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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Eclectic Technology
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44 Alternatives to Using YouTube in the Classroom

44 Alternatives to Using YouTube in the Classroom | Communication design | Scoop.it

"Over the last few years I've seen more schools opening up access to YouTube, at least to teachers, than I had in the past. YouTube for Schools has partially contributed to that trend. Tools like ViewPure and Watchkin have made using YouTube videos in schools a little less scary too. All that said, there are still lots of schools that block access to YouTube. That's why a few years ago I started to maintain a list of alternatives to YouTube."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 30, 5:55 AM

Richard Byrne has updated his post about alternative websites that provide video. Back in 2010 he posted 47 websites that provide videos with descriptions. This link will take you to that list  with some new sites that have come online, as well as sites that have been crossed out. He provides brief descriptions for the majority of websites.

Tennelle Searle's curator insight, March 31, 8:42 AM

WOW I will be defiantly be looking into the use of some of these. I am always hiding in a corner watching YouTube videos to ensure no nasty surprises  before I show it to the children,

Thb's curator insight, March 31, 12:33 PM

Utilisation de youtube en classe

Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from visual data
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World's Largest Tree Of Life Visualizes 50,000 Species Over Time

World's Largest Tree Of Life Visualizes 50,000 Species Over Time | Communication design | Scoop.it

Temple University researchers recently put together the world's largest tree of life visualized across time. The family tree of living and extinct organisms encompasses 50,000 species—only a fraction of the world's history of life—and would easily take up hundreds of pages if laid out linearly. To fit their work onto a printed page, the researchers, led by evolutionary biologist S. Blair Hedges, instead decided to visualize the data as a spiral.


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Creativity Scoops!
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7 Steps to Everyday Creativity

7 Steps to Everyday Creativity | Communication design | Scoop.it
You can make creativity into an everyday thing in seven steps by focusing on the everyday.

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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from World of Street & Outdoor Arts
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120 x Virtuoso Banksy Pieces You Seriously Can’t Ignore

120 x Virtuoso Banksy Pieces You Seriously Can’t Ignore | Communication design | Scoop.it
An all-time list of the best Banksy graffiti art and street art pieces, all showing Banksy locations of his works with street map views where applicable

Via Kuniko
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Manrique Yanira's curator insight, March 22, 9:21 AM

Una nueva lectura a lo establecido.

Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Business DNA (Design-Thinking)
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5 Things You'll Learn In Ideo's New Online Innovation Class

5 Things You'll Learn In Ideo's New Online Innovation Class | Communication design | Scoop.it
Build your creative confidence with the famous design firm's idiot-proof plan.

Via A. Kosuke
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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from green infographics
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An Interactive Flood Tool to Calculate Climate Change Risks

An Interactive Flood Tool to Calculate Climate Change Risks | Communication design | Scoop.it
A new interactive tool estimates the economic, urban, and demographic risks through 2030.

According to the World Resources Institute, river floods affect 21 million people in the world every year. In 2030, that number could rise to 54 million, with climate change driving the increase and urbanization putting more people in harm's way...


Via Lauren Moss
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Russell Roberts's curator insight, March 26, 12:07 PM

A valuable tool for urban planners. Honolulu also has similar tools to map the expected loss of shorelines due to rising sea levels.  If climatic trends continue, much of Waikiki and the Ewa Plain will be subject to flooding and rendered unihabitible.  Beach erosion is just the beginning of our urban problems.  Aloha, Russ.

Judit Urquijo's curator insight, March 29, 12:33 PM

Información útil

Descarga: web

Precio: gratuita

Idioma: inglés

Website del desarrollador: World Resources Institute


Descripción

El Aqueduct Global Flood Analyzer es una herramienta web interactiva diseñada para mostrar mediante modelos los daños de las inundaciones sobre los entornos urbanos, el PIB y la población, pudiendo consultar esta información tanto desde el punto de vista de la nación, la cuenca hidrográfica o el estado.


Una vez seleccionado el ámbito, la aplicación permite seleccionar el nivel de protección contra inundaciones medido en años, que hace referencia a los tipos de sistemas construidos para prevenir las inundaciones y que normalmente suelen estar dimensionados en función de los períodos de retorno.


En base a los citados criterios, la herramienta presenta los costes generados por las inundaciones en base a datos de 2010. La aplicación también permite a los usuarios estimar el riesgo futuro, realizando proyecciones en el contexto de tres escenarios climático y socioeconómicos distintos.  


