Food History & New Markets
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Food History & New Markets
Food industry trends including: #foodmarketing, #foodhistory and #foodies. Senior editor/curator - Margaret Carroll Boardman Ph.D.
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'Badger-friendly' milk to be sold in just three UK supermarkets

'Badger-friendly' milk to be sold in just three UK supermarkets | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

5 June 2013, The Guardian -- "Waitrose, Marks & Spencer and Asda say they will not sell milk that has come from dairy farms inside cull zones. .."

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Why eat home canned/preserved foods?

30 May 2013, Julie Harker, Audio file -- "Why bother with home canning and food preservation?  Nutrition and health education specialist Vera Massey with the University of Missouri Extension says those foods are good for you if preserved properly. ..."

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Avocados from Mexico, Inc., Implements New Marketing Strategy to Move Avocados from Exotic to Everyday

28 May 2013, PRNewswire -- Avocados from Mexico, Inc. (AFM, Inc.), the newly formed marketing agency dedicated to the Mexican avocado industry, is allocating $36 million to grow the category and propel the Avocados from Mexico brand. To implement this strategy, Tim O'Connor, CEO, AFM, Inc., will appoint Arnold Worldwide as integrated agency of record, and Ketchum as PR agency of record. Launching nationally beginning in July 2013, the organization's first fully integrated campaign aims to move the avocado from exotic to everyday.

 

Earlier this year, AFM, Inc., announced the appointment of Tim O'Connor, the former president and CEO of the U.S. Potato Board, to lead the newly formed marketing agency. Creating AFM, Inc., is an important milestone for the Mexican avocado industry. The organization is the result of an unprecedented collaboration by the Mexican Hass Avocado Importers Association (MHAIA) and the Mexican Avocado Producers and Packers (APEAM A.C.) to combine resources and develop and manage a common brand for the Mexican avocado industry.

 

"The selection of the best agencies to represent our brand was an intense process," O'Connor noted. "After narrowing 52 proposals down to 11 presenting agencies, Arnold and Ketchum were the definitive winners. They clearly understood our vision for the brand and demonstrated the strategic focus and creativity we need."

 

"Winning Avocados from Mexico, Inc., is a unique and compelling opportunity that doesn't come along very often," commentedPam Hamlin , President, Arnold Boston . "Engaging the hearts and minds of people and inspiring them to use avocados everyday is an incredible creative challenge. We're thrilled to get started and channel our passion into fueling the growth of the avocado marketplace."

 

Rob Flaherty , CEO, Ketchum, said, "We're honored to continue our relationship with this rapidly growing, vibrant brand that has so much to offer health-conscious consumers and foodservice operators as a delicious addition to their meals."

 

As the only avocados available year round, Mexican avocados contribute more than 60 percent of the U.S. supply, and for the 2012/2013 fiscal year, Mexican avocados surpassed 1 billion pounds in annual shipments. The avocado industry has experienced steady growth over the past five years. From 2010 to 2011 alone, avocado sales grew 11 percent to $2.9 billion. Despite this impressive sales increase, there are still millions of consumers who don't buy avocados, creating a significant opportunity for AFM, Inc., and its new agencies to drive continued growth for the category and the Avocados from Mexico brand.

 

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How Cabernet Sauvignon under the sea tastes a bit different - Telegraph

How Cabernet Sauvignon under the sea tastes a bit different  - Telegraph | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

28 May 2013, The Telegraph -- A winery has recoverd four cases of Cabernet Sauvignon it sank in the Atlantic three months ago in an attempt to establish the effects of ocean ageing on wine.

 

In February the Mira Winery, based in California's Napa Valley, had divers take the wine 60ft down in cages off Charleston, South Carolina.

 

The company said it was the first in the United States to age its product by putting it in the ocean, and claims the results have been outstanding.

Charleston-based sommelier Patrick Emerson who tasted the wine, said: "In full disclosure, I am a big fan of the control wine which was on land. I am quite surprised, shocked, at how quickly these two wines have changed paths. Something magical has happened. The signature difference might be in the riddling motion of the tides."

 

Gustavo Gonzalez of Mira Winery said: "It's not better, its not worse and it is definitely different."

 

He said the ocean aged wine was "more complex and broad, more open and relaxed. The result is proof certain that we have more to learn."

