HSIE Stage 3- Great Barrier Reef Case Study (Environments)
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HSIE Stage 3- Great Barrier Reef Case Study (Environments)
This scoop.it aims to gather appropriate resources to use in a stage 3 classroom, about the Great Barrier Reef, a natural world heritage site. The outcomes addressed through the resources and activities include, ENS3.5 and ENS3.6, addressing the environment section of the HSIE syllabus. It aims to provide relevant resources from an Aboriginal Australian perspective and a global perspective, addressing the topic from all dimensions so as to provide students with an holistic view. This scoop.it aims to provide a critique and teaching idea for all resources, while evaluating its effectiveness for primary teachers to utilise in the classroom, making lessons more meaningful.
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Sea Turtle Information from World Turtle Trust

Sea Turtle Information from World Turtle Trust | HSIE Stage 3- Great Barrier Reef Case Study (Environments) | Scoop.it
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Caitlin van der Walt's comment, April 22, 2013 7:12 AM
This site explores the different species of sea turtles that live in reefs around the world. It allows the students to explore the need of conservation through a global perspective. The site expresses its concern for the varying species of sea turtles around the world and why it is important to conserve these reefs around the world. Using this website students are able to explore the need for conservation through the case study of sea turtles around the world, expanding their global awareness. Information about different turtle species is given including their location, diet, habitat and reproduction.

As an activity students choose a turtle species and write a factual report on the species. In their reports they should include the reasons why global conservation of reefs is essential for the species and how, as a globe, we can conserve our reefs. During the activity, students should be engaging in all levels of thinking to grasp a holistic view of the issue, thus relating to Anderson’s Taxonomy. This allows students to analyze, apply, understand and evaluate the information as they interpret it. Together with this, students then use their creativity to display the information in a new, accessible way (Forehand, 2005). Although this activity allows mainly for literacy links through writing and interpreting information, numeracy links can also be made through geography. Students can be expected to find a map locating the habitat of the turtle species and the distribution of the species, addressing the geographical aspect of HSIE. Together with this, students can graph the population of their turtle species over the period of 20 years. This encourages the students to display and communicate their information through mathematical concepts, such as statistics and graphing, creating a visual to compliment the written within their factual report (Bobis et al., 2009). Further interpretations of the information graphed can be made to provide an insight into the meaning behind the graph, i.e. how has it changed and what may have caused these changes (trends).

As an assessment strategy students are assessed on the effectiveness of the way their information is conveyed together with their ability to make the information accessible to all readers. This can be achieved by getting students to swap papers with a peer and for that peer to summarize the paper back to the writer of that paper, once its been read. From here teachers are able to assess the students’ ability to write a factual piece of writing and interpret graphs. Together with this, teachers are able to determine the students’ reading and ability to interpret new information and express the information in their own words.

Bobis, J., Mulligan, J., & Lowrie, T. (2009). Mathematics for Children: Challenging children to think mathematically (3rd ed.). Sydney, Australia: Pearson Education Australia.

Forehand, M. (2005). Bloom's taxonomy: Original and revised. In M. Orey
(Ed.), Emerging perspectives on learning, teaching, and technology. Retrieved 20 April 2013 from: http://projects.coe.uga.edu/epltt/
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The Great Barrier Reef - a world heritage listed, natural inspiration

The Great Barrier Reef - a world heritage listed, natural inspiration | HSIE Stage 3- Great Barrier Reef Case Study (Environments) | Scoop.it
Australia's most remarkable natural gift, the Great Barrier Reef is blessed with the breathtaking beauty of the world's largest coral reef, impressive coral cays, literally hundreds of picturesque tropical islands and some of the worlds most...
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Caitlin van der Walt's comment, April 22, 2013 6:48 AM
This is a site that provides people who are planning a visit to the Great Barrier Reef with all the necessary information, including accommodation and available activities. This resource will be beneficial for teachers looking for information to integrate a numeracy task into the HSIE unit of work, as from here teachers can develop an interactive notebook for students to work through during the lesson.

Following on from the above idea, an activity, which incorporates numeracy, specifically through financial literacy, is one that asks students to organize a holiday for them in the Great Barrier Reef, within a specific budget. The task draws on the students’ numeric knowledge together with their ability to problem solve and determine ways to ensure they stay within their budget. Furthermore, this task allows students to explore the Great Barrier Reef as a tourist or visitor by determining what activities and accommodation are available. Thus, the students are engaging in the Great Barrier Reef from a different perspective. Overall, if aiming for a differentiated classroom where the needs of individuals are met through modifying the activities (Marsh, 2010), this activity is one that should be considered.

This differentiation is achieved through modifying the content to suit the level and needs of the student, providing them with the same content, but changing the instruction and assessment strategies. For example, a modification for an extension would be to provide the students with a larger budget and require them to book a holiday for more than one person and take daily meals into consideration as well as accommodation, flights and activities. The same content has been used, however numbers and instruction has changed as to challenge the students. For this task, the assessment should be diagnostic, done through observations and feedback of the task at hand, thus allowing teachers to determine the growth and understanding of the student (Tomlinson, 1999). Using this resource, teachers are able to utilize the information and create an interactive activity for the students to do and to engage with the HSIE topic at hand, based on the learning needs and diversity within the classroom.

Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming a Teacher: knowledge, skills and issues (5th ed.). Sydney , Australia : Pearson Australia .

