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Luminous Moon-Gate Taichung City Cultural Center

Luminous Moon-Gate Taichung City Cultural Center | Communication design | Scoop.it

Luminous Moon-Gate was designed in 2013 for the Taichung City Cultural Center International Competition. The objective was to design a public library and fine arts museum to distinguish itself as a city with arts and culture at its core. To achieve this, the design firm was tasked with creating accessible, attractive, and flexible space, and a rich social and recreational learning environment.

The Moon-Gate follows the philosophy that, with a commitment to improving society, architecture is inherently sustainable. High porosity between buildings allows wind to freely flow around the exteriors; low porosity materials facilitate better control over water and heat retention. Filtration systems throughout the interior and under-slab ventilation maintain steady temperatures. High-efficiency photovoltaic panels installed on top of the library and museum take advantage of the large surface area exposed to the sun, while energy-efficient lighting provides energy savings.


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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 18, 2013 11:46 AM

Sustainable building can enrich our lives while keeping the planet healthy.

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SHADE: A Solar Home Adapts for Sustainable Desert Living

SHADE: A Solar Home Adapts for Sustainable Desert Living | Communication design | Scoop.it

Team ASUNM, a collaborative effort between Arizona State University and University of New Mexico, has come together to address the inefficiencies of urban sprawl and to create a model for sustainable desert living, dubbed SHADE (Solar Home Adapting for Desert Equilibrium), which is an entry in the Solar Decathlon 2013 competition that takes place on October 3-13, 2013 in Irvine, California.

 

Using external vertical screens and a solar canopy for shade, the SHADE home experiences a stable, consistent temperature with the use of a radiant cooling system used alongside an air cooling unit. Team ASUNM is exploring the residential application of thermal storage to chill water at night to create ice that cools a glycol solution during the day.


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Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, July 18, 2013 4:15 AM

Exploring the deserts as a place to live may be a trend for the next decades or centuries. Here is one of the best approaches

 

Pedro Barbosa | www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com | www.theendoffacebook.com

gawlab's curator insight, July 18, 2013 3:28 PM

would love to know about existence of such solutions in Africa..

http://youtu.be/3AvjpnYE1gQ

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China's Sustainable Cave Hotel Under Construction

China's Sustainable Cave Hotel Under Construction | Communication design | Scoop.it

Construction has started on a cave hotel resort by Atkins that will nestle into the rockface of an abandoned water-filled quarry near Shanghai, China.

Once complete, the hotel will offer around 400 rooms, as well as conference facilities, a banquet hall, restaurants, a swimming pool and a water-sports centre.

The building will use geothermal technologies to generate its own electricity and lighting, while greenery will blanket a roof that extends just two storeys above the edge of the quarry.

 

Sustainability is integral to Atkins' design of this unique resort, built into an abandoned, water-filled quarry.


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Joram Walukamba's comment, July 3, 2013 7:43 AM
awesome
Joram Walukamba's comment, July 3, 2013 7:43 AM
awesome ....
linh pham's curator insight, October 7, 11:47 PM

A new hotel gonna be built near Shanghai, China which will call with a name ' Cave hotel'. This new hotel will have a shape like a waterfall in the middle of two buildings of hotel. A great ideal hotel will come up in the future make the guest really interested included me, it uses geothermal technologies to generate its own electricity. It is really a great hotel but what i consider is this hotel will be built in among the environment and it will be affect directly to the environment which many protecter want to protect the environment. Waster will be a problem with this hotel because there is no water factory near there. The idea of this hotel is great but it will create many problems to some objecter like green environment. I don't think this hotel can build and success in the future. 

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MARS Architects Cleverly Fold Climbing Walls into Bulgaria's First Sustainable Activity Center

MARS Architects Cleverly Fold Climbing Walls into Bulgaria's First Sustainable Activity Center | Communication design | Scoop.it
MARS Architects snagged first place in an international competition for the design Walltopia's Collider Activity Center, Sofia's first sustainable mixed use center.

Located in Sofia, the Collider Activity Center will mark the city's first green mixed use center to combine both leisure and exercise space. To tie together the site’s diverse programs, the architects inserted a series of dramatic climbing atriums into the folds of the building, creating a continuous climbing experience.


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Jon Carter's curator insight, January 4, 4:22 PM

Super cool, gotta go to Sofia for this one. Deep Water solo outdoor pool, with boulder's galore in the park outside, not too mention a few K square ft of climbing inside. Outside walls are transparent showing climbers moves.. So nice.

