Gray Matters
Follow
Find
165 views | +0 today
Gray Matters
Literature, poetry, and anything curious, fascinating, or intriguing.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman from Cognitive Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

Our brains, and how they're not as simple as we think

Our brains, and how they're not as simple as we think | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
Neuroscience has entered the public consciousness, and changed the way we talk about ourselves. But much of what passes as knowledge is inaccurate, writes Vaughan Bell

Via Sandeep Gautam
more...
Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, March 4, 2013 3:22 AM

disagree on a few points; like whether poevrty has lasting effects on a dveeloping brain can be a good argumnet for prohibiting poverty (a good argument in my view) ; but a good article nonetheless.

Scooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman
Scoop.it!

Why Americans Are the Weirdest People in the World

Why Americans Are the Weirdest People in the World | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
Joe Henrich, Steven Heine and Ara Norenzayan are shaking up psychology and economics with their view of how culture shapes human thought and behavior.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman
Scoop.it!

Seeking seat of consciousness in...

Seeking seat of consciousness in... | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
Most of the brain's energy is used, not in 'thinking,' but in 'not thinking.' In part 3 of Inside Your Brain, CBC's Kelly Crowe learns that the idle brain might be the ultimate seat of human consciousness.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman
Scoop.it!

In the Mind's Eye, Dyslexic Renaissance: A Dyslexic Poet -- William Butler Yeats

In the Mind's Eye, Dyslexic Renaissance: A Dyslexic Poet -- William Butler Yeats | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman
Scoop.it!

Listening abilities depend on rhythms in the brain

Listening abilities depend on rhythms in the brain | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
When listening, this oscillation synchronizes to the sounds we are hearing. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences have found that this influences the way we listen.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

3-D printing enters the fourth dimension

3-D printing enters the fourth dimension | Gray Matters | Scoop.it

Saul Schleimer, a mathematician at the University of Warwick, and Henry Segerman, a mathematician at the University of Melbourne, are the co-creators of the Thirty Cell puzzle. They are both theoretical math researchers who also enjoy using 3-D printing—a technique for manufacturing a three-dimensional object from a computer program—to create mathematical art and visualizations. (In August, Scientific American featured some of Segerman’s sculptures in a slide show from the Bridges math-art conference.) This puzzle is a projection of a four-dimensional shape into our three-dimensional world. To explain how the projection was created, Schleimer brings it down a dimension and starts with a three-dimensional cube. Imagine a cube sitting inside a sphere. Now put yourself at the middle, holding a flashlight. The light projects all the edges and vertices out to the surface of the sphere. “We replace the usual cube that we know and love with a roundy cube on the sphere,” says Schleimer. This process is called radial projection.

 

Segerman and Schleimer use the company Shapeways to print their models. They use programs such as Python, Adobe Illustrator and Rhino to create files of an object that they send to Shapeways to translate into very precise 3-D models. Shapeways uses the computer files to program a laser to fuse powders into the shape of a 3-D object. It can even print objects with multiple interlinked components, such as the the fidget above. Another popular type of 3D printer, MakerBot, melts new layers of a material over previously deposited ones, so the models must be supported during the entire process. Shapeways doesn’t have that constraint, but its printers are more expensive. The company lets people upload their models and then ships the printed material out to them, rather than having users own printers themselves.

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman
Scoop.it!

The Power of Music: Mind Control by Rhythmic Sound | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

The Power of Music: Mind Control by Rhythmic Sound | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
New Orleans, October 16, 2012 - You walk into a bar and music is thumping. All heads are bobbing and feet tapping in synchrony. ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman
Scoop.it!

Emily Dickinson’s Poetry Set to Song by Israeli Singer-Songwriter Efrat Ben Zur

Emily Dickinson’s Poetry Set to Song by Israeli Singer-Songwriter Efrat Ben Zur | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
An enchanted celebration of music and literature.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Future Humans Will All Look Like Brazilians, Researcher Says

Future Humans Will All Look Like Brazilians, Researcher Says | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
In the future, globalization will destroy local races and lower rates of rare traits like blue eyes.

 

According to Stephen Stearns, a Yaleprofessor of ecology and evolutionary biology, before the invention of the bicycle, the average distance between the birthplaces of spouses in England was 1 mile (1.6 kilometers). During the latter half of the 19th century, bikes upped the distance men went courting to 30 miles (48 km), on average. Scholars have identified similar patterns in other European countries. Widespread use of bicycles stimulated the grading and paving of roads, lending credence to the Fugate clan's excuse and making way for the introduction of automobiles. Love's horizons have kept expanding ever since.

