Nutrition & Health
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Nutrition & Health
Curating articles on #food, #nutrition, #health including related topics such as #malnutrition #obesity #diabetes #foodlabeling #stunting #supplements. #biofortified, #omega-3s. Senior editor/curator - Margaret Carroll Boardman Ph.D.
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Broccoli not burgers: Cancer patients favor healthier foods

19 November 2013, Thomson Reuters Foundation -- "Hold the beer, burgers and french fries. Bring on the water, farm-fresh produce, chicken, pasta and hearty soups.


That's the advice to care givers from a consortium of nutritional researchers following a two-year survey of what U.S. cancer patients prefer to eat and drink.


The study released on Tuesday by the Cancer Nutrition Consortium aims to improve the lives of cancer patients by helping them get the meals they want while combating the weight loss and fatigue that often comes with aggressive treatment.


Researchers surveyed 1,203 patients at seven of the world's leading cancer centers, including Dana-Farber and the Mayo Clinic, and found 40 percent developed more sensitive palates after starting treatments like chemotherapy and radiation.


Some 52 percent of the surveyed patients said they were avoiding greasy or fried foods, 44 percent said they were avoiding spicy foods, and nearly a third said they were avoiding acidic foods like grapefruit. Most patients cited intolerance, while less than half said they were acting on the advice of doctors. ..."

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Eat Nuts, Live Longer?

20 November 2013, WebMD, Serena Gordon -- "Study linked a daily handful of any nut to 20 percent reduction in death risk over 30 years.


If you like nuts -- and it doesn't seem to matter what kind is your personal favorite -- you might be cutting your risk of early death by eating a handful of them every day.


New research found that people who ate a 1-ounce serving of nuts each day showed a 20 percent reduced risk of dying from any cause over three decades, compared to those who didn't eat the tasty snacks.


"We looked at nut consumption in approximately 119,000 Americans over the past 30 years," said study senior author Dr. Charles Fuchs, director of the Gastrointestinal Cancer Center at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. "People who were regular nut consumers had a significant reduction in [death from all causes]."


"This is an observational study, so it's not absolute in terms of proof," Fuchs said. "But prior studies suggest health benefits like a lower risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes, and lower cholesterol, among other health outcomes." ...

 



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Beneo chief: ‘It is the duty of the food industry to offer healthy solutions'

Beneo chief: ‘It is the duty of the food industry to offer healthy solutions' | Nutrition & Health | Scoop.it

19 November 2013, NutraIngredients, shane Starling -- "With the World Health Organization just last week calling on the food industry to do more to improve global nutrition levels, the new(ish) chief of European ingredients giant Beneo says better nutrition will always be front and centre at his company. ..."

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Breast Milk With Solid Foods Might Stave Off Allergies

18 November 2013, WebMD, Steven Reinberg -- "Study also found waiting until 17 weeks to introduce solids is key.


Giving babies solid food while still breast-feeding, and waiting until 17 weeks to do so, might protect the infants fromfood allergies, British researchers say.


The overlap between starting solid foods while still breast-feeding teaches the immune system that food is safe and prevents food allergies, the researchers theorized.


"Mothers should continue to breast-feed beyond introducing solids into the diet so the immune system can benefit from the immunological factors in breast milk that educate the immune system," said lead researcher Kate Grimshaw, a research fellow and allergy specialist at the University of Southampton. ..."

GR2Food's insight:

Cited reference: Nov. 18, 2013, online edition of the journal Pediatrics.


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Vegetable protein may help kidney disease patients live longer: Study

Vegetable protein may help kidney disease patients live longer: Study | Nutrition & Health | Scoop.it

18 November 2013, NutraIngredients, Nathan Gray -- "Increased consumption of vegetable protein may be associated with increased survival among people with kidney disease, according to new research. ..."

GR2Food's insight:

Cited research: presentation at the ASN Kidney Week 2013 by Xiaorui Chen, University of Utah

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Metastisizing Misinformation About GMOs And RNA: Ugly Glare On Union Of Concerned Scientists, Consumers Union

Metastisizing Misinformation About GMOs And RNA: Ugly Glare On Union Of Concerned Scientists, Consumers Union | Nutrition & Health | Scoop.it

12 November 2013, Forbes, Jon Entine -- "As the Genetic Literacy Project reports, the Union of Concerned Scientists, Consumers Union and prominent anti-GMO journalists are discouragingly but predictably silent after multiple science publications discredit an alarmist RNA study they had hyped ..."


