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Prosecutors Demand Laptop Password in Violation of Fifth Amendment | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Prosecutors Demand Laptop Password in Violation of Fifth Amendment | Electronic Frontier Foundation | Gov& Law- 3rdQ Byron-1 | Scoop.it

Laptop password demanded, accused of fraud women's encrypted laptop taken by prosacutors.

Nick Iversen's insight:

This article tells the story of Ramona Fricosu who is charged of fraudulent realestate transactions.  The governemnt was trying to force her to open her encrypted laptop which required a password.  This violates her 5th amendment rights by them forcing her to incriminate herself

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U.S. Piled Up More Debt Since Election Day ’08 Than Under All Presidents From Washington Through Clinton

U.S. Piled Up More Debt Since Election Day ’08 Than Under All Presidents From Washington Through Clinton | Gov& Law- 3rdQ Byron-1 | Scoop.it

(CNSNews.com) - The federal government has now piled up more debt since Election Day 2008 than it did under all presidents from George Washington through Bill Clinton, according to official debt numbers published by the U.S. Treasury.

Nick Iversen's insight:

This article is about our national debt and how it has grown drastically since the 2008 election.  Compiling over 5.5 trillion dollars in a four year span

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Ryan johnson's curator insight, April 7, 2013 4:42 PM

Dont get me wrong, Obama has definitely done a great amoun tof good since he became president.  But at the same time, Th eamount of debt he has gained is ridiculous.  He is putting stress on many people because fo the growing debt.  I belive him and congress need to get their act together soon.

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Former Presidents Reap Millions in Taxpayer Dollars

Former Presidents Reap Millions in Taxpayer Dollars | Gov& Law- 3rdQ Byron-1 | Scoop.it

Capitalizing on a little-noticed component of the federal budget, a number of former U.S. presidents are enjoying the retirement benefit of millions of taxpayer dollars, including expenses for rent, postage, phone, and office staff, and even their satellite television bills.

Nick Iversen's insight:

This article is about former president Bill Clinton and how our taxpayer dollars are paying for his television and other things

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FBI violated 1st Amendment rights of Muslims, suit alleges

An FBI operation apparently violated the First Amendment rights of hundreds of Muslims by using a paid spy to illegally monitor several Californian mosques based solely on their religion, a federal lawsuit has been filed. Filed on behalf of three Muslims, the lawsuit accuses FBI agents and employees of paying Craig Monteilh to go undercover, record conversations and infiltrate mosques to rule out potential terrorists. This is violating the Muslims 1st Amendment of freedom of religion. It is unconstitutional because there could be innocent people practicing their religion, and getting spied on for it. Also, it is illegally done, making matters even worse.


Via Victoria Fortunato
Nick Iversen's insight:

This is an article about how the FBI violated the rights of hundreds of muslims.  They paid a spy to monitor several mosques in California to see if there was any terroristic threats.  This is based solely on religion, which violates the first amendment right of freedom of religion.  The spy recorded conversations.

 

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Abby Bisgard's comment, March 3, 2013 5:46 PM
The FBI definitely messed up!
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Officers Violate 4th Amendment, Make Up Lie : Dispatches from the Creation Wars

Officers Violate 4th Amendment, Make Up Lie : Dispatches from the Creation Wars | Gov& Law- 3rdQ Byron-1 | Scoop.it

The story of sheriff's deputies in San Luis Obispo, California conspiring to fake a police report and invent a reason why they violated the 4th amendment. A man was target shooting on his own propertand they cops lied about what really happened.


Via James Coppa
Nick Iversen's insight:

This is a story about police in California who violated the 4th amendment.  A man was target shooting on his own private property in a rural area.  A neighbor called the police because he heard the shots, and the man was arrested for and they searched his home without probable cause.

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Zachary Brekke's comment, February 15, 2013 12:04 PM
A very bias article, but it does a good job in exposing police “stupidity.” The whole situation is another great example of government policy overriding common sense. The officers probably knew the suspect was doing nothing wrong, yet policy dictates that they investigate. Another stupid situation blown way out of proportion.
dsnow37's comment, February 17, 2013 8:29 AM
This article is very shocking and interesting.
Abby Bisgard's comment, February 17, 2013 10:05 PM
I think this article shows that cops have to be very careful in taking action. Obviously, it is possible to violate laws, themselves.
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Prosecutors Demand Laptop Password in Violation of Fifth Amendment | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Prosecutors Demand Laptop Password in Violation of Fifth Amendment | Electronic Frontier Foundation | Gov& Law- 3rdQ Byron-1 | Scoop.it

Laptop password demanded, accused of fraud women's encrypted laptop taken by prosacutors.