 

Stearns says globalization, immigration, cultural diffusion and the ease of modern travel will gradually homogenize the human population, averaging out more and more people's traits. Because recessive traits dependontwo copies of the same gene pairing up in order to get expressed, these traits will express themselves more rarely, and dominant traits will become the norm. In short, blue eyes and pale skin is out, brown eyes and dark skin is in. Already in the United States, another recessive trait, blue eyes, has grown far less common. A 2002 study by the epidemiologists Mark Grant and Diane Lauderdale found that only 1 in 6 non-Hispanic white Americans has blue eyes, down from more than half of the U.S. white population being blue-eyed just 100 years ago.

 

The genetic mixing under way in the United States is also happening to a greater or lesser degree in other parts of the world, the researchers said. In some places, unique physical traits tailored to the habitat still confer an evolutionary advantage and thus might not bow out so easily; in other places, immigration happens much more slowly than it does elsewhere. According to Stearns, perfect homogenization of the human race will probably never occur, but in general, Earth is becoming more and more of a melting pot. A population forged from the long-term mixing of Africans, Native Americans and Europeans serves as an archetype for the future of humanity, Stearns said: A few centuries from now, we're all going to look like Brazilians.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Leonardo Martins's comment, September 20, 2012 12:40 AM
Really?
Scooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman
Scoop.it!

5 Ways to Leave Your Body | Senses | DISCOVER Magazine

5 Ways to Leave Your Body | Senses | DISCOVER Magazine | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
Want to teleport through space or travel the world at will? Out-of-body technology can alter your sense of place and set you free. Visit Discover Magazine to read this article and other exclusive science and technology news stories.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman
Scoop.it!

Psychologists Discover How People Subconsciously Become Their Favorite Fictional Characters

Psychologists Discover How People Subconsciously Become Their Favorite Fictional Characters | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
Psychologists have discovered that while reading a book or story, people are prone to subconsciously adopt their behavior, thoughts, beliefs and internal responses to that of fictional characters as if they were their own.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman from Buffy Hamilton's Unquiet Commonplace "Book"
Scoop.it!

Sherman Alexie's Top Ten Native American Poets | BillMoyers.com

Sherman Alexie's Top Ten Native American Poets | BillMoyers.com | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
In this week’s show, author Sherman Alexie praises the artistic and storytelling ability of Native Americans, so we asked Alexie to share the names of so

Via Buffy J. Hamilton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman from Alternative Professional Development
Scoop.it!

650 Free Online Courses from Top Universities

650 Free Online Courses from Top Universities | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
Download 650 free courses from Stanford, Yale, MIT, Harvard, Berkeley and other great universities to your computer or mobile device.

Via Sue Beckingham
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman
Scoop.it!

What Neuroscience Really Teaches Us, and What It Doesn't

What Neuroscience Really Teaches Us, and What It Doesn't | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
The sort of short, simple explanations of complex brain functions that often make for good headlines rarely turn out to be true.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman
Scoop.it!

How The Internet Is Like A Child's Brain

How The Internet Is Like A Child's Brain | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
"Brain Power" explores the connection between the developing human brain of a child and the emerging global brain of the Internet and aims to help us think about the best ways to nurture and strengthen both.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman
Scoop.it!

Purge Your Vocabulary: Five Words That Should Disappear From Your Lexicon - TopTenREVIEWS

Purge Your Vocabulary: Five Words That Should Disappear From Your Lexicon - TopTenREVIEWS | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
Are you annoyed when you hear these words used incorrectly?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman
Scoop.it!

Halloween-colored lobster caught off Mass. coast | Odd Headlines | Comcast

Halloween-colored lobster caught off Mass. coast | Odd Headlines | Comcast | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
A Massachusetts fisherman has caught a creepy-looking lobster that's colored to match Halloween.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman
Scoop.it!

New Earth Physiology - Activating the Vagus Nerve ~ The Fractal Wanderer

New Earth Physiology - Activating the Vagus Nerve ~ The Fractal Wanderer | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman from Learning, Education, and Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

Japanese Dream Recording Machine

Japanese scientists have created the first step toward a device that, by scanning people's brains, could record people's dreams and read their mind. A scienc...

 

"A science lab in Kyoto, Japan has developed a system of using MRI scanners to resolve images directly from subject's brains.

"The current experiments show a subject an image and then reconstruct that image based on scans of the brain's visual cortex."


Via Pamela D Lloyd
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman
Scoop.it!

The best 100 closing lines from books

The best 100 closing lines from books | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
Don't judge a book by its cover - instead, try and wait for the last line.
Following our massively popular and lovingly selected list of the 100 best opening lines from books, it's now time for the closing lines to shine.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Maggie Kimpel Bokelman
Scoop.it!

The "Interpreter" in Your Head Spins Stories to Make Sense of the World | Mind & Brain | DISCOVER Magazine

The "Interpreter" in Your Head Spins Stories to Make Sense of the World | Mind & Brain | DISCOVER Magazine | Gray Matters | Scoop.it
Our left hemisphere tweaks the facts and allows us to feel like we’re in charge, experiments with split-brain patients reveal. . Visit Discover Magazine to read this article and other exclusive science and technology news stories.
more...
No comment yet.