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How to Create an Effective Hashtag Strategy for Instagram

How to Create an Effective Hashtag Strategy for Instagram | Communication design | Scoop.it
To take full advantage of Instagram marketing, you need to incorporate hashtags. Here is how to create an effective hashtag strategy for Instagram.

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janlgordon's curator insight, August 27, 9:03 AM

I selected this article from Curatti written by Jenn Herman because I'm love Instagram and if you know what you're doing it can be very effective if it's appropiate for your particular business needs.


Hashtags here and on Twitter are a must to keep the conversation going, attract potential customers and/or a following, learn what your competitors are saying and doing........but if you don't use them properly it can work against you.


Here are a few things that caught my attention:


Hashtags

Instagram allows you to use up to 30 hashtags per post. But that doesn’t mean you should be using that many! Depending on your brand and your audience, you will likely find a sweet spot between 5 and 10 hashtags per post.


Using less than 5 hashtags limits the number of searches in which your post will appear. But using too many looks spammish and can annoy your followers.


Use Relevant Keyword Hashtags

Your hashtags should include relevant keywords that are associated with your post. If you sell jewelry, including tags like #gold, #jewelry, #fashion, and #gemstones would be considered relevant.

These should relate directly to the item or content in your post.


 Stay informed on trends, insights, what's happening in the digital world become a Curatti Insider today


Read more here: http://bit.ly/1vm8WRx

Alex Watson's curator insight, August 27, 9:56 AM

Thanks. Would like  to start optimising my use go #Insta an #Pin

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How to Create Content that is Meaningful, Provocative and Keeps them Coming Back

How to Create Content that is Meaningful, Provocative and Keeps them Coming Back | Communication design | Scoop.it
The Internet is full of people sharing interesting things all day. From liking pictures on Facebook to retweeting cool articles, sharing is something everyone enjoys doing in one way or another. Yet receiving likes and retweets can seem impossible.

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janlgordon's comment, June 18, 2013 3:01 PM
Anastasia M. Ashman Great to see you, so sorry I'm late in responding, sooooooo busy, hope you're doing well!!
Pushpa Kunasegaran's curator insight, June 18, 2013 6:24 PM

So true!

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, November 14, 2013 6:23 AM

Amazing

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6 On-Page SEO Strategies That’ll Boost Your Rankings

6 On-Page SEO Strategies That’ll Boost Your Rankings | Communication design | Scoop.it

If you’ve been around the SEO world for any amount of time, then you are probably pretty familiar with the basics of SEO. You know to do good keyword research and you have to do on-page optimization.

 

Sometimes, though, that on-page optimization can go to a deeper level than just making sure your meta tags are filled out… and you can go to that deeper level without having to be a veteran SEO.

 

Here’s how:

 

Tactic #1: Search for synonyms using Google

The use of synonyms in creating an SEO plan for your blog or website is pretty common. Finding those synonyms is not always easy or done properly.

 

I think the best way to search for these terms is to use Google. The reason is you get to see not only the synonyms but how they are ranking in competitors pages....


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John van den Brink's comment, January 8, 2012 10:03 AM
Thanks Martin for another great post!
Martin Gysler's comment, January 9, 2012 5:33 AM
I'm glad you like it John. Have a great week!
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Make Your Audience Your Newsroom: Civicboom

Make Your Audience Your Newsroom: Civicboom | Communication design | Scoop.it

"Civicboom is an online platform designed to facilitate content-driven organizations and individuals to work together in generating rich media content.

 

Content-seekers can place a request for specific content. Then, by using the Civicboom mobile app (Android), or by uploading to the plug & go site, a content-creator can respond with rich-media directly to that request.

 

All incoming rich-media content is then managed by the content-seeker, and directed to a customizable plugin to be embedded on a website."

Read more about it here: http://thenextweb.com/media/2011/11/12/civicboom-this-open-platform-lets-organizations-request-content-from-their-audience/

 

Sign-up here:  https://www.civicboom.com/

 


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janlgordon's comment, November 15, 2011 4:28 PM
This is great Robin!
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Research Shows Divergence in Social Media Uptake

Research Shows  Divergence in Social Media Uptake | Communication design | Scoop.it

Research shows the use of social media at Fortune 500 has stalled, or perhaps even re-trenched.