Winemakers have long known that wine recovered from sunken ships has a unique taste, possibly due to differences in temperature and humidity, pressure, the movement of the water and light differences.

 

Mr Gonzalez said: "There are definite differences in temperature and pressure, motion and light that we don't see on land." Wine has been aged in the ocean before by wineries in Europe, but the US winemaker said it wanted to conduct a systematic analysis of the effects of the ocean.

The sunken wine is being chemically analysed and a further batch will be dropped into the water for six months.

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Campbell Soup Co to acquire organic babyfood maker Plum Organics

Campbell Soup Co to acquire organic babyfood maker Plum Organics | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

24 May 2013, Food Navigator USA, Elaine Watson, -- "Campbell Soup Co is to acquire organic babyfood maker Plum Organics for an undisclosed sum."

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Verdict in Wisconsin raw milk case

27 May 2013, Brownfield Ag News for America -- "Vernon Hershberger raw milk case in Wisconsin - theLoganville dairy farmer was found guilty of violating the state holding order and acquitted on three other charges for operating a dairy farm and dairy processing operation without licenses and operating an unlicensed retail store. ..."

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US-made gluten-free pasta is ‘good opportunity’, says Harvest Innovations

US-made gluten-free pasta is ‘good opportunity’, says Harvest Innovations | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

24 May 2013, Food Navigator USA, Stephen Daniells -- "A new partnership between Heartland Harvest (Illinois) and Harvest Innovations (Iowa) is set to deliver new gluten-free pasta to the food industry, tapping into a substantially growing sector."

GR2Food's insight:

Marketing includes plans to expand to the European market where gluten free products are considered medical foods.  The European consumer market place for gluten free is larger and the more knowledgeable about these types of products.

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McDonald’s Shareholders Vote on Marketing Unwholesome Food

McDonald’s Shareholders Vote on Marketing Unwholesome Food | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

23 May 2013, TriplePundit, Harry Stevens -- "A resolution at the McDonald's annual shareholder meeting today will seek to prevent the fast food giant from marketing unhealthy food to children."

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Nestlé Cocoa Plan to expand to US products

Nestlé Cocoa Plan to expand to US products | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

22 May 2013, Food Navigator USA, Jenni Spinner -- "Nestlé USA announced at the National Confectioners Association (NCA) show that the company is expanding its Nestlé Cocoa Plan responsible sourcing program to its American product offerings."

GR2Food's insight:

Sustainable sourcing will be done for Nestle Crunch bars sold in the USA. In cacao growing regions of the world, the sustainability plan includes setting up and funding "farmer schools," improving infrastructure, and working to distribute high-yielding cacao plants.

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In Australia, Exchange Program Lets Chefs Loose on Farms

In Australia, Exchange Program Lets Chefs Loose on Farms | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

22 May 2013, ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) -- Some young chefs get their hands dirty to learn more about the produce they use in their kitchen.

 

A pair of Italian chefs had no idea what went into growing the vegetables they cooked with until a recent stint working at an organic farm and orchard in South Australia.

 

Dominque Sill and Anna Rier spent three weeks working at an organic orchard and farm in the mid-north, getting an appreciation for the produce they prepared in their kitchen. ...

 

"For us as chefs it is very interesting to know where all the vegetables come from and what the work is to get this to the supermarket," he said.

"I think a few chefs don't even know where a capsicum grows and how it grows."

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New extension increases Singapore’s role in Nestlé empire

New extension increases Singapore’s role in Nestlé empire | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

23 May 2023, Beverage Daily -- "Nestlé has opened a new extension to its research and development centre in Singapore that it says will allow greater focus on the Asia-Pacific region—its fastest-growing market."

GR2Food's insight:

The purpose of this new R&D center is coffee mixes and powdered drinks.

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The Cupbearer Debuts Coffee and Tea Outfitter Concept in Coffeehouse Industry

22 May 2013, PRNewswire -- "The Cupbearer Debuts Coffee and Tea Outfitter Concept in Coffeehouse Industry. Flagship store blends a multi-source coffeehouse with gadgets and gourmet ingredients.

 

The Cupbearer sees itself as "the industry's first multi-source coffee and tea outfitter store. It will sell coffee from various award-winning micro-roasters and over 30 loose-leaf teas from multiple purveyors.

 

"Coffee and tea lovers want to find their perfect drink. But major chains only offer their own brands," said Anthony Miller, whose title is Chief Cupbearer.