Article is based on the "fascinating and important article" in Nature Biotechnology that "sharply challenges a study that had made controversial claims that dramatically raised the fear factor about GMOs." 

GR2Food's insight:

Cited reference: Brent DickinsonYuanji ZhangJay S PetrickGregory HeckSergey Ivashuta, William S Marshall.  "Lack of detectable oral bioavailability of plant microRNAs after feeding in mice." Nature Biotechnology, Vol. 31, 965–967 (8 November 2013)

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UK Will Pay Moms To Breastfeed Babies Instead of Using Formula

UK Will Pay Moms To Breastfeed Babies Instead of Using Formula | Nutrition & Health | Scoop.it

17 November 2013, Inhabitat, Beth Buczynski -- "Breastfeeding rates in the UK (and around the world) are appallingly low. A new monetary rewards program could help.


Breastfeeding, although nutritionally superior to formula, is a big commitment. It means navigating what can sometimes be a painful and logistically difficult situation. For moms who work outside the home, it means pumping, and storing, and swollen breasts when you can’t. As a result, breastfeeding rates in the UK (and around the world) are appallingly low. To combat this trend, a new pilot program in Britain will pay new moms £200 if they breastfeed for the first 6 months of the child’s life. Local midwives and doctors will be responsible for monitoring the mothers, and verifying that they are indeed using breast instead of bottle. If successful, the program could be extended nationwide. Click the link below to learn more about this new program, and to access a list of breastfeeding assistance resources. ..."

Read more: UK Will Pay Moms To Breastfeed Babies Instead of Using Formula | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building 

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Improved nutrition is vital for food security and sustainable development, say world experts

Improved nutrition is vital for food security and sustainable development, say world experts | Nutrition & Health | Scoop.it

15 November 2013, Bioversity International -- "University students from Malawi brought messages of hope and action during the Nutrition and Sustainability Seminar on 12 November, one day ahead of a technical meeting leading up to the 2nd International Conference on Nutrition in 2014.


Malawi has estimated losses of $US446 million annually due to undernutrition. Their country faces erratic rainfall, drought, flooding and extreme weather. About 47 percent of children under-five in Malawi are stunted. 


But Tembo and Munthalie talked about transformation, describing how they are university students who are part of youth groups making change and how they take steps in their own lives to deal with climate change.  Their message reflected the broader theme, that food security is intricately connected to agricultural sustainability and nutrition – and to the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals. ..."

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Gut microbes in healthy kids carry antibiotic resistance genes

Gut microbes in healthy kids carry antibiotic resistance genes | Nutrition & Health | Scoop.it

13 November 2013, Washington University in St. Louise News, Michael C. Purdy -- "

Friendly microbes in the intestinal tracts (guts) of healthy American children have numerous antibiotic resistance genes, according to results of a pilot study by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The genes are cause for concern because they can be shared with harmful microbes, interfering with the effectiveness of antibiotics in ways that can contribute to serious illness and, in some cases, death.


“From birth to age 5, children receive more antibiotics than during any other five-year time span in their lives,” said senior author Gautam Dantas, PhD, assistant professor of pathology and immunology. “Frequent exposure to antibiotics accelerates the spread of antibiotic resistance. Our research highlights how important it is to only use these drugs when they are truly needed.”


The results appear Nov. 13 in PLOS ONE. ..."


Photo: Guatam Dantas, Ph.D.

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Could Weight-Loss Surgery Help Slow Aging for Some?

15 November 2013, WebMed, Alan Mozes -- "Small, early study found longer 'telomeres' in genes of patients with cholesterol and inflammation problems.


Beyond slimming the waistlines of morbidly obese patients, weight-loss surgery also may help reverse the aging process in some patients, turning back the clock on a key sign of decline in the body's cells, a small, early study suggests.

Investigators said the finding could be an unforeseen positive side effect of invasive weight-loss (bariatric) surgery for some people with cholesterol and inflammation problems. Such surgery comes in a variety options, all designed to prompt a dramatic shedding of pounds following intestinal rerouting or a reduction in stomach size.

The upshot: One year following weight-loss surgery, some patients were found to experience a notable lengthening of the ends of their genes' tips or caps, referred to as "telomeres." The wearing down and shortening of telomeres over time has long been viewed as a genetic indicator for aging. Meanwhile, longer telomeres have been associated with health and youthfulness. ..."