Nick Iversen's insight:

This article tells the story of Ramona Fricosu who is charged of fraudulent realestate transactions.  The governemnt was trying to force her to open her encrypted laptop which required a password.  This violates her 5th amendment rights by them forcing her to incriminate herself

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Freedom of the press applies to everyone -- yes, even bloggers (1st amendment)

Freedom of the press applies to everyone -- yes, even bloggers (1st amendment) | Gov& Law- 3rdQ Byron-1 | Scoop.it

Analysis:  Recent stories have shown bloggers and reporters are posting pictures up and doing things such as videotaping police. Emily Good of Rochester, NY was recently caught by a cop when videotaping him off of her camera. He went over to her and told her to stop and stated it was illegal. When taken to court, she was later charged with obstruction of justice for arguing with a police officer. As it turned out, the police officer was wrong. Videotaping the police and anyone else in a public place is perfectly legal in New York state. The chief of police apologized later on and found out that the 1st amendment does protect these citizens who are deciding to do this. I don't agree with the 1st amendment toward this situation. I feel that everybody should have their own privacy, especially a cop. Why should somebody be able to videotape somebody else or take pictures of somebody else if it isn't okay with the person being captured on camera? I know that if somebody was videotaping me or taking pictures of me, i would feel that its against my personal property and i would definitely say something. I do agree with the 1st amendment, but when it comes to invading personal property, i feel its not right.

 

 

this article relates to the 1st amendment and freedom of speech. this article is asking if freedom of speech applies to internet bloggers


Via joe mangione
Nick Iversen's insight:

This story is interesting because it deals with an issue that is very current.  Police have been prosecuting people for taking photos, or videos of them, saying it is against the law.  This article explains why they are wrong and have the first amendment protects this right of ours. 

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Mitchell Forrest Enerson's curator insight, April 23, 6:44 PM

It is great to see that even the Chief of Police understands that he is not above any citizens. All of the police work should be shown to the people just as any citizen's is. People are often shown and portrayed poorly but when it comes to police officers they seem to be always taken as great people. They are not above the law and need to be treated just as any other citizen of the United States.

 

Austin Robertson's comment, April 27, 3:08 PM
I agree with mitch. I think if there was a sense of equality in this world it would avoid a lot of fighting. All most people want is to be heard. When people see police getting the same treatment as a normal citizen it s gonna make people happy.
Nikolas's curator insight, May 27, 7:21 AM

this article is talking about vidotapeing and picks in puplic place and the privacy that follows and the laws that effect this weather they are right or wrong 

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10 of the Best Movie Presidents of All Time - ABC News

10 of the Best Movie Presidents of All Time - ABC News | Gov& Law- 3rdQ Byron-1 | Scoop.it
ABC News10 of the Best Movie Presidents of All TimeABC NewsNever has there been a more desirable man in the movie White House than Andrew Shepherd.

Via Henrik Safegaard - Cloneartist
Nick Iversen's insight:

This is an article highlight the 10 best president movies of all-time.  I thought it was pretty interesting.  They are not numbered so I am not sure if it begins with number 1 or 10

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MsHaeussinger's comment, March 17, 2013 2:39 PM
Interesting regardless, thanks for sharing!
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Former NPR Chief Calls for End to Federal Support

Former NPR Chief Calls for End to Federal Support | Gov& Law- 3rdQ Byron-1 | Scoop.it
The former chief executive officer of National Public Radio believes the network would perform better without federal government support, he told Newsmax in an exclusive interview.

Via Jack Hansen
Nick Iversen's insight:

The formery chief executive officer of National Public Radio (NPR).  He believes that the network would be better off wihout government support.  Although only 10% of NPR's money comes from the government, he believes removing those subsidies would increase NPR's credibility.  

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George Washington's views on political parties in America

George Washington's views on political parties in America | Gov& Law- 3rdQ Byron-1 | Scoop.it

BY DENNIS JAMISON, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

 

When George Washington became President of the United States in 1789, there were no political parties.Political parties first emerged during Washington’s first term in office with the Alexander Hamilton’s Federalist Party in 1791 and in the following year, the formation of the Anti-Federalist Party or Democratic-Republicans under the leadership of Thomas Jefferson.

The two political parties formulated their views of how government ought to operate in the new republic.

 

At the end of Washington’s first term, as he was preparing to retire and go back to Mt. Vernon to just be a farmer again, the leaders of the opposing parties both wanted him to reconsider with Hamilton and Jefferson pleading with Washington to stay on for a second term.

Jefferson is credited as stating: “North and South will hang together if they have you to hang on.”

