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Eat me, drink me, love me: The dangers of eating in Gothic texts | The Gothic Imagination

Eat me, drink me, love me: The dangers of eating in Gothic texts | The Gothic Imagination | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it
In exploring the idea of the Gothic body, Steven Bruhm points out that we are presented with an excessive display of a reminder of the body’s fragility. He refers to starvation as an example of this. The Gothic has long been regarded by theorists as the location for the repressed or for that which has been purged from normality. For these reasons, it is the perfect location for weird or excessive appetites. Uncontrollable appetite is repulsive and taboo. It reminds us of our animalistic selves and incites a level of horror and fascination that is relished in Gothic texts and by readers of the Gothic. I am going to look at a random selection of texts where food consumption and appetite are punishable or dangerous or veer into the taboo or terrifying. Food and its preparation have often been deemed part of the private, feminine sphere of culture. While other genres do explore the symbolism of food in familial or cultural gatherings, Gothic texts accord a power to all things oral that suggests something much deeper and darker is going on in our dealings with what we put in our mouths.
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Five Stories About Cannibalism | Tor.com

Five Stories About Cannibalism | Tor.com | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it
From stew to BBQ ribs, humans are cooked to perfection in these five stories.
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"Lovecraft eZine" issue 34 is online -- read free!

"Lovecraft eZine" issue 34 is online -- read free! | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it
Issue #34 contains a column by Robert M. Price, stories by W.H. Pugmire, Joe Pulver, and nine other tales! Comment on the stories for your chance to win swag.
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Frankenstein and Fantasmagoriana, Story 1: L’Amour muet

Frankenstein and Fantasmagoriana, Story 1:  L’Amour muet | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it
by Maximiliaan van Woudenberg Happy New Year Everyone!  My introductory blog 'last year' – actually only a few weeks ago – provided a brief overview of Fantasmagoriana (1812) the text that inspired...
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Weirdbook Magazine relaunches -

Weirdbook Magazine relaunches - | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it
Weirdbook Magazine, one of the more celebrated and imaginative titles of the science fiction New Wave and modern-day resurrection of weird fiction, is now
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Reflexões sobre a obra de H. P. Lovecraft (Leandro Antonio de Almeida)

“Nossa proposta é analisar algumas questões que consideramos centrais da obra de Lovecraft: o mundo sobrenatural por ele criado, a questão da compreensão no protagonista lovecraftiano e a questão d...
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The Foundations of "The King in Yellow" and the "Necronomicon"

The Foundations of "The King in Yellow" and the "Necronomicon" | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it
Although Bierce would be the primary influence on the imaginary tome, Lord Dunsany, Edgar Allan Poe, Thomas Moore, and the ninth edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica all played significant roles ...
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Otranto

Otranto | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it

Welcome to Otranto.co.uk, the new press at Strawberry Hill, London.

Otranto aims to publish the best current research in the Arts and Humanities, in a completely new way that will redefine the standard in academic publishing

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"The uprising of Gothic" documentary promo - YouTube

This is a short promo video for "The uprising of Gothic" documentary video. Recent years brought Gothic aesthetics to the surface. It was seen in TV series, ...
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While you're waiting for Alan Moore's "Providence", here are some excellent Lovecraftian comics

While you're waiting for Alan Moore's "Providence", here are some excellent Lovecraftian comics | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it
Many Lovecraft fans are excited about Alan Moore's upcoming comic "Providence", available May 27 from Avatar Press. In the meantime, though, here are some excellent Lovecraftian comics that you ma...
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So What Exactly is the Colour Out of Space?

So What Exactly is the Colour Out of Space? | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it
Artwork for the H.P. Lovecraft's Historical Society's Dark Adventure Radio Theatre presentation of "The Colour Out of Space" (artwork by Darrell Lee Tuchton) Over the past few weeks we have reviewe...
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The Upper Berth | F. Marion Crawford

The Upper Berth | F. Marion Crawford | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it

The Upper Berth is the final story in our weird voyages and strange seas week which featured three strange stories set at sea. – The Editors

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Jessamy Taylor’s top 10 castles in fiction

Jessamy Taylor’s top 10 castles in fiction | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it
From classic scary gothic settings to warm and dreamy refuges, fiction is full of castles. Jessamy Taylor picks the most memorable
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New Publication – Ann Radcliffe’s Observations during a Tour to the Lakes | The Gothic Imagination

This edition, published to mark the 250th anniversary of Radcliffe’s birth, includes suggestions for further reading, editorial notes on the text, and an introductory essay. The latter provides background on Radcliffe’s life and work, and considers the ways in which Observations contributes to developing ideas about the cultural significance of the Lake District during a period in which that region was still in the process of imaginative discovery.