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Krill study suggests anti-aging potential

14 November 2013, NutraIngredients, Nathan Gray -- "Supplementation with krill powder could help to prevent age-related declines in weight and energy by altering important metabolic pathways, according to new research in mice. ..."

GR2Food's insight:

Cited research: Dr. Bodil Bjorndal, University of Bergen, Norway.

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Gut bacteria may be linked to rheumatoid arthritis: Study

Gut bacteria may be linked to rheumatoid arthritis: Study | Nutrition & Health | Scoop.it

12 November 2013, NutraIngredients, Nathan Gray -- "Bacterial disturbances in the gut may play a role in autoimmune attacks on joints, and could point the way towards novel ways to manage and prevent arthritis, say researchers. ..."

GR2Food's insight:

Cited reference: Jose U Scher, Andrew Sczesnak, Randy S. Longman et al.  "Expansion of intestinal prevotella copri correlats with enhanced susceptibility to arthritis."  eLife (2013)

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12 Foods and Ingredients That May Help Weight Management

12 November 2013, IFT, Linda Milo Ohr -- "satiety, lean protein, low carb and fat burning are four buzzwords that are commonly associated with weight management. In the November issue of Food Technology magazine published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT). ..."

  1. Dairy Protein
  2. Rice Protein
  3. Dietary Fiber :
  4. Raisins 
  5. Almonds 
  6. Korean Pine Nut 
  7. Potato Protein Extract 
  8. Saffron 
  9. Conjugated Linoleic Acid 
  10. Coffee Bean Extract 
  11. Canola Oil 
  12. Polyphenols 



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Drinking Milk as Teens Might Not Protect Men's Bones, Study Suggests

Drinking Milk as Teens Might Not Protect Men's Bones, Study Suggests | Nutrition & Health | Scoop.it

19 November 2013, WebMD, Alan Mozes -- "Boys who drink more milk during their teenage years might not see any drop in their risk for hip fractures as adults, new research suggests. Just the opposite: Their risk actually might rise.


The finding, which was not observed among women, is based on the fracture history of nearly 100,000 white men and women, middle-aged and older, who recounted their milk-drinking habits decades earlier.

... Feskanich and her colleagues discussed their findings in the Nov. 18 online issue of the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

The researchers said milk has long been touted as an essential part of teen diets. The most recent dietary guidelines from the U.S. Department of Agriculture recommend that adolescents drink at least three glasses of milk (or a dairy equivalent) each day.

The guidelines' goal is to ensure proper skeletal growth and health during adolescence, the time during which boys and girls amass roughly 95 percent of their future adult bone mineral content, the researchers said. ..."

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Moms-To-Be Are Eating Fish, But Choosing Low-Mercury Options

Moms-To-Be Are Eating Fish, But Choosing Low-Mercury Options | Nutrition & Health | Scoop.it

20 November 2013, NPR, Allison Aubrey -- "...Increasingly, it seems women of childbearing age are opting for a smarter option: They're eating fish, but avoiding the species that are high in mercury.


The Food and Drug Administration has long advised women of childbearing age who are thinking of becoming pregnant (along with those who are already pregnant or are breast-feeding a newborn) not to eat seafood that's high in mercury, such as swordfish and tilefish.


And it seems lots of moms-to-be have been listening. According to a new study from the Environmental Protection Agency, the blood mercury levels in women of childbearing age dropped 34 percent in the decade between 2000 and 2010.


And what's more, there's been a 65 percent drop in the percentage of women of childbearing age who have levels of mercury that are considered high enough to be of concern for health reasons. ..."


Photo: Based on new research, the EPA concludes that women of childbearing age are making more informed choices and opting for low-mercury seafood choices such as shrimp, canned light tuna and salmon.  Credit: JackF/iStockphoto

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Coffee polyphenols show heart health potential for healthy men: Study

Coffee polyphenols show heart health potential for healthy men: Study | Nutrition & Health | Scoop.it

20 November 2013, Beverage Daily, Stephen Daniells -- "Acute ingestion of polyphenols from coffee may improve the function of the cells lining blood vessels (endothelial cells), says a new study from Japan that supports the heart health benefits of coffee constituents. ..."

