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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Social Media and the Value of Controlling the Conversation

Social Media and the Value of Controlling the Conversation | Communication design | Scoop.it
Social media marketing must be justified. Can we measure the value of social media and the conversation it promises?

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janlgordon's curator insight, April 30, 2014 3:59 PM

I selected this article by Andrew Osegi for Kunocreativ because it addresses a topic that  every social media marketer should be concerned about.


He asks a very important question:


"How do we give value to the fleeting micro engagements that make up social media interaction?"


Some insights to get you thinking and leveraging your messages and conversations online.


Here are a few highlights:


As the web grows, so too will the number of users invested in social media networking. In order for anyone (brand or individual) to reap the benefits of social, businesses must establish a reputable (i.e. searchable) presence in their niche or industry. This takes A) time and B) money.


Your social strategy must reflect, and adhere to, the measurable data produced when posting. This data will direct how you conduct future social media campaigns - where ROI really matters. More on that in this article.


He refers to social capital - In an article by Rig Dragon, social capital is difficult to predict and measure, but most definitely applicable in social media. Social media, like advertising, creates unseen impressions too important to ignore. - Good insights here!

 

Takeaway:


Think of your social media efforts as a transaction of energy. Reciprocal conversation, online or in person, is rewarding to all parties involved.


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Be a  Curatti Insider  - lots of articles like this and lots more great posts and services coming!


Read more here: http://bit.ly/1u5EDMR

janlgordon's comment, April 30, 2014 5:08 PM
Robin Martin, thanks for sharing, always appreciated!
Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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How to be a Powerful Tweeter and Thrive in the Twitter Ecosystem

This piece was written by Megan Garber for The Atlantic

 

A study based on 43,000 responses to Tweets found precisely what people like and loathe about microblog posts.

 

Here are some of the findings:

 

**Twitter, as a communications platform, has evolved beyond nascent Twitter's charmingly mundane updates ("cleaning my apartment"; "hungry") and into something more crowd-conscious and curatorial.

 

**Though Twitter won't necessarily replace traditional news, it increasingly functions as a real-time newswire, disseminating and amplifying information gathered from the world and the web.

 

**At the same time, though, being social, it functions as a source of entertainment. Which means that we have increasingly high -- and increasingly normalized -- expectations for Twitter as both a place and a platform.

 

**We want it to enlighten us, but we also want it to amuse us.

In that context, tweets that are informative or funny -- or, ideally, informative and funny -- evoke the best responses.

 

 **Tweets that contain stale information, repeat conventional wisdom, offer uselessly de-contextual news, or extoll the virtues of the awesome salad I had for lunch today don't, ultimately, do much to justify themselves.

 

So: Do be useful. Do be novel. Do be compelling. Do not, under any circumstances, be boring.

 

This is what caught my attention:

 

****Contribute to the story: To keep people interested, add an opinion, a pertinent fact or otherwise add to the conversation before hitting "send" on a retweet.

 

Takeaway:

 

"The Twitter ecosystem values learning about new content," the study notes -- so new info, it seems, is new info, regardless of who provides it.  

 

**Sharing your own work conveys excitement about that work -- which means that self-promotion, rather than being a Twitter turn-off, can actually be an added value.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering " Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://ht.ly/8OrS8]


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