 

"Artisan roasters are doing amazing things out there. We scout them and other suppliers for the best beans, teas, and gear our customers can experience."

One of the store's suppliers is Chicago-based Metropolis Coffee, a perennial winner of coffee awards nationally and regionally. The Cupbearer is the first location to carry and serve the roaster's beans in Georgia.

 

"The model makes sense," said Tony Dreyfuss, owner of Metropolis Coffee. "People want to taste a wider variety." ..."

 

 

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DANONE inks two Chinese dairy deals

20 May 2013, Brownfield Ag News for America -- "French yogurt giant DANONE has reached an agreement to invest 325 million euros ($417 million) in China’s Mengniu Dairy Company. Demand for foreign dairy products has skyrocketed in China since the 2008 melamine scandal caused a loss of confidence in domestic dairy products. Through the French deal, Mengniu will utilized new technology in production of what they promise will be much safe dairy products. The investment will give DANONE Group a four percent share of the largest milk company in China.

 

Under a second agreement, DANONE will set up and own 20 percent of a joint venture to make and sell chilled yogurt in China. Mengniu had 16 percent of the Chinese yogurt market in 2010; the new joint effort is expected to double that by 2015."

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Study Finds Eating the 'Noma diet' Cuts cholesterol

Study Finds Eating the 'Noma diet' Cuts cholesterol | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

30 May 2013, The Telegraph -- Eating a Scandinavian diet rich in game, berries and fish can lower cholesterol and may reduce the risk of heart disease, according to new research.

 

It has ranked as the best restaurant in the world for three years in a row, but it looks like the simple Scandinavian fare served at Noma may also be good for you.

 

Scientists have found that eating Nordic cuisine - such as berries, fish and game - can lower cholesterol and may help to reduce the risk of heart disease.

 

Already being named as the Noma Diet, eating Scandinavian food could now provide an alternative to Mediterranean food for those looking for a healthy option.

 

The Mediterranean diet, with high levels of olive oil, fish and sun-ripened vegetables, has long been considered to be the ideal eating plan as people who stick to it tend to have lower incidence of heart disease.

 

However, the new findings have been welcomed by nutrition experts as Nordic foods grow more readily in colder northern latitudes like the UK.

 

Scandinavian food has recently become popular in the UK while restaurants like Copenhagen based Noma, which uses locally sourced food in Denmark, has been named as the best in the world in 2010, 2011 and 2012.

Run by chef Rene Redzepi, Noma has made its name for serving simple Scandinavian dishes that include as asparagus, blueberries, fish roe and lingon berries.

 

However, in April this year Noma lost out to Spanish based El Celler de Can Roca, which took the top slot on the coveted World's 50 Best Restaurants list.

 

The new research by Professor Matti Uusitupa, from the institute of public health and clinical nutrition at the University of Eastern Finland, will now help to heighten the growing competition between the Mediterranean and Nordic culinary worlds.

 

 

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Investigation into Possible Breaches of Fiduciary Duty by Board of Smithfield Foods Inc.

30 May 2013, PRNewswire, NY -- Levi & Korsinsky is investigating the Board of Directors of Smithfield Foods Inc. for possible breaches of fiduciary duty and other violations of state law in connection with the sale of the Company to the Shuanghui International Holdings Ltd.

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Nestlé CRUNCH Bars to be Made from Certified Cocoa

Nestlé CRUNCH Bars to be Made from Certified Cocoa | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

28 May 2013, Triple Pundit -- "Nestlé announced last week that CRUNCH bars, the company’s 75-year-old flagship brand, will be made entirely from ethically-certified cocoa beans by year’s end. The beans will be certified by UTZ Certified, one of the world’s largest and most respected independent labeling organizations.

 

The announcement represents an acceleration of theNestlé Cocoa Plan, the company’s $120 million global initiative to improve the lives of cocoa farmers while also assuring a first-rate, sustainable cocoa supply for years to come.

"Recent surveys have shown that a growing number of consumers are seeking foods made with responsibly-sourced ingredients,” said Robert Kilmer, president of confections and snacks at Nestlé USA.

 

'Actions taken under the Nestlé Cocoa Plan help socially-aware consumers feel good about benefitting people and communities in other parts of the world,” he added.