Más información

http://www.citylab.com/weather/2015/03/calculating-the-cost-of-river-floods-in-an-age-of-climate-change/387154/

http://floods.wri.org/#/

http://www.wri.org/resources/maps/aqueduct-global-flood-analyzer

Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Business DNA (Design-Thinking)
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How can companies innovate through design think...

How can companies innovate through design think... | Communication design | Scoop.it
Design thinking is less abstract than it sounds and more organisations are using it to drive innovation and create winning solutions

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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from World of Street & Outdoor Arts
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Cairo Street Art

Cairo Street Art | Communication design | Scoop.it
Damascus-based photojournalist John Wreford gives an account of the street art and graffiti that has flourished throughout Cairo since the beginning of the Egyptian

Via Kuniko
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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Business DNA (Design-Thinking)
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Design Thinking Tools: Reverse Brainstorming - Designorate

Design Thinking Tools: Reverse Brainstorming - Designorate | Communication design | Scoop.it
Reverse brainstorming is a design thinking tool that solves the problem through focusing on the idea of what causes the problem or how to achieve an opposite result of what is expected.

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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Curation & The Future of Publishing
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The role of content curation in proving expertise - and why you need a curation hub

The role of content curation in proving expertise - and why you need a curation hub | Communication design | Scoop.it

What really separates curation from filtration is context — specifically a curator providing the reader the necessary context within which the filtered content should be consumed in order for it to make sense and have value to the reader.


Via Guillaume Decugis
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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, March 9, 6:18 PM

In the age of information overload, content has little value without context. It became a commodity which we're seeing a huge amount of flowing on our news feeds. This is a problem but also a great opportunity to show expertise: to explain, connect the dots, add value by positioning content in the context of a relationship with au audience. 


As this post's author Tom Martin highlights in this post, the logical conclusion is that this presents a challenge:


How can you add context and value in 140 characters on Twitter? How can your 200-word explanations compete with LOL cats on Facebook? 


By using a content curation hub.


What do we mean by that? 


Instead of sharing links and limiting your context to whatever fits in your tweet or focusing on grabbing attentions on Facebook, you can publish your curated content as a post on your blog (or if you don't have one, a Scoop.it topic page) which gives you plenty of opportunity to elaborate. 


There are several benefits with doing that:


1. By sending your social media audience to a page where they can show your curated content with added context and value, you can build that trust with your readers and show your expertise. And therefore what Tom Martin calls the content curation challenge. 


2. Readers can easily see related content which will engage them more and reinforces your importance to them. 


3. Your curated content can now be rediscovered in the future, in particular through search engines. 


4. You can add conversion hooks and call to actions to get in touch with your company, buy your products, etc...


So if you're just tweeting links, you're missing out.  

Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Creativity Scoops!
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Creative Thinking - Why My Personal Life Is No Surprises | The Brainzooming Group

Creative Thinking - Why My Personal Life Is No Surprises | The Brainzooming Group | Communication design | Scoop.it
new experiences on creative thinking. The important relationship in my life is focused on avoiding changes, surprises, and unplanned events. Creative Thinking

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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from creative process or what inspires creativity?
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Easily Distracted By Noise? You Might Just Be A Creative Genius

Easily Distracted By Noise? You Might Just Be A Creative Genius | Communication design | Scoop.it
What did Charles Darwin, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Marcel Proust all have in common? Besides being creative geniuses, they shared an odd quirk: The luminaries were abnormally sensitive to noise, and often required solitude to work.

Proust, f...

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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Creativity Scoops!
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Anne Lamott on Writing and Why Perfectionism Kills Creativity

Anne Lamott on Writing and Why Perfectionism Kills Creativity | Communication design | Scoop.it
"Perfectionism is the voice of the oppressor, the enemy of the people. It will keep you cramped and insane your whole life."

Anne Lamott'

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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Creativity Scoops!
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Imagination, the Precursor of Creative Thinking

Imagination, the Precursor of Creative Thinking | Communication design | Scoop.it
In the end, it turns out that imagining and day dreaming are not a waste of time -- as some people still tend to think....

Via Creativity For Life
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margot roi's curator insight, March 31, 10:12 AM

It's all about the unfocused focus!

Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from 21st Century Tools for Teaching-People and Learners
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10 Excellent New Educational Web Tools for Teachers

10 Excellent New Educational Web Tools for Teachers | Communication design | Scoop.it

March 20, 2015
Here are some very useful educational web tools we have curated over the last few weeks. These are EdTech tools we came across through posts from other edubloggers. As is the case with previous posts in New EdTech Web Tools for Teachers, we only feature the recent trending tools which we think would be a valued addition to teachers technology toolkit. Check out the ones we have for you today and share with us if you have other suggestions to add to the list:


Find out more here:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-tools-for-teaching-people-and-learners



Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 21, 10:29 AM

March 20, 2015
Here are some very useful educational web tools we have curated over the last few weeks. These are EdTech tools we came across through posts from other edubloggers. As is the case with previous posts in New EdTech Web Tools for Teachers, we only feature the recent trending tools which we think would be a valued addition to teachers technology toolkit. Check out the ones we have for you today and share with us if you have other suggestions to add to the list:


Find out more here:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-tools-for-teaching-people-and-learners




Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Designing design thinking driven operations
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frog ideate and prototype concepts on the future of Media

frog  ideate and prototype concepts on the future of Media | Communication design | Scoop.it
On March 7, 2015 Google and frog partnered in Milan, Italy and brought together 80 talented creatives with a background in technology and design to ideate and prototype concepts on the future of Media.

Via Fred Zimny
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Michael Ravensbergen's curator insight, March 22, 7:01 AM

Co design the new time!!

Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from visual data
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How Fractals Bring Imaginary Cities to Life

How Fractals Bring Imaginary Cities to Life | Communication design | Scoop.it
Artist Emily Garfield maps places that don't exist. "I think that's related to the way cities grow in real life."

Emily Garfield like to say that she grows cities. With pen, ink, and watercolor, the Boston-based artist creates maps of imaginary places that tap into the essence of urban form.

Garfield has long been interested by the presentation of architecture in visual art. The inviting, surrealist arcades and sidewalks of the Italian painter Giorgio de Chirico inspired Garfield to begin producing her own street-level dreamscapes as an art student at Brown University.

But it was when she created her first aerial view of a fantasy city—an abstract web of streets, bridges, and blocks—that she got a particularly positive response from other people. Even without any text, Garfield's drawings were strongly recognizable as maps...


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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40 Uses For Smartphones in School | mLEARNing | eSkills

40 Uses For Smartphones in School | mLEARNing | eSkills | Communication design | Scoop.it

The purpose of this article is simply to remove some of the negative connotations around smartphones and to consider new possibilities which we have at our disposal. In order for students to use smartphones in school responsibly, it is important that we set limits and rules beforehand.


A MUST READ!



Via Dennis T OConnor, Gust MEES
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Eneritz Madariaga's curator insight, March 19, 6:37 PM

Oso interesgarria ikasleen motibazioa sustatzeko!!

Zengin Çilingir Kale Anahtarcı's curator insight, March 23, 7:58 PM

http://www.zengincilingir.com

Manuel Morilla Jaren's curator insight, March 30, 4:41 AM

añada su visión ...

Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Eclectic Technology
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40 maps that explain outer space

40 maps that explain outer space | Communication design | Scoop.it
From the moon to the cosmos, this is the universe we live in.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 18, 10:38 PM

Outer space fascinates learners...and this post from VOX provides 40 maps that are divided into sections:

* The Solar System

* Earth

* Space History

* The Moon

* Mars

* The Rest of the Solar System

* Beyond the Solar System

If you teach Earth Science many of these maps may be of interest. One map that many students may find of interest is takes a look at the universe based on the moon being 1 pixel. It is located at this link.

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, March 21, 11:41 AM

Thx Beth Dichter! This is terrific!

Kathy Lynch's curator insight, March 21, 11:52 AM

Thx Beth Dichter

Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Business DNA (Design-Thinking)
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For Any Product to be Successful, Empathy Is Key

For Any Product to be Successful, Empathy Is Key | Communication design | Scoop.it
You can’t actually feel what your customers feel, but you have to try.

Via A. Kosuke
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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from World of Street & Outdoor Arts
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The Strangest Buildings on Earth

The Strangest Buildings on Earth | Communication design | Scoop.it
Remember when a glass elevator was considered cutting edge? These buildings blow every taboo design out the window (...pun intended?)

Via Kuniko
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Pedro Luque Sancho's curator insight, March 26, 11:55 AM

añada su visión ...

Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Creative Business
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SWIRL | Water, Eco & Design

SWIRL | Water, Eco & Design | Communication design | Scoop.it

Ecologico ed elegante: il rubinetto riduce il consumo d'acqua trasformandola in design


Via Massimiliano Cammuso
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Massimiliano Cammuso's curator insight, March 10, 8:07 PM

Water no get enemy! (Fela Kuti)

The product designer Simin Qui, has developed a water aerator that produce a beautiful complex liquid combination with three different designs. Water is a precious resource, we shouldn't waste it! 

