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Food History & New Markets
Food industry trends including: #foodmarketing, #foodhistory and #foodies. Senior editor/curator - Margaret Carroll Boardman Ph.D.
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Experts dismiss forecasts of soaring wine prices: worldwide production on the rise

Experts dismiss forecasts of soaring wine prices: worldwide production on the rise | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

1 November 2013, MercoPress -- "IIn a much-publicized report released Wednesday, US bank Morgan Stanley said that a worldwide fall in production and growing thirst for wine among Chinese and Americans would send prices rocketing. However industry experts say worldwide production actually rose this year. ...


The International Organization of Vine and Wine (OIV), which deals with technical and scientific aspects of winemaking, corroborated Genest's comments and pointed to a report published earlier this week.

In the OIV report, the organization says that “world wine production has increased significantly in 2013 and consumption is stabilizing.” ...'



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Broccoli’s Extreme Makeover

Broccoli’s Extreme Makeover | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

1 November 2013, New York Times, Michael Moss -- "Broccoli is about to get a serious makeover — and maybe, just maybe, be a model of how to persuade Americans to eat better.


The ad agency Victors & Spoils has created campaigns for some of the biggest brands in the food industry — Coca-Cola, Quiznos and General Mills among them. Until now, what they’d never done was try to figure out how to sell broccoli. Or any vegetables or fruits of any kind. This of course is not unique to Victors & Spoils. Major American advertising agencies tend not to get hired by produce growers to help them market fresh fruits and vegetables. They are hired by large companies making huge profits from processed foods to reach into whatever crannies of the American (or global) public they have not yet connected with. Victors & Spoils is exceedingly good at doing just that. The agency’s “Smile Back” campaign for Coca-Cola, which was released this summer, has been hailed as an ingenious use of a kind of guerrilla advertising ...

But there is some change in the air when it comes to marketing healthful food in America, and in anticipation of that, I posed a challenge to the firm: How would you get people to want to buy and eat broccoli? What would your campaign look like? What would the message be? What would you do that all the well-intentioned government-funded campaigns have failed to do for generations? ...

Photo: Creating the Broccoli Craze: What happens if an advertising agency markets fresh fruits and vegetables the way they do processed foods?

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The Broccoli Rebirth: Advertising Agency Victors & Spoils Takes On Challenge To Reposition Dull Vegetable

1 November 2013, PRNewswire for Victors & Spoils-- "The Broccoli Rebirth: Advertising Agency Victors & Spoils Takes On Challenge To Reposition Dull Vegetable Into Inspiring, Habit-Changing Brand.


A feature story published in The New York Times Magazine Nov. 3 issue covers a fictitious campaign, created by Boulder, Colo.–based advertising agency Victors & Spoils, which aimed to transform boring broccoli into the new hip "it" vegetable and demonstrate the power marketing can have on consumers' eating habits.

The article, "Broccoli's Image Makeover," written by Pulitzer Prize–winning investigative reporter and bestselling author Michael Moss, and a supporting video produced by senior video journalist Gabriel Johnson from The New York Times, exposes how a marketing campaign may be able to entice Americans to introduce healthier foods into their diets.

"As an advertising agency known for leveraging custom communities to reignite passion and cultural relevance for some of the world's most recognizable brands, we built a 130-person community of experts and creatives to treat broccoli as a brand that you will be inspired to connect with, as opposed to a vegetable you are being convinced to eat," said Andy Nathan, Victors & Spoils Chief Marketing Officer. "It was an exercise in finding the emotional truth behind broccoli, as opposed to repeating the rational benefits we've become immune to hearing."

The story documents the campaign's development with Bolthouse Farms, the nation's largest producer of carrots, serving as the client. The fictitious campaign examines the potential impact of creating a broccoli versus kale war, in the same vein as the famed cola wars of the 1980s that drove millions of dollars in sales for big soda brands.

"When digging into the assignment, we realized everyone was talking about kale, but there wasn't anything new to say about broccoli," said Chris Cima, Creative Director, Victors & Spoils. "Broccoli has been overlooked and left behind on the veggie tray, buried beneath cheese and hiding in Chinese food." ..."