 

Nestlé has taken a proactive approach to stemming the human rights abuses that have long plagued chocolate companies’ byzantine cocoa supply chains. Of the four million tons of cocoa produced annually, an estimated 73 percent comes from some 2 million farms spread across West Africa.

 

In Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire alone, cocoa-related agriculture employs more than 1.8 million children, according to a 2011 study funded by the U.S. Department of Labor. Most of the children employed in West African cocoa farming are not paid for their work.

 

“Children working in cocoa agriculture [in Ghana and Côte d'Ivoire] are frequently involved in hazardous child labor and there is evidence of individual cases of children exposed to… child trafficking, forced labor, etc.,” the report states."

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Production and Market of High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) in China

23 May 2013, PRNewsWire -- A new market research reports studies the growing market for high fructorse corn syrup in China.

 

"As the best substitute for sucrose, HFCS has seen a fast growth in China since 2009 due to the continuous price hike of sucrose and increasing demand. The number of new producers is increasing, and many producers have enlarged their capacity to chase the product's remarkable profit in the past five years. With the new projects of HFCS spinging up, competition in China's HFCS market is becoming increasingly intense. Who are the leading producers? What has happened in the domestic HFCS market? How is the current competition situation of glucose in China? What is the future relationship between supply and demand in the glucose market? In this report, you can find out the answer to the above questions.

Since HFCS is a deep processing product of corn, many producers and downstream consumers are worried about the government's policies that restrict corn deep processing industry, fearing this will push up their production cost. In this report we have introduced related policies, and analyze their influence on the HFCS industry. Besides, we have introduced the development of HFCS's raw material in the past few years."

Additionally, the latest consumption trend of HFCS in China is another focus in this report, and we also provide forecast on it in the coming few years.

GR2Food's insight:

"Snack and Sweet Industry: Production and Market of High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) in China" http://www.reportlinker.com/p0935788/Production-and-Market-of-High-Fructose-Corn-Syrup-HFCS-in-China.html#utm_source=prnewswire&utm_medium=pr&utm_campaign=Snack_and_Sweet

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Movement Against GMOs Seems to be Strengthening but Food Companies Struggle to Find Replacements

27 May 2013, Seeking Alpha -- "While the movement against genetically modified foods seems to be strengthening ( witness the weekend's global protests against Monsanto (MON)), food companies are struggling to replace GM ingredients with conventional ones.

 

With Whole Foods (WFM) saying that all products in its stores will have to be labelled if they contain GM elements, even traditional users of conventional ingredients such as WhiteWave Foods (WWAV) unit Silk have been caught up in the red tape."

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Michael Pollan: Why the family meal is crucial to civilisation

Michael Pollan: Why the family meal is crucial to civilisation | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

24 May 2013, The Guardian, Richard Johnson -- "Michael Pollan, the American food writer and campaigner, says eating together round the table every night is the way children learn best how to get along in the wider world.

 

What's for dinner? Where will you eat it? And who will eat it with you?Michael Pollan reckons that the answers to these questions could determine our survival as a species. In his own case, the answers are: meatballs, round the table, with his family.

 

An internationally successful food writer and campaigner, he's just got home after a tour to promote his new book, Cooked: A Natural History Of Transformation. Now he just wants to unpack and do some cooking. "I've found this terrific new recipe using ricotta," he says. "It's so light."

 

He won't be serving it on trays, in front of the television because sitting round a table is so important. "It's where we teach our children the manners they need to get along in society. We teach them how to share. To take turns. To argue without fighting and insulting other people. They learn the art of adult conversation. The family meal is the nursery of democracy."

 

 

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Awesome old cookbook shows that the 1904 raw food movement was really into meat and cream

Awesome old cookbook shows that the 1904 raw food movement was really into meat and cream | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

24 May 2013, Grist, Sarah Laskow -- "Eugene and Mollie Griswold Christian make a lot of the same arguments for healthy living and raw food that you hear today. Only they make them in turn-of-the-century style.

 

Americans have a long tradition of dreaming up radical ideas for uber-healthy diets and trying to convince other people that their lives and bodies will be transformed if they just change what they’re putting in their mouth. The country’s first raw food restaurant opened in Los Angeles in 1917 and stayed open for 25 years.  ..."