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Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic)

Inside Arcology, the City of the Future (Infographic) | Communication design | Scoop.it

For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future.

 In the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned “arcology” - a word that combines “architecture” and “ecology," with a goal of building structures to house large populations in self-contained environments with a self-sustaining economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri)
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luiy's curator insight, July 8, 2013 7:42 AM
For over a century, writers and architects have imagined the cities of the future as giant structures that contain entire metropolises. To some, these buildings present the best means for cities to exist in harmony with nature, while others forsee grotesque monstrosities destructive to the human spirit. In the mid-20th century, engineer and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller imagined city-enclosing plastic domes and enormous housing projects resembling nuclear cooling towers. These ideas are impractical but they explore the limits of conventional architectural thinking.  Science fiction writers and artists often imagine future architecture that oppresses the human spirit. Megastructures such as the pyramid-like Tyrell Buildings of “Blade Runner” dominate a decrepit skyline. The decaying old city is simply covered with layers of newer, larger buildings in a process of “retrofitting.” Beginning in the late 1960s, architect Paolo Soleri envisioned a more humane approach. The word “arcology” is a combination of “architecture” and “ecology.” The goal is to build megastructures that would house a population of a million or more people, but in a self-contained environment with its own economy and agriculture. “In the three-dimensional city, man defines a human ecology. In it he is a country dweller and metropolitan man in one. By it the inner and the outer are at ‘skin’ distance. He has made the city in his own image. Arcology: the city in the image of man.” (Paolo Soleri) In 1996, a group of 75 Japanese corporations commissioned Soleri to design the one-kilometer-tall Hyper Bulding, a vertical city for 100,000 people. Existing in harmony with nature, the Hyper Building was designed to recycle waste, produce food in greenhouses, and use the sun’s light and heat for power and climate control.  The structure was designed for passive heating and cooling without the need for machinery. An economic recession put the brakes on the project and it was never built. Soleri’s arcology concept is being put to the test in the Arcosanti experimental community being built in Arizona. Construction began in 1970. When complete the town will house 5,000 people. Buildings are composed of locally produced concrete and are designed to capture sunlight and heat. To be built in the desert near Abu Dhabi, Masdar is a 2.3-square-mile (6 sq km) planned city of 40,000 residents. Buildings are designed to reduce reliance on artificial lighting and air conditioning, and the city will run entirely on solar power and renewable energy. Begun in 2006, the project is planned for completion around 2020-2025.
Fàtima Galan's curator insight, July 9, 2013 5:44 AM

Amazing and beautiful analysis!! Believe it or not, the science fiction also has something to teach us about the city of tomorrow.

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Minimalism & Playfulness Define a Contemporary Shipping Container Residence

Minimalism & Playfulness Define a Contemporary Shipping Container Residence | Communication design | Scoop.it

The WFH House in China, designed by Copenhagen-based studio, Arcgency is a contemporary design, constructed of three stacked shipping containers.


The house surrounded by lush vegetation  ”was designed to produce more energy than it consumes through the use of upcycled shipping containers as a steel frame, a sustainable bamboo facade, a rainwater collection system, solar cell-clad green roof and permeable paving.”

The interior is neat, dressed up in impeccable white, yet with splashes of color here and there. The main floor is envisioned as one singular space that accommodates the kitchen, dining area and the living room. The main advantage is that, this type of space delimitation allows a seamless transition between the indoor environments...


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Immotopic's curator insight, March 4, 2013 4:06 AM

Le moins c'est le mieux*

Immotopic's comment, March 4, 2013 4:07 AM
Less is better*
Natalie Curtis's curator insight, March 6, 2013 9:18 AM

The WFH House is a perfect example of my inspiration for my Architecture Repurposing topic... it's sustainable, energy-efficient and innovative. It is a elegant representation of repurposing materials to be used in creative and intelligent alternate spacial use and design. The interior design is just as seamless and minimalistic as the outside and creates an open feel, as well. If you're at all curious about how the masterminds behind shipping container homes, do what they do, you'll find this blog interesting. The small array of pictures goes from the finished product all the way down the skeleton of the home and it's really quite fascinating to see the actual raw, industrial looking shipping containers being transformed into a modern, minimalistic and elegant home.