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In Australia, Raw milk 'cow share' scheme leads to court fight

In Australia, Raw milk 'cow share' scheme leads to court fight | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

31 October 2013, ABC Rural (Australia) -- "Court considers if farmer who distributes raw milk through cow share scheme breached food regulations.


A court is being asked to determine whether a dairy farmer who distributes raw milk through a "cow share" scheme has breached food safety regulations in South Australia.


Mark Tyler's dairy at Willunga Hill was issued with a compliance order by Biosecurity SA in May.


Sale of raw milk is banned in South Australia but it is not illegal to drink milk from one's own cow.


Mr Tyler has sold shares in his cows and distributes milk to shareholders.


Authorities say the dairy farmer's actions are unlawful because he is not an accredited dairy producer and processor. ..."

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There's a global wine shortage

There's a global wine shortage | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

30 October 2013, Aaron Smith, CNN Money -- "Wine supply can't keep up with growing demand: Morgan Stanley.


There's just not enough wine in the world, says Morgan Stanley, and the problem is only going to get worse.


The industry is experiencing an "undersupply of nearly 300 million cases" a year, according to a report from Morgan Stanley Research.


Australia-based analysts Tom Kierath and Crystal Wang say the shortage comes despite the fact that there are one million wine producers globally, making 2.8 billion cases each year. About half of that comes from Europe.


But that's not enough to keep up with worldwide demand.

Global production fell by more than 5% last year - to its lowest level since the 1960s - primarily due to bad weather in France and Argentina.


Production in Europe alone dropped 10% in 2012, the report said. That same year, worldwide consumption rose by 1%.


... Morgan Stanley said that output from newer producers like the U.S., Argentina, Chile, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa has already peaked. ..."

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Could Count Chocula mount a comeback?

29 October 2013, Seeking Alpha -- "General Mills is selling all five of its iconic monster cereals this month with the original packaging look of the once-popular brands.


Monster brands Count Chocula, Franken Berry, Boo Berry, Fruit Brute, and Fruity Yummy Mummy aren't light on the sugar and contain a who's who of questionable preservatives.


The trial run is interesting because recent cereal trends show it's not just kids clamoring for sugary cereal amid overall tepid cereal demand. Execs with General Mills conveyed some sense of surprise recently that more than half of all Lucky Charms consumers are adults. ..."



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Indigenous Crop: Dried or Fresh, Wild Bush Tomato Is Delicious and Nutritious

Indigenous Crop: Dried or Fresh, Wild Bush Tomato Is Delicious and Nutritious | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

29 October 2013, Food Tank -- "The bush tomato has long been an important food source for Australia’s Indigenous people, rich in nutrients and taste.


Indigenous crops have provided communities with nourishment for thousands of years. Traditional and indigenous varieties of vegetables, fruits, legumes, and grains are not only typically highly nutritious, but also provide much-needed diversity in peoples’ diets, particularly in the developing world. Food Tank will regularly feature indigenous crops from around the world, highlighting the important roles they play in providing nutrients, improving food security, raising incomes, and making staple crops taste good. ..."


Photo: Sun-dried bush tomatoes can be preserved for long periods of time, and are a traditional food among Australian Aboriginals (Magnus Manske, 2010)

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South Africans Acquire Taste for Craft Beers

South Africans Acquire Taste for Craft Beers | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

29 October 2013, Voice of America, Peter Cox -- "South Africa's beer market has undergone some noticeable changes over the last few years. The country, dominated by commercial lagers, has started to develop a thirst for craft beer, and the number of microbreweries in the country has quadrupled in just four years. ..."


Photo: The tap at the Stanley Beer Yard in Johannesburg, South Africa. Lucy Corne, the author of African Brew, expects the number of craft breweries in the country to top 100 next year. (Peter Cox for VOA)

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Have a Coke and a … GMO?

Have a Coke and a … GMO? | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

28 October 2013, Politico -- "The Coca-Cola Company isn’t smiling about the latest effort to force labels on foods and beverages that contain genetically modified organisms – this time in Washington State.


It’s on a long list of manufacturers that sell products using ingredients derived from either corn or soy, both of which are nearly impossible to source in the United States without using genetically modified crops.

In fact, should Washington pass its ballot initiative 522 next week, good luck finding any processed foods or beverages in an Evergreen State grocery store that don’t have GMO warning labels.


