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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from visualizing social media
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The Journey of a Tweet: Infographic

The Journey of a Tweet: Infographic | Communication design | Scoop.it

Twitter is a cultural phenomenon that has changed the way we communicate around the world. This infographic shows the literal journey of a tweet - from the initial tweet to the retweet and beyond.


This graph shows that a single tweet can cross social media channels in mere seconds. In this age of quick technology, people are getting information at such a rapid rate that it’s hard to keep up at times...

Check out the infographic for more interesting facts.


Via Lauren Moss
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Maria Persson's curator insight, May 16, 2013 1:01 AM

Look closely...where do your tweets go in your 'professional circles'?

EmbroidMe New Lenox's curator insight, May 16, 2013 9:34 AM

Amazing how information sharing has changed in such a short amount of time with Twitter.

Joe Wise's curator insight, May 16, 2013 5:32 PM

Always wondered what the .....

Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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How to be a Powerful Tweeter and Thrive in the Twitter Ecosystem

This piece was written by Megan Garber for The Atlantic

 

A study based on 43,000 responses to Tweets found precisely what people like and loathe about microblog posts.

 

Here are some of the findings:

 

**Twitter, as a communications platform, has evolved beyond nascent Twitter's charmingly mundane updates ("cleaning my apartment"; "hungry") and into something more crowd-conscious and curatorial.

 

**Though Twitter won't necessarily replace traditional news, it increasingly functions as a real-time newswire, disseminating and amplifying information gathered from the world and the web.

 

**At the same time, though, being social, it functions as a source of entertainment. Which means that we have increasingly high -- and increasingly normalized -- expectations for Twitter as both a place and a platform.

 

**We want it to enlighten us, but we also want it to amuse us.

In that context, tweets that are informative or funny -- or, ideally, informative and funny -- evoke the best responses.

 

 **Tweets that contain stale information, repeat conventional wisdom, offer uselessly de-contextual news, or extoll the virtues of the awesome salad I had for lunch today don't, ultimately, do much to justify themselves.

 

So: Do be useful. Do be novel. Do be compelling. Do not, under any circumstances, be boring.

 

This is what caught my attention:

 

****Contribute to the story: To keep people interested, add an opinion, a pertinent fact or otherwise add to the conversation before hitting "send" on a retweet.

 

Takeaway:

 

"The Twitter ecosystem values learning about new content," the study notes -- so new info, it seems, is new info, regardless of who provides it.  

 

**Sharing your own work conveys excitement about that work -- which means that self-promotion, rather than being a Twitter turn-off, can actually be an added value.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering " Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://ht.ly/8OrS8]


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Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Twitter (Trust) research: It's Where the Money & Action is

Twitter (Trust) research: It's Where the Money & Action is | Communication design | Scoop.it

Bob Brown of Network World has curated news of two very interesting Twitter research projects that caught my attention.


We all agree that freedom of speech is good,  and it's great that everyone can now  become a publisher. However, there's a double-edged sword: If we speak to a friend before we think something though, all will surely be forgiven and forgotten. After all, we all make mistakes. But if you click that Tweet or Share button too quickly, either succumbing to knee-jerk reactions or without first checking the facts, you may find the digital world to be less forgiving.


Content curators have to be especially vigilent about curating someone else's content to make sure the facts and information are correct.


I believe the research related to here is essential reading, as it is furtherment of an established and growing trend:


One relates to Wellesley College's Department of Computer Science where two professors have been awarded a near half million dollar National Science Foundation grant to:


****build an application that gauges the trustworthiness of information shared on social networks, and in particular Twitter.


This was originally envisioned as a form of spammer identification, but


****has broadened to be able to determine the past history of a tweeter and also whether information being received is available from multiple sources. 


The other brings us news of 'Tweetographer', a huge Data Mining project by two University of Cincinatti Computer Science students, descibed as:


"a real-time events guide extracted from information coming via large numbers of tweets." 