This article for 'Grow' presents Data  provided by the Center for Marketing Research at the University of Massachusetts.


What particularly caught my attention is:


***The almost universal uptake of Social Media by Universities and Charities.


***The divergence in uptake between Fortune 500 companies - the "titans" of American Business, and the INC 500, comprising America's fastest growing companies


A perhaps even more interesting divergence among the Fortune 500 where:


***The top 100 companies are the most active blogging companies.


***Only 17% of the next 400 companies blog.


It would be easy to conject as to the reasons for these stark differences, but I choose to let the numbers speak for themselves.  I will, however, be on the lookout for further pieces and more in-depth Data on this intriguing puzzle.


Curated by JanLGordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"


Read the full article: [http://bit.ly/tkN2XG]


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How to Curate Content Effectively

How to Curate Content Effectively | Communication design | Scoop.it

It's been said that if you want something, go find people who have what you want and ask them how they got it. Margie is a perfect example of someone who is successful, knows how to build community and definitely creates and curates consistent content.


Here's an excerpt from her latest post on curating:


This is what we're doing on scoopit!


I also ask people to let me know what they were reading that they liked. A lot of people took advantage of this opportunity, and when I did my round-ups I would credit those people by saying, “Xyz brought this post to my attention…” This helps you build your community on a lot of different levels, it exposes you to content you might not otherwise have seen, and you get to network with the new bloggers, too. It worked out pretty well for me in terms of teaching me the ropes of the online world.


My advice to you


If you want to get started curating some content, there are lots of different paths you could set your feet on. The most important thing is to make sure you keep it manageable. Like most facets of the online world, curating content can very quickly begin to eat your life. So here is what I would try:


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Social Media and the Value of Controlling the Conversation

Social Media and the Value of Controlling the Conversation | Communication design | Scoop.it
Social media marketing must be justified. Can we measure the value of social media and the conversation it promises?

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janlgordon's curator insight, April 30, 3:59 PM

I selected this article by Andrew Osegi for Kunocreativ because it addresses a topic that  every social media marketer should be concerned about.


He asks a very important question:


"How do we give value to the fleeting micro engagements that make up social media interaction?"


Some insights to get you thinking and leveraging your messages and conversations online.


Here are a few highlights:


As the web grows, so too will the number of users invested in social media networking. In order for anyone (brand or individual) to reap the benefits of social, businesses must establish a reputable (i.e. searchable) presence in their niche or industry. This takes A) time and B) money.


Your social strategy must reflect, and adhere to, the measurable data produced when posting. This data will direct how you conduct future social media campaigns - where ROI really matters. More on that in this article.


He refers to social capital - In an article by Rig Dragon, social capital is difficult to predict and measure, but most definitely applicable in social media. Social media, like advertising, creates unseen impressions too important to ignore. - Good insights here!

 

Takeaway:


Think of your social media efforts as a transaction of energy. Reciprocal conversation, online or in person, is rewarding to all parties involved.


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Be a  Curatti Insider  - lots of articles like this and lots more great posts and services coming!


Read more here: http://bit.ly/1u5EDMR

Robin Martin's curator insight, April 30, 4:33 PM

Engagement is never wasted!

janlgordon's comment, April 30, 5:08 PM
Robin Martin, thanks for sharing, always appreciated!
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How to be a Powerful Tweeter and Thrive in the Twitter Ecosystem

This piece was written by Megan Garber for The Atlantic

 

A study based on 43,000 responses to Tweets found precisely what people like and loathe about microblog posts.

 

Here are some of the findings:

 

**Twitter, as a communications platform, has evolved beyond nascent Twitter's charmingly mundane updates ("cleaning my apartment"; "hungry") and into something more crowd-conscious and curatorial.

 

**Though Twitter won't necessarily replace traditional news, it increasingly functions as a real-time newswire, disseminating and amplifying information gathered from the world and the web.

 

**At the same time, though, being social, it functions as a source of entertainment. Which means that we have increasingly high -- and increasingly normalized -- expectations for Twitter as both a place and a platform.

 

**We want it to enlighten us, but we also want it to amuse us.

In that context, tweets that are informative or funny -- or, ideally, informative and funny -- evoke the best responses.