Coca-Cola and PepsiCo both are on a list of 34 companies that now have contributed to a combined $11 million donation made by the Grocery Manufacturers Association to the campaign against I-522, which would require products in Washington to be labeled when they contain GMOs, GMA revealed earlier this month. Coke and Pepsi were identified as giving $1.52 million and $1.35 million respectively. ..."

Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2013/10/have-a-coke-and-a-gmo-98961.html#ixzz2jAgMds1n

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Biggest organic spenders

Biggest organic spenders | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it
28 October 2013, Food Navigator, Maggie Hennessy -- "Across the board, consumers are embracing natural and organic products more and more, with natural/organic retail sales reaching $81.3 billion in 2012, up 13.5% from the year before. ..."
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Goodbye Paper Menus? Restaurants Test The Water For Tablets

Goodbye Paper Menus? Restaurants Test The Water For Tablets | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

28 October 2013, NPR, Nevin Martell -- "Digital menus may help diners make more informed choices about restaurants' food and drink options.


When you sit down at Chef José Andrés' tapas restaurant, Jaleo, in Washington, D.C., and ask to see the beverage options, as I did recently, you're in for a surprise. Instead of a traditional leather-bound menu, I was handed an iPad.


An app called SmartCellar guided me to search for wine by grape variety and climate zone. ...But as I immersed myself in the app, I got so into it that the waiter had to stop by three times before I was ready to order.


"There's a clear advantage to digital menus," says Lucas Paya, wine director for José Andrés'ThinkFoodGroup, which has been testing them at two of the company's 16 restaurants since 2012. "First, there's the amount of content you can display, which is impossible on paper. And there's the real-time capability. I can update the list at a moment's notice online from anywhere in the world." ..."


Photo: A restaurant customer tries out the Aptito app on a digital menu. Credit: Aptito

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A Sweet And Sour History Of Our Obsession With Candy

A Sweet And Sour History Of Our Obsession With Candy | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

27 October 2013, NPR -- "A new book traces our love-hate relationship with sweets, once blamed for moral and physical decay.In Candy: A Century of Panic and Pleasure, Samira Kawash plots out the history of candy in America and our complex, ever-changing attitudes toward all things sweet. Kawash, a professor emerita at Rutgers University and the creator of the Candy Professor blog, tells NPR's Rachel Martin that candy, which only accounts for 6 percent of the added sugar in our diets, has gotten a bad rap. ..."

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A few cool crops for fall

A few cool crops for fall | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

25 October 2013, U-T San Diego -- "Autumn creeps slowly into California’s gardens, giving a much-needed respite to exhale and reflect. In mild-winter areas such as San Diego, an autumn veggie garden is started by planting cool-season vegetables that snuggle in the still warm-and-cozy soil.


Whether planted in a small container or a sizable plot, there are many cool-season crops to choose from. The following are several vegetables that are edible, ornamental and ideal for fall comfort dishes. Plus, their outer leaves or individual florets can be cut as needed, allowing the plants to continue to grow and to extend their harvesting time. ..."


Photo: Romanesco is an exotic-looking and tasty fall vegetable crop.

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Can Starbucks Do For Tea What It Has Done For Coffee?

Can Starbucks Do For Tea What It Has Done For Coffee? | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

1 November 2013, NPR, Margot Adler -- "The company recently bought the Teavana chain and has opened its first tea bar in New York City.


Starbucks, which revolutionized the coffee industry, is now taking on tea. It has opened its first tea bar, and it's creating mixed tea beverages, some even more complex and customized than the coffee beverages we all know.


This first store, on Madison Avenue in Manhattan, has minimalist decor: gray soft seats, charcoals, chestnut browns. Teavana teas line one wall. Beakers filled with colored liquids greet you at the entrance.


The cococaramel sea salt tea latte is delicious, but at 350 calories it's not an everyday drink. Cliff Burrows, regional group president of Starbucks and Teavana, says tea isn't new for Starbucks. "Our original logo from 1971 was coffee, tea and spice," he says. "But tea has always been secondary to the coffee business that we have grown around the world." ..."