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Catterton Partners Enters Into An Agreement To Sell Plum Organics To Campbell Soup Company

23 May 2013, PRNewswire.com, Catterton Partners  -- Cattherton announced today that it has entered into an agreement to sell Plum Organics, a leading premium, organic kids nutrition company, to Campbell Soup Company ("Campbell").  Terms of the transaction were not disclosed.

 

Since partnering with Plum Organics in 2010, Catterton Partners has worked with the company's management team to aggressively grow the Plum brand into a leading organic kid's nutrition company.  With its complete line of organic products, unique food and flavor combinations, and innovative offerings and packaging, Plum has helped to revolutionize the baby food industry.  With Catterton, Plum significantly grew its distribution channels, broadened its product assortment and expanded the brand to include offerings for toddlers and kids.  In 2012, Plum Organics was the second fastest-growing food business in the U.S.  ..."

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Coca-Cola Works to Counter Childhood Obesity

Coca-Cola Works to Counter Childhood Obesity | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

23 May 2013, TriplePundit --"Coca-Cola is taking the "best defense is a good offense" approach when it comes to eliminating perceptions that their products contribute to obesity. ...:

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The farmed halibut that's better to eat than its wild brothers

The farmed halibut that's better to eat than its wild brothers | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

22 May 2013, The Guardian -- "The farmed halibut that's better to eat than it's wild brothers.

 

Gigha halibut's sweet, oaky taste has high-end chefs queueing up – and its production is environmentally friendly.

 

These are four-year-old Atlantic halibut, and they may be the future of fish-farming: raised without chemicals and on organic feed. Unlike the flabby, slimy stuff we have come to accept as farmed salmon, this halibut is lean and far better to eat – in terms of ethics and taste – than its wild brothers.

 

I went to Gigha, a little island off the Kintyre peninsula, for a taste.Smoked Gigha halibut, which has kept popping up on menus since its launch 18 months ago, is worth the trip. Sliced thin, with a little lemon, its sweet, gently oaky taste (Gigha's smoke-recipe using whisky-barrel chips was designed by the acknowledged master, Allan MacDougall, late of the Loch Fyne smokery) has high-end chefs queueing up for some of the strictly limited production."

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Prepared meals remain hard sell in Mexican market

Prepared meals remain hard sell in Mexican market | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

22 May 2013, Food Navigator -- "Sales of prepared meals in Mexico are forecast to trend up in the next five years, according to a recent report, but are still lagging behind the overall rate of economic growth in the country."

GR2Food's insight:

interesting to see this article coinciding with the visit of U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Vilsack's visit to Mexico.

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Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation by Michael Pollan – review

Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation by Michael Pollan – review | Food History & New Markets | Scoop.it

22 May 2013, The Guardian, Paul Levy -- "Is our modern way of eating killing us and our sociability? Michael Pollan serves up an extra large helping of food for thought.

 

Despite the four recipes appended to it, Michael Pollan's Cooked doesn't actually belong on the shelf with the cookery books. A major work by an interesting thinker, this genre-busting volume will someday become a standard text in a standard university department – though no satisfactory one yet exists – that will teach and research the discipline of "Food Studies", encompassing economics, history, philosophy, anthropology, several fields of life sciences and the humanities.

 

Pollan himself is not a philosopher, though he makes and analyses arguments scrupulously; neither is he an anthropologist, though there is a sense in which Cooked is the successor to Richard Wrangham's ground-breaking work,Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human; nor is he a medical man, though he researches and presents the latest evidence concerning the attention-grabbing subject of "gut health" and chronic disease. His day job is professor of journalism at University of California, Berkeley; in 2010 Time Magazine said he was one of the most influential people in the world.

 

The accolade stems from the attention given to his earlier books, The Omnivore's Dilemma, In Defense of Food and Food Rules, the last two of which can be summed up in seven words: "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." Like all the best prophets, he has an aptitude for aphorism, as in "Don't eat anything your great-grandmother wouldn't recognise as food," "You are what you eat eats" and "Don't eat anything incapable of rotting."

 

Cooked is the story of his own mid-life further education, as he apprentices himself to masters who teach him to cook (and brew). The book and his training fall into four parts, each corresponding to one of the ancient elements, and to one of the skills developed by mankind to nourish itself. So in "Fire" he learns the techniques of cooking whole animals over an open fire; in "Water" he deals with cooking in a vessel, boiling and braising; in "Air" baking; and in "Earth" fermenting – cheesemaking and brewing."

 

 

 

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