 

Washington finally consented to such sentiments and was again the obvious choice of the Electoral College as they re-elected him in February of 1793.

 

 

[MORE] http://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/history-purpose/2012/mar/9/george-washington-warns-against-political-parties/


Via Michael Charney
Nick Iversen's insight:

This article talks about how during Washingtons presidency, two political parties emerged.  The Federalist and the Anti-Federalists.  It goes through how Washington was coaxed into a second term, and what happened with the parties during Washingtons 2nd term

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Tanner Mathews's curator insight, February 27, 2013 9:52 AM

its saying that while george washington was president is when the federalist and antifederalist parties were founded. 

Kaitlyn Joseph's comment, February 28, 2013 6:57 AM
This is a great and interesting article. It covers great history over Washingtons presidency. He had the federalist and the anti-federalist. We still have them today. This article talks about the political parties during Washingtons terms as president.
Eric Olson's curator insight, March 19, 2013 5:59 PM

This article states about how the political parties came about. They were not always Republican and Democratic parites. In Washington's time they were Federalists and Anti-Federalists.

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Texas judge says warrantless cellphone tracking violates Fourth Amendment, saga continues

Texas judge says warrantless cellphone tracking violates Fourth Amendment, saga continues | Gov& Law- 3rdQ Byron-1 | Scoop.it

Judge rules that warrentless cellphone tracking is in violation and is unconstitutional.

Nick Iversen's insight:

This short article talks about how a judge in texas believes that warrantless cellphone tracking violates the 4th amendment.  These records include the date, time, call number, and location of call.  The Federal governemnt argues that the 4th amendment does not cover cell phones

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MsHaeussinger's comment, February 18, 2013 5:27 PM
Hmmm.. curious to know the judge's personal beliefs? Typically, cell phone tracking has been upheld in court
Zachary Brekke's comment, February 25, 2013 8:16 AM
Well of course the 4th amendment does not cover cell phones, but maybe it is time for new amendment?
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Expert: New CISPA Bill Isn't SOPA, But Still Attacks Constitutional Rights - US News and World Report

Expert: New CISPA Bill Isn't SOPA, But Still Attacks Constitutional Rights - US News and World Report | Gov& Law- 3rdQ Byron-1 | Scoop.it

Congress' latest attempt at a bill that affects the way people use the Internet has many scared, with some calling the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA) is "worse than SOPA," the bill that caused widespread Internet outrage and blackouts before ultimately being shelved. Experts say the danger level associated with CISPA depends on the answer to one question: Which Constitution amendment do you care about more, the First or the Fourth?

 

While the Stop Online Piracy Act dealt with censoring sites that illegally hosted copyrighted content, CISPA is designed to help companies fight cyber crime—potentially in exchange for helping the federal government spy on users.

 

"It's a completely different issue [than SOPA]," says Jim Dempsey, vice president for public policy at the Center for Democracy and Technology. "This is about government monitoring. [SOPA] is about the First amendment, [CISPA] is about the Fourth, but they both take a legitimate problem and try to tackle it with an overbroad solution."

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Nick Iversen's insight:

This article talks about CISPA (Cyber intelligence Sharing and Intelligence Act).    The main goal of CISPA is to help fight cyber crime- stock foreign governments and hackers from stealing info from American corporations.  It talks about how the governemnt and companies could come to a kind of "standoff".  You give me one thing, ill give you the other because technically, the Act does not say companies have to share data with government, but on the other side, it doesnt say governement has to share cybersecurity secrets with the companies. 

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dsnow37's comment, February 9, 2013 9:19 AM
In this article it talks about how companies don't have to share data with the government. But it also gets to the point where the government doesn't have to share data with the companies.
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We the People: Gouverneur Morris & the US Constitution’s Preamble | David J. Shestokas

We the People: Gouverneur Morris & the US Constitution’s Preamble | David J. Shestokas | Gov& Law- 3rdQ Byron-1 | Scoop.it
There were many luminaries at the 1787 Constitutional Convention. Washington, Franklin et al. Often overlooked is the Preamble's author, Gouverneur

Via Dave Cottrell
Nick Iversen's insight:

This is interesting because it talks about Goucerneur Morris, the man who wrote the first line of the constitution "we the people".  It is interesting to think about who exactly that phrase covers these days. 

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Dave Cottrell's curator insight, February 2, 2013 12:36 PM

Those who are covered by the phrase, "We the people..." ought to take a real interest in the document that has offered so many people so much freedom and rise up to defend it before it is taken away... I am not advocating for war;  I am talking about speaking up as a mighty people BEFORE it gets to that awful conclusion...