broad vista, surrounded by many distractions, and only able to focus fleetingly on any one thing.

Audrey's curator insight, August 13, 2015 5:56 PM

This is true.  They seem to be absorbing ideas faster.

 

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In Chicago, Public Schools and Teachers Work Towards a 'Common Core' | PBS NewsHour | Dec. 3, 2012

In Chicago, Public Schools and Teachers Work Towards a 'Common Core' | PBS NewsHour | Dec. 3, 2012 | Great Books | Scoop.it
Some states, including Illinois, have recently adopted new public school curriculum guidelines called the Common Core State Standards.
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New National Survey Finds That > 1/3 MS Students Use Mobile Devices for Homework

New National Survey Finds That > 1/3 MS Students Use Mobile Devices for Homework | Great Books | Scoop.it

New National Survey Finds That More Than a Third of Middle School Students Use Mobile Devices for Homework; Yet Mobile-Device Use Is Still Not Common In Classrooms


MIT's Center for Mobile Learning at the Media Lab and Verizon Foundation Join Forces to Strengthen Student Engagement in STEM Through the Use of Mobile Technology

 

66% of students not allowed to use tables and 88% not allowed to use smartphones.

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Three Steps to Critical Thinking: Plus, Minus, Interesting

Three Steps to Critical Thinking: Plus, Minus, Interesting | Great Books | Scoop.it
Edward Charles Francis Publius de Bono is a bona fide genius. The author, inventor, Rhodes scholar and Nobel prize-nominated economist graduated from college at age 15.
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The Incredible Picture Books of Roland Harvey

The Incredible Picture Books of Roland Harvey | Great Books | Scoop.it

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