GR2Food's insight:

Cited reference: R. Ochiai, Y. Sugiura, Y. Shioya, K. Otsuka, Y. Katsuragi, T. Hashiguchi. "Coffee polyphenols improve peripheral endothelial function after glucose loading in healthy male adults."  Nutrition Research (2013)

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Access to Water Empowers Women in Morocco’s Middle Atlas

Access to Water Empowers Women in Morocco’s Middle Atlas | Nutrition & Health | Scoop.it

18 November 2013, USAID Blog, Karima Rhanem -- "I recently returned from Outerbate, a village high in the Atlas Mountains in central Morocco, where USAID broke ground on a new water supply system. In this Amazigh, or Berber village, the water supply system is more than 80 years old and serves only a handful of the village’s 300 homes.

The challenge is that the village’s 1,200 inhabitants must fill buckets and water containers at a common tap, and the task disproportionately falls to the village’s women and girls.


During the summer months, the tap frequently runs dry. Water-related health problems are common. In the winter, this arduous trek up the mountain in freezing weather and back to the village carrying heavy pails of water leads to health problems for women, including miscarriages. ..."


Photo: Increased access to water changes women and girls’ lives in Morocco. Photo credit: USAID

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How honey bees may one day help detect signs of cancers

How honey bees may one day help detect signs of cancers | Nutrition & Health | Scoop.it

9 November 2013, The Guardian, Nicola Davis -- "Honey bees have a powerful sense of smell and can pick up on a plethora of odours, from concealed explosives to telltale chemicals, or biomarkers, that signal disease.


Harnessing such sensitivity, the designer Susana Soares recently created a buzz at Dutch design week with a series of dual-chamber glass diagnostic tools that incorporate specially trained honey bees to sniff out signs of tuberculosis, diabetes or even certain cancers on a patient's breath. ..."


Photo: The device that uses bees to detect odours in breath. Photograph by Susana Soares

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The Myth of Organic Agriculture - Stanford Professor Henry I. Miller exposes the disappointing truth about organic agriculture

The Myth of Organic Agriculture - Stanford Professor Henry I. Miller exposes the disappointing truth about organic agriculture | Nutrition & Health | Scoop.it

11 November 2013, Project Syndicate, Henry I. Miller -- "

Organic products – from food to skin-care nostrums to cigarettes – are very much in vogue, with the global market for organic food alone now reportedly exceeding $60 billion annually. The views of organic devotees seem to be shared by the European Commission, whose official view of organic farming and foods is, “Good for nature, good for you.” But there is no persuasive evidence of either.


2012 meta-analysis of data from 240 studies concluded that organic fruits and vegetables were, on average, no more nutritious than their cheaper conventional counterparts; nor were they less likely to be contaminated by pathogenic bacteria like E. coli or salmonella – a finding that surprised even the researchers. “When we began this project,” said Dena Bravata, one of the researchers, “we thought that there would likely be some findings that would support the superiority of organics over conventional food.” ...


The bottom line is that natural chemicals are just as likely as synthetic versions to test positive in animal cancer studies, and “at the low doses of most human exposures, the comparative hazards of synthetic pesticide residues are insignificant.” In other words, consumers who buy expensive organic foods in order to avoid pesticide exposure are focusing their attention on 0.01% of the pesticides that they consume. ..."


Read more at http://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/henry-i--miller-exposes-the-disappointing-truth-about-organic-agriculture#3qEMdjehiXg9gRkG.99


Author Note: Henry I. Miller, a physician and fellow in Scientific Philosophy and Public Policy at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, was the founding director of the Office of Biotechnology at the US Food and Drug Administration. His most recent book is The Frankenfood Myth.

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UK - New mums 'paid' to breastfeed

12 November 2013, BBC News, Nick Triggle -- "New mothers are to be offered up to £200 in shopping vouchers to encourage them to breastfeed their babies.


The pilot scheme is being targeted at deprived areas of South Yorkshire and Derbyshire and funded through a collaboration between government and the medical research sector.


A third area is expected soon with the plan to trial it on 130 women who have babies from now until March.


If successful, a nationwide pilot could be rolled out in England next year. ..."



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It costs peanuts to fight child malnutrition in Haiti

It costs peanuts to fight child malnutrition in Haiti | Nutrition & Health | Scoop.it

14 November 2013, Thomson Reuters, Anastasia Moloney -- "For Haiti’s 300,000 children who face malnutrition, a high-calorie, high-protein fortified peanut butter could prove a lifesaver.


In Haiti, children are known to eat cakes made of mud to fill their empty stomachs and many families struggle to give their children one meal a day, so providing a relatively easy, free and tasty way to combat hunger goes a long way.