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Christopher Frayling and Abi Morgan, A Good Read - BBC Radio 4

Christopher Frayling and Abi Morgan, A Good Read - BBC Radio 4 | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it
Harriett Gilbert talks about favourite books, including A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by Dave Eggers, with award-winning screenwriter Abi Morgan and cultural historian Christopher Frayling.
His choice is The Bloody Chamber by Angela Carter, a collection of short stories in which he actually features.. And Harriett has recently discovered the darkly comic Mortdecai novels, including the first one, Don't Point that Thing at Me, by Kyril Bonfiglioli.
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How the vampire became film’s most feminist monster

From 1936’s Dracula’s Daughters to 2014’s A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night, portrayals of female vampires have always doubled as ...
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Werewolves in the woods - a 12th century account of strange happenings on the borders of Meath

Werewolves in the woods - a 12th century account of strange happenings on the borders of Meath | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it
By David Collins Giraldus Cambrensis or Gerald of Wales, a prominent Cambro-Norman churchman and celebrated historian composed many works, two of which were concerned with Ireland. Gerald visited I...
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Origins of the Ghoul

Origins of the Ghoul | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it
The earliest documentation of the ghoul comes from the Mesopotamian civilization, where these creatures were originally called “Gallu” and described as some type of demon (The Mythical Ghoul in Ara...
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Cristina Alves's curator insight, March 22, 4:02 PM

Aqui está uma daquelas figuras arrepiantes, mas pouco exploradas

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Review: The Gothic Child (The Palgrave Gothic Series) | The Gothic Imagination

Review: The Gothic Child (The Palgrave Gothic Series) | The Gothic Imagination | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it

The Gothic Child offers a thoughtful and comprehensive discussion on the child in gothic literature using the genre’s treatment of this figure as an idea, concept, and/or memory within a text, as captured in Georgieva’s claim that ‘[t]he gothic world is, in fact, the world of childhood’ (Georgieva 60). Georgieva discusses the typical portrait and nature of the gothic child and traces its development both structurally and thematically by initially concentrating her study on primary sources from the first wave of gothic (1764-1824). However, her later inclusion of contemporary horror films creates a significant link between the two periods of gothic in order to emphasise how both portray the figure of the child as a receiving vessel and to investigate the significance of this uncertain identity.

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The Haunted Houses Are Neither Haunted Nor Houses

The Haunted Houses Are Neither Haunted Nor Houses | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it
This article probes the somewhat ambiguous line often drawn between science fiction and horror films...
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Review: Horror Uncut: Tales of Social Insecurity and Economic Unease edited by Joel Lane and Tom Johnstone (Whitby: Gray Friar Press, 2014). 247pp. ISBN 978-1-906331-46-7, paperback. | The Gothic I...

Review: Horror Uncut: Tales of Social Insecurity and Economic Unease edited by Joel Lane and Tom Johnstone (Whitby: Gray Friar Press, 2014). 247pp. ISBN 978-1-906331-46-7, paperback. | The Gothic I... | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it

Imaginatively brilliant and hauntingly provocative, this collection of weird tales harbours a ruthless critique of the seemingly absent dialectic in mainstream political dialogues: where can we locate an ethical dimension in today’s climate of austerity, as financial crisis and corporate greed impose devastating welfare cuts upon so many? The lurid excesses encountered in these horror fictions counteract institutional corruption on various levels, revealing a climate of hardships that cannot be obfuscated by the tabloid sensationalised scapegoating of migrant workers and benefit claimants.

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Phantasmagoria : The Dark Side of the Light - YouTube

The Phantasmagoria shows of the early 1800s were our ancestor's equivalent of the modern horror film or spook show. Magic Lantern historian Mervyn Heard take...
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Exploration of the Lovecraftian Universe with the Use of Modern Physics: Matter and Antimatter

Exploration of the Lovecraftian Universe with the Use of Modern Physics: Matter and Antimatter | Gothic Literature | Scoop.it
While Lovecraft did not directly cite antimatter, he may have indirectly referred to it in describing some of his strange entities. For example...
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Gothic Sunshine: Spanish film and the creep factor of the full light of day | The Gothic Imagination

The Gothic mode is noted for its chill factor – and is therefore unsurprisingly antithetical to sunlight. Among the many familiar characteristics of Gothic style are greyness, mist and cold: when the sun does appear it is often labelled weak or sickly, countering the usual association of the sun with warmth and health and suggesting a malaise in the environment in which the story is set. Perhaps it’s no surprise, then, that nowadays the Gothic is not readily associated with Spain, which suffers from its own clichés, notably being over-endowed with sun. Spain and Italy provided prime Gothic locations for the 18th-century heyday of the Gothic novel, and Spain specifically was the location for works such as Lewis’s The Monk and Maturin’sMelmoth the Wanderer. Authors were drawn to such locations not because of the sunshine but the association of the Southern Mediterranean with superstitious beliefs deriving from Catholic societies that contrasted with the supposedly rational and pragmatic ideologies of Protestant Northern Europe. Well before the rise of tourism to Spain in the 1960s, the Gothic authors of the North took their readers on virtual tours to the country. With the rise of twentieth-century tourism, though, the equation of Spain with sun has replaced the earlier Gothic portrait of supersition.

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