Tomlinson, C. (1999). The Differentiated Classroom: Responding to the needs of all learners . Alexandria, USA: ASCD.
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Threats to the Great Barrier Reef

Threats to the Great Barrier Reef | HSIE Stage 3- Great Barrier Reef Case Study (Environments) | Scoop.it
Climate change is the greatest of many threats to the Great Barrier Reef, pollution and overfishing among them.
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Caitlin van der Walt's comment, April 22, 2013 5:56 AM
This webpage addresses the threats that the Great Barrier Reef is under. It is sourced from a reputable organization, The World Wildlife Fund, so teachers can be ensured that they are getting reliable information. This page provides students and teachers with some facts and a brief summary of how these issues are opposing threats to the Great Barrier Reef and allows for further research to be conducted. Through the basic descriptions the site provides, students can research the cause of these issues and the contribution humans have played in the issues.

As a class, students use the issues outlined on the webpage to brainstorm and discuss why they are issues and the potential dangers to the Great Barrier Reef. This allows the students to think critically about the issues before furthering their research on the topics. Students then split into groups of 4 and each group is given a specific topic to research and become ‘experts’ in. Through this group work, students are encouraged to work cooperatively, with each student having individual goals (tasks) together with the final whole group goal, ensuring that all students are benefitting form the task (Marsh, 2010). Together with this, through the interaction and cooperation, high levels of achievement should be achieved as through enhancing their reading and writing skills (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). Once further research has been conducted, students write a news report transcript, linking literacy through focusing on the features of the text type together with the choice of language used, taking into consideration the audience being addressed. Students then get the chance to video record their news broadcasts to play back to the class.

Students are then assessed on their interpretation of the information through their news broadcasts and the underlying transcript. Students must consider the audience group being addressed and the importance of the issue being spoken about, students are given a criteria of areas which need to be addressed in the news report and are assessed on their ability to consolidate all areas into the one news report in the most creative way possible. Students use technology to record and playback their news reports to the class.

Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming a Teacher: knowledge, skills and issues (5th ed.). Sydney , Australia : Pearson Australia.

Gilbert, R & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning Australia.
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Exploring Oceans: Great Barrier Reef

The largest living structure, the Great Barrier Reef spans more than 1,200 miles (2,000 km) of islands and submerged reefs.
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Caitlin van der Walt's comment, April 22, 2013 6:52 AM
This shot clip, describes the nature of the Great Barrier Reef and the species, which make it their home. The descriptive language in the video should be noted for the purpose of the suggested task below. This video explores the reef and provides some facts about the reef along with the visuals. The resource would be beneficial as an introduction to the life of the Great Barrier Reef, and the biodiversity of habitats that exists. Its visual images allow students to explore and ‘see’ the Great Barrier Reef for themselves, making their own predictions and conclusions about the reef.

The video can be used to explore and discuss the varying habitats and species of the Great Barrier Reef. Form the video and further research, students write a piece of creative or factual writing that express their concerns for this species or habitat due to the impacts human’s are having on the reef. This task can be performed in groups of 3, where each individual in the group is given a specific task to complete, i.e. research about the species or habitat, research about the human impacts on the reef and research on how the reef is going to change in the future due to these impacts. The groups are given the freedom of conveying their message in any form under the guideline of criteria, stating the audience being addressed, the three aspects that need to be incorporated and its suitability for a newspaper. This task is heavily linked to literacy, as students are encouraged to confidently express themselves through their written pieces about relevant issues (Winch, 2010).

As a concluding activity, the class constructs a newspaper using their creative and factual pieces of writing about their concerns regarding the Great Barrier Reef. To make the task have more meaning, the class newspaper can be attached to the weekly newsletter. Through this activity, students are encouraged to be proactive citizens as they are standing against an issue by being actively involved in their community through “…meaningful and purposeful ways…” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 406). As an assessment, the teacher should provide continual feedback as draft copies are presented, to ensure the final copy highlights the students’ true ability. Together with this, assessment can be conducted through observation of the interaction of group members and their contribution within the group.

Gilbert, R & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning Australia.

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy : reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.
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Traditional Owners

Traditional Owners | HSIE Stage 3- Great Barrier Reef Case Study (Environments) | Scoop.it
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Caitlin van der Walt's comment, April 22, 2013 7:02 AM
This resource is an introduction into the role the Great Barrier Reef plays in the lives of some Indigenous Australians. This site addresses the connections that the Traditional Owners have to the Great Barrier Reef and explores these connections through various links to specific pages. For teachers it is important to note that this site was chosen using the Selection Criteria for the Evaluation of Aboriginal Studies and Torres Strait Islander Studies, addressing the areas of authenticity, accuracy, balanced nature of content and the participation of Indigenous Australians in the construction of the content.

This site allows students to explore the different uses people have for the Great Barrier Reef in particular, Indigenous Australians. Using this resource, teachers can direct a ‘thinking circle’ using de Bono’s Six Thinking Hats, as you explore the same context through different styles of thinking allowing the students to become “… a pile of different thinkers, all with the same head” (de Bono, 1999, p. 18). Thus, addressing all intellectual areas, focusing on viewing the content from various perspectives. Part of these thinking processes could include the construction of a historical timeline based on the interactions humans have had with the Great Barrier Reef over the years, and the changes that have occurred in the reef as a result. From here students can use the information on the site and incorporate the thinking skills to write a letter to the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Agency, creating a literacy link through interpreting information and writing a formal letter. This letter could be about why it is important for the traditional owners of the land to continue their traditions and cultural ways.

Students are then assessed through observations and by providing feedback (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011) on their writing skills, ensuring that the correct layout and wording is used for a letter format, together with the appropriate use of language to express their concerns. To make the task engaging, students can place their letters in an envelope and post it in a ‘post box’ to conclude the lesson; from here the teacher will mark the letters and provide feedback to the students.

De Bono, E., & Markland, J. (1999). Six Thinking Hats (Vol. 192). New York, USA: Back Bay Books.

Gilbert, R & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning Australia.