For Haiti’s 300,000 or so children who face malnutrition, a high-calorie, high-protein paste, known as Nourimanba, could prove a lifesaver.

Made from peanuts, milk powder, vegetable oil, and sugar, Nourimanba is similar in taste and texture to peanut butter but with added vitamins and protein.


The medical charity, Partners in Health and U.S. healthcare giant Abbott Laboratories and Abbott Fund, the company’s charitable arm, opened a new factory in Haiti earlier this year, which aims to boost production of Nourimanba and reach thousands more undernourished children. ..."


Photo: hildren play in a slum area in Port-au-Prince, on Dec. 17, 2012. Credit: REUTERS/Swoan Parker

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Many People Ignore, Miss Calorie Counts on Fast-Food Menus: Survey

15 November 2013, WebMed, Kathleen Doheny -- "Of 2,000 customers, 40 percent noticed the information and 10 percent used it.


Posting the calorie content of menu items at restaurants is designed to make diners stop and think, tally up the total and make wiser choices.

In real life, that doesn't seem to be the case, according to new research.

In a poll of 2,000 Philadelphia fast-food customers, aged 18 to 64, few used the information, even if they noticed it, said study author Brian Elbel, an assistant professor of population health and health policy at the NYU School of Medicine.

"Forty percent of the sample saw it and about 10 percent [overall] said they used it and reported to us that they purchased fewer calories," he said.

The study is published in the November issue of the journal Obesity. Elbel is scheduled to present the findings Friday at the Obesity Society's annual meeting in Atlanta. ..."
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Steve Kingsley's curator insight, November 17, 2013 5:24 PM

How come I'm not surprised?

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How Coffee, Citrus And Nuts Help Cut The Risk Of Diabetes

How Coffee, Citrus And Nuts Help Cut The Risk Of Diabetes | Nutrition & Health | Scoop.it

15 November 2013, NPR, Allison Aubrey - "Drinking two or more cups a day was associated with a decreased risk of developing the disease.


...Now, there's further evidence that coffee also helps cut the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. In the most recent meta-analysis, researchers found that drinking two or more cups of coffee per day was associated with a 12 percent decreased risk of developing the disease. And even decaffeinated coffee seemed to cut the risk, though not as much as the caffeinated kind. ..."


Photo: Coffee can help cut your risk of Type 2 diabetes, fresh research shows. Other foods, such as oranges, lemons and other citrus fruits, nuts and beans can also help. Credi: iStockphoto.com

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Expert review ‘recognizes and acknowledges’ the multiple health benefits of ‘special’ cranberry

Expert review ‘recognizes and acknowledges’ the multiple health benefits of ‘special’ cranberry | Nutrition & Health | Scoop.it

14 November 2013, NutraIngredients, Stephen Daniells -- "The potential health benefits of North American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) and its unique nutrition profile extend beyond reducing the risk of urinary tract infections to include multiples heart health activities and temper inflammation ..."

GR2Food's insight:

Cited reference: J. B. Blumber, T.A. Camesano, A. Cassidy, P. Kris-Etherton, A. Howell, et al.  "Cranberries and Their Bioactive Constiutents in Human Health," Advances in Nutrition, Vol. 4, 618-632.

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Are Probiotics a Promising Treatment Strategy for Depression?

14 November 2013, 3BL Media/Just Means via Elsevier – " ... Probiotics are live bacteria that help maintain a healthy digestive system. The development and marketing of products that contain live bacteria has flourished as there is a growing perceived interest in the ingestion of ‘natural foods’ that might promote health.


...  Over the past few years, studies have been undertaken to explore the possible impact of probiotics on behavior. It is within this context that the concept of a psychobiotic has arisen.


The authors of a new review article in Biological Psychiatry, Timothy Dinan and his colleagues from University College Cork in Ireland, define a psychobiotic as “a live organism that, when ingested in adequate amounts, produces a health benefit in patients suffering from psychiatric illness.”


They review the evidence that these bacteria, when ingested in adequate amounts, offer enormous potential for the treatment of depression and other stress-related disorders. ..."


- See more at: http://www.justmeans.com/press-release/are-probiotics-a-promising-treatment-strategy-for-depression#sthash.OYRDz06d.dpuf

GR2Food's insight:

Cited reference: Timothy G. Dinan, Catherine Stanton, and John F. Cryan. “Psychobiotics: A Novel Class of Psychotropic” Biological Psychiatry, Volume 74, Issue 10 (November 15, 2013)

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