Photo: A pot of tea sits at the newly opened Teavana tea bar in New York City.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

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“got milk?” at 20

31 October 2013, Brownfield Ag News for America -- "Got Milk? The iconic question is commemorating its 20th anniversary this year. It all started when the California Milk Processor Board asked for for promotional ideas in 1993. Jeff Goodby of Goodby, Silverstein & Partners says a lady in a focus group said, “The only time I ever think about milk is when I run out of it.” That’s when Goodby scrawled “got milk?” on a poster board…and the rest is history.


... it has moved beyond a tagline to being “a piece of culture.” ..."

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Candy Sales Are Flat; The Industry Blames The Weather

Candy Sales Are Flat; The Industry Blames The Weather | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

31 October 2013, NPR, Allison Aubrey -- "Is it the weather, or might consumers be heeding the messages to cut back on sugar?


Photo: Halloween candy is offered for sale at a Walgreens store on September 19, 2013 in Wheeling, Illinois.

Scott Olson/Getty Images

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Future Food Salons turn Westerners on to ‘ancient’ notion of insects as food

Future Food Salons turn Westerners on to ‘ancient’ notion of insects as food | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

31 October 2013, Food Navigator, Maggie Hennessy -- "Never mind that insects have protein levels comparable chicken or beef, are low in cholesterol, high in omega-3s and essential minerals like iron; or that they require a fraction of the land, water and emissions to produce compared to traditional... "

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Uncle Matt's Organic outpaces competition in organic juice 'war of attrition'

Uncle Matt's Organic outpaces competition in organic juice 'war of attrition' | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

30 October 2013, Food Navigator, Maggie Hennessy -- "From one pulp-free organic orange juice SKU in a regional Florida grocery store chain in 1999, Uncle Matt’s Organic is the oldest US organic juice company with 11 organic juice products and national distribution in such chains as Whole Foods, Publix and Kroger. ..."


Photo: Matt McLean, CEO, Uncle Matt's Organic.

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Jam debate: The end of the British breakfast?

Jam debate: The end of the British breakfast? | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

30 October 2013, The Telegraph -- "Liberal Democrat MP Tessa Munt says a debate over the amount of sugar in jam could herald "the end of the British breakfast as we know it"


Tessa Munt said the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) should not adopt new rules which will allow jam producers to call their fruit spreads jam even if they are only 50% sugar. ...She told MPs in a Westminster Hall debate that rules dating back to research in the 1920s meant that jam had to be at least 60% sugar to retain its gel-like quality.


Defra Minister George Eustice said "one impetus" for the change was an European Union "jam directive". He said it permitted, but did not require, a sugar level lower than 60% to be set. ..."

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UK Celebrity chefs ranked on seafood sustainability

29 October 2013, AlphaGalileo, University of York -- "

Celebrity chefs are encouraging more people to cook with sustainable seafood, but how far do they practise what they preach?


Researchers from the Environment Department at the University of York ranked the cook books published by ten celebrity chefs between 2005 and 2012 according to the sustainability of the seafood they feature.


Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall was the front runner throughout the time period, with his books achieving an average score of 87 per cent. In comparison, Delia Smith scored consistently low, between 17 and 22 per cent, and finished at the bottom of the table. Gordon Ramsay, who once encouraged people to eat an endangered fish called orange roughy, rose from bottom of the table in 2007 to third place by 2012. Raymond Blanc, is another chef whose score rose substantially -- from 22 per cent to 85 per cent between 2005 and 2011 -- reflecting a general improvement in the use of sustainable seafood in the cook books from most chefs in recent years. 


Polly Bowman, who carried out the research as part of her MSc degree in Marine Environmental Management said “Celebrity chefs are a major part of British media culture, and are able to amass formidable book sales. Sales of endorsed products often increase following the release of their books. A chef’s ethical leanings may therefore influence the behaviour of consumers.” ..."

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Centuries-Old Ohio Farms Are Inspiring In Their Dedication To Preserving History

Centuries-Old Ohio Farms Are Inspiring In Their Dedication To Preserving History | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

28 October 2013, Huffington Post -- "Family farms are much more than just a slice of the past.


Family farms are much more than just a slice of the past. They may also be one of the keys to a brighter, greener future -- and nothing proves their timelessness quite like Central Ohio's collection of bicentennial farms, which date back to the time of our Founding Fathers.