 

 **Tweets that contain stale information, repeat conventional wisdom, offer uselessly de-contextual news, or extoll the virtues of the awesome salad I had for lunch today don't, ultimately, do much to justify themselves.

 

So: Do be useful. Do be novel. Do be compelling. Do not, under any circumstances, be boring.

 

This is what caught my attention:

 

****Contribute to the story: To keep people interested, add an opinion, a pertinent fact or otherwise add to the conversation before hitting "send" on a retweet.

 

Takeaway:

 

"The Twitter ecosystem values learning about new content," the study notes -- so new info, it seems, is new info, regardless of who provides it.  

 

**Sharing your own work conveys excitement about that work -- which means that self-promotion, rather than being a Twitter turn-off, can actually be an added value.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering " Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://ht.ly/8OrS8]


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What’s the #1 thing people are doing online? [Infographic]

What’s the #1 thing people are doing online? [Infographic] | Communication design | Scoop.it

What are you doing on the Internet? Shopping? Tweeting? Checking Facebook?


**71% of you are watching videos on Vimeo or YouTube

The infographic covers the PEW survey for the past

three years on what adults are doing on the Internet.


I love that 81% of us are using the Internet to check the weather. This is my favorite site to check the weather btw.


So what’s the #1 thing people are doing online?


Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Check it out here: [http://tnw.co/v5Ixp1]


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Emocean Club's comment, November 20, 2011 9:14 AM
Interesting. I'm surprised at the shopping numbers. I thought other sources of data had the % of people shopping online similarly high, but a much smaller % of people actually "buying" online...
janlgordon's comment, November 20, 2011 1:48 PM
Hi Darcy, I agree with you, it is a bit surprising - you would think the percentage was higher - there may be some hidden #'s they're not capturing, It'll definitely be interesting to see how how this looks after the holidays.
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Twitter (Trust) research: It's Where the Money & Action is

Twitter (Trust) research: It's Where the Money & Action is | Communication design | Scoop.it

Bob Brown of Network World has curated news of two very interesting Twitter research projects that caught my attention.


We all agree that freedom of speech is good,  and it's great that everyone can now  become a publisher. However, there's a double-edged sword: If we speak to a friend before we think something though, all will surely be forgiven and forgotten. After all, we all make mistakes. But if you click that Tweet or Share button too quickly, either succumbing to knee-jerk reactions or without first checking the facts, you may find the digital world to be less forgiving.


Content curators have to be especially vigilent about curating someone else's content to make sure the facts and information are correct.


I believe the research related to here is essential reading, as it is furtherment of an established and growing trend:


One relates to Wellesley College's Department of Computer Science where two professors have been awarded a near half million dollar National Science Foundation grant to:


****build an application that gauges the trustworthiness of information shared on social networks, and in particular Twitter.


This was originally envisioned as a form of spammer identification, but


****has broadened to be able to determine the past history of a tweeter and also whether information being received is available from multiple sources. 


The other brings us news of 'Tweetographer', a huge Data Mining project by two University of Cincinatti Computer Science students, descibed as:


"a real-time events guide extracted from information coming via large numbers of tweets." 


This could be available as a web or mobile app at the end of the year and one of the co-creators, Billy Clifton (his partner is Alex Padgett)


**sees the uses expanding in the future to predict election results and compiling product reviews.


My takeaways are:


**that we all need to be very aware that what we tweet today can and may be used against us in the future


**search is still very much in its infancy when it comes to engine sophistication, stay tuned.


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media & Beyond"


Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/s00504]


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How We Master Connectivity The Core Essence of Social Networking

How We Master Connectivity The Core Essence of Social Networking | Communication design | Scoop.it

"Without understanding connectivity, the basis of human connections, network theory, contextual intelligence, any business leader unable to grasp those things will be lost." [Warren Bennis]

 

The 12 habits of highly connective people has been the single most read and shared post I have written in the last couple of months. Literally.

 

Why it worked

 

Part of the reason is the structure of the post.

 

It starts with a great story told vividly by a master storyteller and maker who has earned tremendous respect and attention in the business and tech communities. Two communities I am becoming very involved with and hope to bring closer to each other...


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