This could be available as a web or mobile app at the end of the year and one of the co-creators, Billy Clifton (his partner is Alex Padgett)


**sees the uses expanding in the future to predict election results and compiling product reviews.


My takeaways are:


**that we all need to be very aware that what we tweet today can and may be used against us in the future


**search is still very much in its infancy when it comes to engine sophistication, stay tuned.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/s00504]


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Infographic: Watch Tweets Appear Worldwide in Real-Time

Infographic: Watch Tweets Appear Worldwide in Real-Time | Communication design | Scoop.it

By Franck Ernewein, Tweetping is a map that shows where everyone in the whole world is tweeting from in real time.


Much like Poptip’s treatment of Twitter, you’re not really meant to follow it all. Country-by-country tickers do track the total tweets, words, and characters sent since you signed on, but hashtags and @-mentions flash for milliseconds, constantly replaced by a stream of data that can’t be paused for a moment, lest the system fall perpetually behind. Meanwhile, the geolocations of each tweet make their way to a world map as a glowing dot. As the tweets pile up, so do the dots, meaning the world transforms from prehistoric shadows to blindingly bright connectivity in a matter of minutes.


Via Lauren Moss
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Philippe Trebaul's curator insight, March 2, 2013 6:36 AM
Infographic: Watch Tweets Appear Worldwide in Real-Time.

"By Franck Ernewein, Tweetping is a map that shows where everyone in the whole world is tweeting from in real time.


Much like Poptip’s treatment of Twitter, you’re not really meant to follow it all. Country-by-country tickers do track the total tweets, words, and characters sent since you signed on, but hashtags and @-mentions flash for milliseconds, constantly replaced by a stream of data that can’t be paused for a moment, lest the system fall perpetually behind. Meanwhile, the geolocations of each tweet make their way to a world map as a glowing dot. As the tweets pile up, so do the dots, meaning the world transforms from prehistoric shadows to blindingly bright connectivity in a matter of minutes".


Infographic: Watch Tweets Appear Worldwide in Real-Time via @MYDstudio http://sco.lt/...


Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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What’s the #1 thing people are doing online? [Infographic]

What’s the #1 thing people are doing online? [Infographic] | Communication design | Scoop.it

What are you doing on the Internet? Shopping? Tweeting? Checking Facebook?


**71% of you are watching videos on Vimeo or YouTube

The infographic covers the PEW survey for the past

three years on what adults are doing on the Internet.


I love that 81% of us are using the Internet to check the weather. This is my favorite site to check the weather btw.


So what’s the #1 thing people are doing online?


Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Check it out here: [http://tnw.co/v5Ixp1]


Via janlgordon
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Darcy Kieran's comment, November 20, 2011 9:14 AM
Interesting. I'm surprised at the shopping numbers. I thought other sources of data had the % of people shopping online similarly high, but a much smaller % of people actually "buying" online...
janlgordon's comment, November 20, 2011 1:48 PM
Hi Darcy, I agree with you, it is a bit surprising - you would think the percentage was higher - there may be some hidden #'s they're not capturing, It'll definitely be interesting to see how how this looks after the holidays.
Rescooped by Antonios Bouris from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Content Curators Playing A Larger Role Online

Content Curators Playing A Larger Role Online | Communication design | Scoop.it

Tony Obregon wrote this piece on his blog - tonyobregon.com. It was curated by janlgordon covering her topic "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond" on Scoopit 


Tony reminds us that content curators play a role in information overload - they take time to sort, select, comment on good content that helps keeps you current on your topic of interest.


Tony says:


"With the ever increasing amount of online information from social networks, the need for organizing it has never been greater. Look around and there’s no shortage of aggregation tools to help us filter out the important stuff."


Here's what caught my attention:


**In this world of information overload, there’s now a new layer in the media ecosystem: the curator. If it wasn’t for that person who retweeted the story in the first place, you probably wouldn’t have seen it.


**So naming the retweeters in daily promos is the right course of action. Twitter is like a fire hose and Paper.li is selecting random tweets that would have otherwise been missed.


**Yes, they’re randomly chosen but I find a lot of value in them because they praise others for their contributions.


**It reminds me that they’re part of my network and I can appreciate their contributions that much more. I know when I’m named in someone’s newspaper it motivates me to continue sharing that type of content.


http://www.tonyobregon.com/2011/10/03/content-curators-playing-a-larger-role-online/


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