Of Ohio's 73,400 farms, 65 were recently certified certified as "bicentennial," meaning they've been owned by the same family for at least 200 years, according to the Columbus Dispatch. ..."


Video: Farm stays in family for 200 years - Brad Berry raises cattle on the family farm in Walnut Township, Ohio.

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Pressure situation! Hain Celestial faces $5m+ juice court claim on HPP

Pressure situation! Hain Celestial faces $5m+ juice court claim on HPP | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it
28 October 2013, Beverage Daily -- "Hain Celestial Group is facing a US lawsuit seeking millions in damages for alleged false claims its BluePrint fruit and vegetable juices are ‘unpasteurized’ and ‘100% raw’, due to use of high pressure processing (HPP). ..."
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OMG Blends Launches Deliciously Healthy Meal Replacements for Busy Women

28 October 2013, PRNewswire for OMG Blends -- "Overwhelmed by busy schedules, and a lack of easy, simple, healthy meal options, more than 31 million Americans are guilty of skipping at least one meal every day. OMG Blends is the healthy solution to a time crunched-nation on-the-go.


OMG Blends, Organic Made Great, innovative line of nutrient-rich delicious smoothies and soups contain high-quality, organic ingredients packed with fiber, healthy fats and superfoods like kale, raw cacao and goji berries with no preservatives. OMG Blends smoothies are filling because of their high fiber and protein content, making for a great meal replacement first thing in the morning, or for lunch and dinner. The soups are great for a snack to keep you satisfied throughout the day.

Founded by moms for moms, these perfectly-balanced blends are designed to replace one or two of your daily meals so that you will get the protein and nutrients you need without skipping a meal. ..."

OMG Blends is launching seven nutritious smoothie blends:


-       iheartomg (blueberry, pecan and cinnamon)
-       blenergy (kale and ginger)
-       blendphoria (raw cacao, hazelnut and coconut milk)
-       blendsense (peanut butter, cardamom and bananas)
-       blendgenius (goji berry and chai spice)
-       blendternal (matcha green tea, greens and coconut water) and blendpress (cold pressed coffee and raw cacao hazelnut)

OMG Blends is launching seven savory soups:
-       Tomato basil (seasonal)
-       Cauliflower turnip
-       Zucchini roasted fennel
-       Carrot ginger
-       Spinach pea mint
-       Kabocha, fuji apple, red pepper flakes 
-       Sweet potato ginger

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Rogue Ales 5.3% ABV: Chocolate, Peanut Butter and Banana!

28 October 2013, Beverage Daily, Ben Bouckley -- "Rogue Ales has launched a 5.3% ABV artisanal chocolate, banana and peanut butter flavored beer in collaboration with Oregan-based doughnut chain Voodoo Doughnut, after the brewer teamed up with the outlet to produce a bacon and maple-syrup variety. ..."

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Fish Sauce: An Ancient Roman Condiment Rises Again

Fish Sauce: An Ancient Roman Condiment Rises Again | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

26 October 2013, NPR, Deen Prichep -- "Fish sauce used to be integral to European cooking, until taxes and pirates caused it to disappear.


Fish sauce — that funky, flavor-enhancing fermented condiment — is part of what gives Southeast Asian cooking its distinctive taste. But it turns out, this cornerstone of Eastern cooking actually has a long history on another continent: Europe. And it goes all the way back to the Roman Empire.


Like Asian fish sauces, the Roman version was made by layering fish and salt until it ferments. There are versions made with whole fish, and some with just the blood and guts. Some food historians argue that "garum" referred to one version, and "liquamen" another, while others maintain different terms were popular in different times and places. The current convention is to use garum as a common term for all ancient fish sauces.


...And so, Italian fish sauce pretty much disappeared. But it remained in a few little pockets — like in Southwest Italy, where they produce colatura di alici, a modern descendant of the ancient fish sauce. The product was barely known even in Italy just a few years ago, but it is gradually being rediscovered. ..."


Photo: Ava Gene's, a Roman-inspired restaurant in Portland, Ore., incorporates colatura, a modern descendant of ancient Roman fish sauce, into several of its dishes.

Deena Prichep/NPR

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