grapevine and tree peony
10 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Da-Long Guo from Plant Breeding and Genomics News
Scoop.it!

ScienceDirect.com - Plant Science - Expression QTL mapping in grapevine—Revisiting the genetic determinism of grape skin colour

ScienceDirect.com - Plant Science - Expression QTL mapping in grapevine—Revisiting the genetic determinism of grape skin colour | grapevine and tree peony | Scoop.it

Abstract

Expression quantitative locus (eQTL) mapping was proposed as a valuable approach to dissect the genetic basis of transcript variation, one of the prime causes of natural phenotypic variation. Few eQTL studies have been performed on woody species due to the difficulty in sample homogenisation. Based on previous knowledge on berry colour formation, we performed eQTL mapping in field experimentation of grapevine with appropriate sampling criteria. The transcript level of VvUFGT, a key enzyme for anthocyanin synthesis was measured by real-time qRT-PCR in grape berry on a 191-individual pseudo-F1 progeny, derived from a cross between Syrah and Grenache cultivars. Two eQTLs were identified: one, explaining 20%, of genotypic variance and co-locating with VvUFGT itself (cis-eQTL), was principally due to the contrast between Grenache alleles; the other, explaining 35% of genotypic variance, was a trans-eQTL due to Syrah allelic contrast and co-located with VvMYBAs, transcription factors known to activate the expression of VvUFGT. This study assessed and validated the feasibility of eQTL mapping approach in grapevine and offered insights and new hypotheses on grape skin colour formation.

Highlights

► eQTL approach was applied on grapevine to study berry colour formation. ► Two eQTL were identified forVvUFGT transcript variation. ► One cis-eQTL co-locating with VvUFGT itself. ► A trans-eQTL, co-locating with VvMYBAs, the TF switching on VvUFGT. ► Additional insights and new hypotheses about grape berry colour were proposed.

  


Via Plant Breeding and Genomics News
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Da-Long Guo from Plant Breeding and Genomics News
Scoop.it!

Trends in Plant Science - Genetic bases of rice grain shape: so many genes, so little known

Rice (Oryza sativa) grain shape is a key determinant of grain yield and market values. Facilitated by advancements in genomics and various molecular markers, more than 400 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with rice grain traits have been identified. In this review, we examine the genetic bases of rice grain shape, focusing on the protein products of 13 genes that have been cloned and the chromosome locations of 15 QTLs that have been fine mapped. Although more genes affecting grain traits are likely to be cloned in the near future, characterizing their functions at the biochemical level and applying these molecular data to rice breeding programs will be a more challenging task.


Via Plant Breeding and Genomics News
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Da-Long Guo
Scoop.it!

Microsatellite Marker Development in Peony using Next Generation Sequencing

Microsatellite Marker Development in Peony using Next Generation Sequencing | grapevine and tree peony | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Da-Long Guo from Plant Breeding and Genomics News
Scoop.it!

Mapping & QTL Analysis - eXtension Learning Lessons

Mapping & QTL Analysis - eXtension Learning Lessons | grapevine and tree peony | Scoop.it

Take a look at Plant Breeding and Genomics updated curriculum page for mapping and QTL analysis.


Via Plant Breeding and Genomics News
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Da-Long Guo from Plant Breeding and Genomics News
Scoop.it!

Plant Methods | Abstract | Advances in plant gene-targeted and functional markers: a review

Public genomic databases have provided new directions for molecular marker development and initiated a shift in the types of PCR-based techniques commonly used in plant science. Alongside commonly used arbitrarily amplified DNA markers, other methods have been developed. Targeted fingerprinting marker techniques are based on the well-established practices of arbitrarily amplified DNA methods, but employ novel methodological innovations such as the incorporation of gene or promoter elements in the primers. These markers provide good reproducibility and increased resolution by the concurrent incidence of dominant and co-dominant bands. Despite their promising features, these semi-random markers suffer from possible problems of collision and non-homology analogous to those found with randomly generated fingerprints. Transposable elements, present in abundance in plant genomes, may also be used to generate fingerprints. These markers provide increased genomic coverage by utilizing specific targeted sites and produce bands that mostly seem to be homologous. The biggest drawback with most of these techniques is that prior genomic information about retrotransposons is needed for primer design, prohibiting universal applications. Another class of recently developed methods exploits length polymorphism present in arrays of multi-copy gene families such as cytochrome P450 and beta-tubulin genes to provide cross-species amplification and transferability. A specific class of marker makes use of common features of plant resistance genes to generate bands linked to a given phenotype, or to reveal genetic diversity. Conserved DNA-based strategies have limited genome coverage and may fail to reveal genetic diversity, while resistance genes may be under specific evolutionary selection. Markers may also be generated from functional and/or transcribed regions of the genome using different gene-targeting approaches coupled with the use of RNA information. Such techniques have the potential to generate phenotypically linked functional markers, especially when fingerprints are generated from the transcribed or expressed region of the genome. It is to be expected that these recently developed techniques will generate larger datasets, but their shortcomings should also be acknowledged and carefully investigated.


Via Plant Breeding and Genomics News
more...
No comment yet.