Water aerators are very useful for preventing it and you can buy for small change. According to you, the SWIRL will be sold in large quantities?

Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Corporate Identity
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Inside The Hip Redesign Of Holiday Inn Express by IDEO

Inside The Hip Redesign Of Holiday Inn Express by IDEO | Communication design | Scoop.it
Ideo helps the budget hotel chain rethink everything from beds to mood lighting.

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Superb Vintage-Inspired Art Direction for Mosaert | Yellowtrace

Superb Vintage-Inspired Art Direction for Mosaert | Yellowtrace | Communication design | Scoop.it

Mosaert is a limited fashion line by Belgian singer Stromae, who's African roots have influenced the superb vintage-inspired art direction of the collection


Via Levin Chin
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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Amazing Science
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Engineers create chameleon-like artificial 'skin' that shifts color on demand

Engineers create chameleon-like artificial 'skin' that shifts color on demand | Communication design | Scoop.it
Borrowing a trick from nature, engineers from the University of California at Berkeley have created an incredibly thin, chameleon-like material that can be made to change color -- on demand -- by simply applying a minute amount of force.

This new material-of-many-colors offers intriguing possibilities for an entirely new class of display technologies, color-shifting camouflage, and sensors that can detect otherwise imperceptible defects in buildings, bridges, and aircraft.

"This is the first time anybody has made a flexible chameleon-like skin that can change color simply by flexing it," said Connie J. Chang-Hasnain, a member of the Berkeley team and co-author on a paper published today in Optica, The Optical Society's (OSA) new high-impact journal.

By precisely etching tiny features -- smaller than a wavelength of light -- onto a silicon film one thousand times thinner than a human hair, the researchers were able to select the range of colors the material would reflect, depending on how it was flexed and bent.


The colors we typically see in paints, fabrics, and other natural substances occur when white, broad spectrum light strikes their surfaces. The unique chemical composition of each surface then absorbs various bands, or wavelengths of light. Those that aren't absorbed are reflected back, with shorter wavelengths giving objects a blue hue and longer wavelengths appearing redder and the entire rainbow of possible combinations in between. Changing the color of a surface, such as the leaves on the trees in autumn, requires a change in chemical make-up.


Recently, engineers and scientists have been exploring another approach, one that would create designer colors without the use of chemical dyes and pigments. Rather than controlling the chemical composition of a material, it's possible to control the surface features on the tiniest of scales so they interact and reflect particular wavelengths of light. This type of "structural color" is much less common in nature, but is used by some butterflies and beetles to create a particularly iridescent display of color.


Controlling light with structures rather than traditional optics is not new. In astronomy, for example, evenly spaced slits known as diffraction gratings are routinely used to direct light and spread it into its component colors. Efforts to control color with this technique, however, have proved impractical because the optical losses are simply too great.


The authors of the Optica paper applied a similar principle, though with a radically different design, to achieve the color control they were looking for. In place of slits cut into a film they instead etched rows of ridges onto a single, thin layer of silicon. Rather than spreading the light into a complete rainbow, however, these ridges -- or bars -- reflect a very specific wavelength of light. By "tuning" the spaces between the bars, it's possible to select the specific color to be reflected. Unlike the slits in a diffraction grating, however, the silicon bars were extremely efficient and readily reflected the frequency of light they were tuned to.


Earlier efforts to develop a flexible, color shifting surface fell short on a number of fronts. Metallic surfaces, which are easy to etch, were inefficient, reflecting only a portion of the light they received. Other surfaces were too thick, limiting their applications, or too rigid, preventing them from being flexed with sufficient control.


The Berkeley researchers were able to overcome both these hurdles by forming their grating bars using a semiconductor layer of silicon approximately 120 nanometers thick. Its flexibility was imparted by embedding the silicon bars into a flexible layer of silicone. As the silicone was bent or flexed, the period of the grating spacings responded in kind.


The semiconductor material also allowed the team to create a skin that was incredibly thin, perfectly flat, and easy to manufacture with the desired surface properties. This produces materials that reflect precise and very pure colors and that are highly efficient, reflecting up to 83 percent of the incoming light.


Their initial design, subjected to a change in period of a mere 25 nanometers, created brilliant colors that could be shifted from green to yellow, orange, and red - across a 39-nanometer range of wavelengths. Future designs, the researchers believe, could cover a wider range of colors and reflect light with even greater efficiency.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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SageRave's curator insight, March 13, 11:59 AM

Someday, clothing may adjust itself to match the wearer's accessories. What do you think?